Becoming YOUR Best, Not Someone Else’s

Is your company a mediocre company or an exceptional company? Today, the difference between mediocre and great is the difference between success and failure. So what exactly does it take to be exceptional?

No surprisingly, Steve Shallenberger says that business success starts with ourselves – with becoming our best. But he also says that becoming your best is not about comparing yourself to another person. It’s about becoming your best.

In Becoming Your Best: The 12 Principles of Highly Successful Leaders, Shallenberger reveals simple and entertaining ways to harness the power of these 12 principles. You discover how to make communication easier and clearer, live in greater peace and balance, more persuasively lead others with an inspiring vision, and how to embrace change—not fear it.

Shallenberger divides his principles into three thematic sections—Transformational Leadership, Transformational Teams & Relationships, and Transformational Living:

Transformational Leadership
• Be True to Character
• Lead with a Vision
• Manage with a Plan
• Prioritize Your Time

Transformational Teams & Relationships
• Live the Golden Rule in Business and Life
• Build and Maintain Trust
• Be an Effective Communicator
• Innovate Through Imagination

Transformational Living
• Be Accountable
• Apply the Power of Knowledge
• Live in Peace and Balance
• Never Give Up!

If you would like to learn more about these 12 principles, then you’re invited to join our Soundview Live webinar: How the BEST Leaders Ignite Energy and Fuel High Performance. This webinar will be packed with advice, tools, and examples for turning your thoughts into action, motivating yourself and your people, inspiring teams to solve problems creatively, and building the life you’ve always dreamed of.

You can also post questions directly to Steve during the webinar. We hope your will join us on March 10th and begin the journey to becoming your best.

Book Review: Bringing Strategy Back

BringingStrategyBack

by Jeffrey Sampler

When the world of business is so chaotic, leaders need strategy more than ever. However, the business environment is changing too quickly for conventional strategic planning processes. In Bringing Strategy Back, Sampler explains why strategy is more important than ever for your business. Strategy expert Jeffrey Sampler introduces four “strategic shock absorbers” that enable leaders to build resilient organizations that can withstand even the most unexpected global turbulence.

With four “strategic shock absorbers,” leaders all around the world at organizations of any size and type can build strong organizations that withstand chaos and instability. Based on the Sampler’s in-depth research into the world’s most unstable markets, these strategic shock absorbers work together in an ongoing process that can be applied to any organization: Accuracy, Agility, Momentum and Foresight. Of the four, agility helps leaders deliver with speed and flexibility in terms of strategic options. Leaders need to be able to act quickly using agility in unpredictable markets.

Businesses can’t afford to become stagnant in their strategic process in order to survive and thrive. Sampler says that giving up the old way of strategic planning can seem risky; however customizing the best approach for your business will make a positive difference. With this new framework, Bringing Strategy Back shows how to be prepared and proactive, rather than reactive, even when the future is uncertain.

Rediscovering the Art of Brand Marketing

MARKETING IN A DIGITAL WORLD

There are a lot of shiny objects in the world of marketing today. Traditional marketing channels such as television and print media ads are being outshone by the flashier marketing opportunities of the digital age, including big data mining and social media marketing. Many marketing experts happily sound the death knell of traditional marketing: television ads might have worked in the time of the giant television console with its rabbit ears, but this is the age of Hulu and Netflix.

In a new book titled Twitter Is Not a Strategy, Tom Doctoroff, CEO of J. Walter Thompson Asia, begs to differ. Given that global television advertising revenues are forecast to grow from $162 billion in 2012 to more than $200 billion in 2017, according to PriceWaterhouseCoopers, it seems a bit disingenuous, he writes, to say that television advertising is dead. The world is indeed changing, but it’s not a question of the past being replaced by the future.

As Doctoroff explains, traditional marketing was based on top-down positioning. The brands controlled the message and the channel, and customers were passive recipients. The digital age has given the customer more power in the process, which is now more bottom-up than top-down. Many marketing books tout this dichotomy as mutually exclusive; in other words, bottom-up has replaced top-down marketing. For Doctoroff, this is a false dichotomy. Marketing today is both bottom-up and top-down. That is why social media marketing is booming, but so is television ad purchasing.

Successful Marketing Today

The secret to successful marketing today, writes Doctoroff, is to know how to meld the two approaches together. “We must permit consumers to participate with brands without surrendering the ability to manage the message and what people say about their products,” he writes. The goal of marketers is to develop a life-long relationship between the brand and consumers.

To help companies enable customer engagement while managing the message, Doctoroff offers a framework for marketing based on four “interconnected modules.”

