A Manager’s Guide to Getting Results –– Without Losing Your Soul

WinningWell

Winning Well by Karin Hurt and David Dye

It can feel like a rigged game. Executives set aggressive goals, so managers drive their teams to burnout trying to deliver. Or, employees seek connection and support, so managers focus on relationships . . . and fail to make the numbers. The fallout is stress, frustration and disengagement, and not just among team members –– two-thirds of managers report being disengaged. To succeed, managers cannot choose between results and relationships. They need both: They must get people to achieve while creating an environment that makes them truly want to.

Winning Well offers managers a quick, practical action plan. They will learn how to stamp out the corrosive win-at-all-costs mentality; focus on the game, not just the score; reinforce behaviors that produce results; sustain energy and momentum; correct poor performance without drama; build productive relationships; and be the leader people want to work for. Today’s hypercompetitive economy has created tense, overextended workplaces. Keep it productive, rewarding and even fun with this one-stop success kit.

 
IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• Why Winning Well doesn’t mean perfection.
• Why you should emphasize behaviors, not the metrics scorecard.
• The four principles of managers who win well.
• How to lead meetings and make decisions that inspire your team.
• To help your team solve problems, double productivity and own their results.

 

Review: Never Split the Difference by Chris Voss

NeverSplitTheDifference_LgNever Split the Difference by Chris Voss

Never Split the Difference, a new book on negotiation, presents an alternative to Getting to Yes, the classic text by Roger Fisher and William Ury of Harvard. For author Chris Voss, the use of rational tools and techniques is not the most effective approach for negotiations. Instead, the key to success, especially in very dangerous negotiations, is tactical empathy, which he describes as “emotional intelligence on steroids.”

As reflected in the title of his book, Voss, the former lead international kidnapping negotiator for the FBI, did not develop his theories on negotiation in the halls of academia. An education that began as a beat cop on the mean streets of Kansas City continued as he joined the FBI and eventually traveled the world as the agency’s chief negotiator in the most dangerous situations. Somewhat surprisingly, one of the most valuable lessons he learned was not in a jungle negotiating with ruthless terrorists, but in the streets of Pittsburgh.

A drug dealer had kidnapped the girlfriend of another drug dealer. As Voss listened to the tapes of the two drug dealers talking, he heard the aggrieved dealer ask the kidnapper, “Hey, dog, how do I know she’s alright?” The kidnapper paused and then said, “Well, I’ll put her on the phone.”

Already an experienced negotiator, Voss recognized the power of that question. It was the prototype of what he would eventually call the “calibrated question,” a highly impactful tool because it gives the other side a sense of control even if they are doing what you want them to do. If the drug dealer had said, “Put her on the phone!” the other dealer would either have refused — because he didn’t want be controlled — or demanded
something in return. When responding to the question, “How do I know she’s alright,” the kidnapper feels in control because he is making the decision to put the hostage on the phone.

Calibrated questions reflect the philosophy of emotional intelligence on steroids. Never Split the Difference is filled with compelling, often harrowing stories that further illustrate the empathy-based techniques and approaches that Voss advocates.

To get reviews like this one delivered right to your inbox, sign up for our free monthly Executive Book Alert newsletter!

Register for our next FREE webinar + get a free e-book!

Big Ideas copy

Register for our next FREE Soundview Live webinar event and you’ll receive a free e-book of The Big Ideas That Will Unleash Your Human Performance

How to Unleash Millennials in the Workplace
[FREE EVENT]

Date: Thursday, July 28
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Jason Forrest

Register here for free!

The millennial generation is becoming the dominate population inside of corporations. The problem is, companies are struggling on how to maximize their productivity.

In this FREE webinar, How to Unleash Millennials in the Workplace, Jason Forrest will share with us how sales managers can help millennials reach their full potential by developing them into the best versions of themselves.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to increase retention of millennials.
  • How to drive profitability through millennials with coaching.
  • The management style needed to bring out the best in millennials.

 

How Companies Can Overcome the Pitfalls of Globalization

Global Vision by Robert Salomon

In an increasingly interconnected world, managers frequently turn to global markets as a means of achieving profitability and growth targets despite accumulating evidence that globalizing is fraught with risk. In the last 20 years alone, high-profile companies like Tesco, IKEA, AES and Walmart (among others) have been hobbled by globalization.

Global Vision offers a lens through which to view globalization in a new and compelling way, helping managers understand the risks associated with globalization while equipping them with the necessary tools to overcome those risks. Author Robert Salomon defines country institutions across political, economic and cultural dimensions and demonstrates how to measure them so that managers can estimate the risks that institutional differences pose to global companies. Global Vision will help unlock the mysteries of globalization using a framework and a tool –– Global Acumen –– that managers can immediately apply to successfully navigate globalization’s institutional hazards.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• How to assess institutional distance.
• How to make better-informed, smarter globalization decisions.
• How to select the appropriate mode of entry into foreign markets.
• How to optimally structure your global operations.