The first two modules are conceptual and focus on customer insight, on one hand, and the brand idea, on the other. No matter how much technology evolves, customer insight must remain at the core of marketing, he writes. Doctoroff describes the human truths shared by all and nation- or region-specific cultural truths, and explains how brands succeed when they can resolve the conflicts among and within these two sets of truths. Mont Blanc pens, for example, are very successful in China because, he writes, the luxury brand reconciles two competing cultural truths: “the desire to project accomplishments but also the need to be understated, to obey the rules.”

The brand idea, in Doctoroff’s words, “crystallizes the long-term relationship between consumer and brand that remains consistent yet evolves over time.” The brand idea emerges from the “fusion” between customer insight and a unique brand offer (UBO). The UBO, he writes, is based on product truths –– physical or emotional characteristics that differentiate the product, and brand truths, which build brand equity in the minds of consumers.

The executional modules of Doctoroff’s framework are engagement ideas, the ideas that will spark consumers to become engaged with the brand, and engagement planning, which is focused on bringing the brand into the lives of consumers. Successful engagement ideas connect to the three levels of passion, he writes: the individual-focused “me,” the community-focused “we” and the global-focused “the world.” For engagement planning, Doctoroff offers a step-by-step engagement system based on marketing communication at every step of the buying process: trigger (the unmet need), consideration, comparison, preference (choosing the brand), purchase and experience.

The core message of Twitter Is Not a Strategy is clearly conveyed when Doctoroff quotes Clive Sirkin, Kimberly-Clark’s global Chief Marketing Officer, who says, “We don’t believe in digital marketing. We believe in marketing in a digital world, and there’s a huge difference.” Twitter Is Not a Strategy also benefits from the global perspective that Doctoroff brings to the subject. His expertise in both China and emerging markets will be of immense value to companies looking to expand into these markets. Doctoroff has written a balanced, informed guide to branding in the 21st century.

You can sign up to receive free business book reviews every week by email with Soundview’s Executive Book Alert.

The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth

“How to be as weird as you want while providing a viable business structure to support it”

This is what Chris Brogan promises to those that read his latest book The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth.

Brogan continues “So, if you’re the kind of person who’s wanted to dig into entrepreneurship but hasn’t quite found the right way of hearing the story, this might be your book. It’s not about “the hustle” or “dominating” or “killing” anything. It’s about taking whatever makes you weird/different/unique/important to this universe, and helping you make a business interface that might help you do what you want to do a little better.”

So what is a freak, according to Brogan? Here’s is his definition:
• You don’t fit in without some serious effort.
• You are not a big fan of settling or compromising.
• You’re looking for ways to allow you weirdness to be an asset, and not as the deficit that people have tried to convince you it is.

If you fit that description, then you’ll want to join Chris Brogan and Soundview on March 3rd for a special Soundview Live webinar entitled, of course, The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth. You’ll have the opportunity to hear Chris talk about how freaks can be successful in business in their own unique way, and to ask your questions during the webinar.

If you think you may be a freak, the CEO of your own cubicle, or an employeepreneur, you won’t want to miss this live conversation with Chris. Register Today!

Book Review: Low-Hanging Fruit

LowHangingFruit

by Jeremy Eden and Terri Long

Consultants Jeremy Eden and Terri Long define low-hanging fruit as the targets or goals that are easily achievable and do not require a lot of effort. Your business can achieve better results with greater ease by thinking small and reaching for the low-hanging fruit like many of the smartest companies today. Eden and Long share 77 of their most effective techniques for generating real performance improvements drawn from their success working with major companies. In Low-Hanging Fruit, the authors explain why leaders should not agonize over large-scale change efforts and ways to reduce costs. Instead, they show leaders how to go after small solvable problems and uncover the low-hanging fruit.

“True low-hanging fruit is within your reach. Harvesting low-hanging fruit produces bigger results with much less risk than those big projects on which companies rely, like strategic transformations and enterprise-wide systems! Individual pieces of low-hanging fruit come in all sizes — from those worth millions of dollars to those worth just a few thousand dollars. Collectively, it is your growth engine,” write Eden and Long. Of the 77 techniques outlined by Eden and Long, the first few help leaders and managers find ways to see problems easily, for example “Ask “Why?” Five Times to See the Real Problem.” This point illustrates the importance of asking “Why?” which will help you gain progress toward finding the right problem to solve.

If you think you don’t have the resources to be faster, better and more profitable, think again. Low-Hanging Fruit will help managers and leaders to boost productivity in their organizations by identifying and solving hidden problems.