Don’t miss our next FREE webinar!

How to Unleash Millennials in the Workplace [FREE EVENT]

Date: Thursday, July 28
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Jason Forrest

Register for FREE 

The millennial generation is becoming the dominate population inside of corporations. The problem is, companies are struggling on how to maximize their productivity.

In this FREE webinar, How to Unleash Millennials in the Workplace, Jason Forrest will share with us how sales managers can help millennials reach their full potential by developing them into the best versions of themselves.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to increase retention of millennials.
  • How to drive profitability through millennials with coaching.
  • The management style needed to bring out the best in millennials.

Sharpen Your Role as Manager

Show Trust to Earn Trust

Trust is a lot like faith. You can have faith in people only if you don’t try to control their actions, Eric Chester points out in On Fire at Work. The moment you begin to monitor their every move, out goes that faith.

It’s no surprise that many employers don’t really trust their employees. After all, it’s the employer’s business, their department, their division at stake. It’s their butt on the line if something goes wrong.

Trust is the foundational element of any healthy relationship. For the relationship to work, both sides need some independence –– some autonomy –– lest they suffocate from too much smothering.

Where the problem comes in is when leaders want their employees to give their all while doing exactly what they’re told –– no more, no less.

In this day and age, some companies still expect employees to be humbly submissive and overly dependent on their managers’ orders and oversight. The way they see it, employees are like children: watched so they don’t misbehave. Halted in their tracks before they ever make a mistake. Employees arrive late, take long lunches, slack off, don’t care about what’s good for the company, and take every opportunity to exploit any chink in the carefully constructed corporate armor so they can kill time and goof off. Then to top it all off, they leave early if no one’s watching. The way managers see it, they have to crack the whip in order to keep the place from becoming a freewheeling fun fest or a sea of inertia.

Let’s be clear: Employees who behave and act this way do exist. Want them to do the jobs they were hired to do instead of breaking their backs to get the hell out of Dodge? Leaders who are seeking on-fire performance from their employees need to be the ones to lead the charge. They need to show trust in order to earn trust.

On-fire employees –– the kind you’re looking to hire and keep –– are looking for some latitude to make decisions in the workplace. The best companies in the world, in turn, trust and empower those employees to think and act on their own –– everyone wins!

Take the best elements of entrepreneurism –– independence, creativity, passion and a desire to succeed –– and match them with each employee’s day-to-day responsibilities. Then build a workplace environment where all of those employees perform as if it’s their own company. A culture of autonomy involves not just trust from the employer but also accountability from the employee.

It’s a two-way street. Telling employees they can start working in the way that fits them best without providing any guidance or overarching goals is like giving them permission to jump out of a plane without a ‘chute. Cultures that promote autonomy need employees to work toward targeted, concrete objectives –– priorities and deadlines set by the company or manager.

_________________________________________________________________________

Image of Executive Edge: Sharpen Your Role as ManagerTo get more strategic tips on how
you can become a better manager,
subscribe to our
EXECUTIVE EDGE 
publication today!

Developing Everyone in the Company: An Everyone Culture by Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey

AnEveryoneCulture_Lg

An Everyone Culture

The culture of Next Jump, an e-commerce tech company, is summarized in a catchy phrase: Better Me + Better You = Better Us. In other words, if I grow, develop and become more successful, and if I help you grow, develop and become more successful, then the entire organization becomes more successful (i.e., more profitable). Next Jump put some real weight behind the words through the structure of its compensation, which is 50/50: 50 percent of your pay depends on how you impacted revenues, and 50 percent depends on how you implemented the Better Me + Better You = Better Us culture.

Next Jump is one of three companies whose practices and philosophies are at the heart of An Everyone Culture by Robert Kegan and Lisa Laskow Lahey. (The other two featured companies are hedge fund Bridgewater Associates and movie theater conglomerate Decurion Corporation.) Kegan and Lahey call these companies Deliberately Developmental Organizations (DDOs). The core philosophy of a DDO is that a company’s success depends on everyone in the company having an opportunity to grow. For a DDO, development is not one of the features of the company. Deliberate development is the engine that drives the company forward, as vital and irreplaceable as the engine of an automobile.

There is no dearth of volumes describing the importance of putting your people first. And having presented its argument that developing people is the single most important function of a business, An Everyone Culture could easily tumble into a series of intuitive but motivating howto’s, which would probably include a chapter on listening with empathy. However, Kegan and Lahey are scientists, and building on their research on adult development, they have created a robust model for organization-wide development that incorporates three dimensions:

Aspiration. DDOs have a culture that relentlessly pushes people to grow, not only as employees but also as people. The authors call this the edge.

Communities. People must not only want to grow but must be enabled to grow, and that requires safe, trustworthy communities. The authors call this home.

Practices. The final dimension incorporates the actual development practices and routines of the organization. The authors call this the groove. Implementing these three dimensions requires a series of “discontinuous departures” — principles, practices and structures that represent a true departure from business as usual. A total of 12 discontinuous departures animate the DDO framework.

Click here for the full review, or sign up for our Executive Book Alert newsletter to receive FREE book reviews in your inbox every month!

Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World

DeepWorkDeep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It’s a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. Deep work will make you better at what you do and provide the sense of true fulfillment that comes from craftsmanship. In short, deep work is like a super power in our increasingly competitive 21st-century economy. And yet, most people have lost the ability to go deep –– spending their days instead in a frantic blur of email and social media, not even realizing there’s a better way.

In Deep Work, author and professor Cal Newport flips the narrative on impact in a connected age. Instead of arguing distraction is bad, he instead celebrates the power of its opposite. Dividing this book into two parts, he first makes the case that in almost any profession, cultivating a deep work ethic will produce massive benefits. He then presents a rigorous training regimen, presented as a series of four “rules,” for transforming your mind and habits to support this skill. A mix of cultural criticism and actionable advice, such as the claim that most serious professionals should quit social media and that you should practice being bored, Deep Work is an indispensable guide to anyone seeking focused success in a distracted world.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• Why deep work is valuable, rare and meaningful.
• Strategies to help you learn to embrace deep work.
• What it means to embrace boredom.
• To determine the true value of social media in your work and life.

11 Simple People Skills That Will Get You Everything You Want

TheArtofPeopleDave Kerpen, the author of The Art of People, has developed a remarkable career around a key skill: being likeable. Kerpen is the founder of a social-media software company called Likeable Local as well as co-founder of a branding consultancy called Likeable Media. In his first two books, Likeable Social Media and Likeable Business, Kerpen explained how being likeable, which emerges from listening, storytelling and building relationships, was key to success in online marketing and business, respectively.

In The Art of People, Kerpen expands the scope of his approach to success even further, laying out a step-by-step manual for likeability in all situations. As the title of his book eloquently conveys (perhaps the reason Kerpen released his grip on the “likeable” brand name), being likeable is about the “art” of people. Becoming likeable is not a mechanical exercise; it is not about learning how to manipulate people to achieve your ends. Likeability is driven by authentic and transparent emotions.

A Lesson in Authenticity

Kerpen tells the story of listening for 20 minutes (while waiting for his phone to charge) as a tipsy stranger at a New York City party described her life, her hopes and dreams, and her disappointments. Eventually, the phone was charged and Kerpen was ready to leave, at which point the stranger, whose name was Jackie, realized she had monopolized the conversation. “What about you?” she asked. “Are you traveling anywhere?” This question led Kerpen to describe an imminent trip to San Francisco and to ask, almost as a joke, whether she had any connections at a highly exclusive Napa Valley restaurant for which he had not been able to get reservations. Jackie, it turns out, did have personal connections at the restaurant and was able to get the sought-after reservations for Kerpen and his wife. The story is a lesson in authenticity. Kerpen did not “chat up” Jackie in order to use her influence with the restaurant. He certainly had no idea this New York City stranger would have connections to the world-famous Bay-area restaurant he was interested in. However, he had been genuinely interested in her stories and her frustrations. “I listened and connected and helped her feel less lonely, if only for a few moments, and that happened to lead to my getting exactly what I wanted most at the time,” he writes.

Click here to read the full review or sign up for our Executive Book Alert newsletter to receive FREE book reviews in your inbox every month!

Tools to Become an Authentic Leader

Join us for a Soundview Live webinar!

Date: Thursday, July 7th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Dr. Karissa Thacker

Some are born to lead, other must be taught, but all leaders must work to retain their own values and basic sense of self. When it comes to maintaining sustainable success in your organization, authenticity is key.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Tools to Become an Authentic Leader, Dr. Karissa Thacker will show you how to broaden and deepen your effectiveness by presenting the most appropriate side of yourself.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to become authentic in a way that befits your values
  • How to show loyalty, honesty, ethics, and consideration
  • How to maintain authenticity in leadership roles
  • How to make conscious choices instead of blind reactions

About the Speaker

Karissa Thacker is founder and president of Strategic Performance Solutions Inc., a management training and consulting firm dedicated to elevating people to reach their highest potential and career satisfaction. Over the past two decades Karissa has done just that for countless individuals, working with nearly half of the Fortune 500® companies to drive performance and leadership growth. She specializes in executive coaching and development that balances on-the-job performance with the need for sustained personal fulfillment.

 

Karissa is often quoted in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, Forbes, MSNBC, and many other major outlets, and is a sought-after authority on the subject of authentic leadership. Her articles have appeared in the Harvard Business Review, Business News Daily, and elsewhere.