Next Week – The Latest in Leadership

Next week, for Soundview Live webinars, we are privileged to have join us two teams of leadership experts. On February 3rd we’re hosting Scott Edinger and Laurie Sain, authors of The Hidden Leader, and on February 5th we’re hosting Bob and Gregg Vanourek, authors of Triple Crown Leadership.

Discovering and Developing Greatness
In this Soundview Live webinar, Scott Edinger and Laurie Sain cast a fresh eye on what it means to be a leader, with insights on how to locate and nurture the people who take initiative, act courageously, and get the job done right. These are hidden leaders whose everyday performances deliver the competitive advantage you need.

Triple Crown Leadership
In this Soundview Live webinar, Bob and Gregg Vanourek provide compelling leadership practices for building organizations that are excellent (achieve exceptional performance), ethical (do the right thing), and enduring (stand the test of time).

This is a great opportunity to bring together your leaders, and soon to be leaders, to hear the latest leadership principles. You will be able to ask your questions of the speakers during each session. These two webinars are sure to arouse some great questions about leadership and provide your staff with insight into their own potential.

As always, subscriber attend all Soundview Live webinars free as part of their subscription. But even if you’re not a subscriber, you’re welcome to attend for just $49 per session. For the price of two webinars you could also subscribe and get a full year of weekly webinars free.

Book Review: Becoming Your Best

Becoming_Your_Best

by Steven Shallenberger

With the high demands and pressures in today’s workplace, it seems you have to sacrifice your personal life for your job. However, Steven Shallenberger, states that as a leader you can succeed in business and live a happy life at the same time. In Becoming Your Best, Shallenberger reveals the 12 principles for developing a culture of excellence within your organization. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

In each chapter, Shallenberger explains the 12 principles in detail. Of the 12, the first principle “Be True to Your Character” refers to having a strong character. “It is best to be strong in the initial moment of choice, but if you blow it, you will often have an opportunity to make a correction. We all have moments of weakness and poor judgment, but the ability to self-correct is critical if we want to build a strong character and a life of fulfillment and meaning,” writes Shallenberger. These principles will help you reach your highest potential and drive the kind of innovation that turns good companies into industry leaders, all while living a well-balanced personal life.

The group of 12 principles is the common denominators that all successful leaders possess. Becoming Your Best will give you the knowledge and tools to not only improve your life as a leader, but the lives of your employees as well.

How Companies Must Adapt to Survive

THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES OF SOCIAL MEDIA

In A World Gone Social, social media entrepreneurs Ted Coiné and Mark Babbitt lay out the growing impact of social media on our lives and our businesses.

They begin by exploring how social media has shifted the power away from corporations and into the hands of their customers and their frontline employees. The power that social media has given customers is fast becoming legendary, as stories spread of how one unhappy customer is able to bring a corporation to its knees — well, at least send it scurrying for cover — by creating a maelstrom of discontent and bad publicity.

For example, the ill-advised Bank of America fees for services typically offered for free — such as having a debit card — created a social media-based firestorm of protest from customers, causing the financial services giant to reverse its position. The authors note that BoA’s initial reluctance to respond made the situation much worse than it had to be. The authors describe, in contrast, the response of Verizon, which made a similar ill-advised decision to put in a small fee on a traditionally free service. Unlike BoA, however, Verizon retreated as soon as resistance began to build.

Empowered Employees

Social media has also empowered employees. The authors tell the story of a minimum-wage Target worker who resisted a call to work on Thanksgiving and Black Friday. Her respectful open letter on social media to Target’s CEO went viral, and Target was put on the defensive. The retail giant crafted a careful response, noting that rather than resistance to the holiday work, there were more volunteers than shifts open for those who wanted to work on Thanksgiving. However, the response also stated that there was no corporate mandate to work on Thanksgiving, which clearly left open the opportunity for local Target managers to make Thanksgiving mandatory.

Another damaging threat comes from insulting or insensitive comments on social media from high-ranking employees, leading to what the authors call a “virtual lynch mob.” In one case described by the authors, one manager tweeted, “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get Aids. Just kidding. I’m white!” before boarding a plane to Africa. When the manager got off the plane, she learned that she had been fired — and that her dismissal had been publicly announced.

The transparency of social media puts the spotlight on corporations in ways that had never been possible, and corporations must respond accordingly, the authors write. For example, employee engagement is more vital than ever. An unhappy workforce has myriad options for venting their disapproval. (In one example, employees described in bloody detail — through the company’s own communications channel — the massive layoffs sweeping through the company and the impact on those who were being laid off. The marketing director finally became aware of the posts and eliminated them from the platforms, but the damage had been done.)

Going Flat

Social media presents challenges for corporations, but it also presents new opportunities, the authors write — although perhaps not necessarily or exclusively for corporations. In fact, one of the first rules of the social media age, according to the authors, is “the death of large.” Large, rigid corporations don’t have the agility to compete in today’s dynamic marketplaces.

Companies must go flat, the authors write. It’s time to lose the layers of middle managers. Communication must be direct, open and easy — which means it’s time to lose the old useless meetings that, according to the authors, “serve only the grandstanders and bureaucrats.” Going flat also means greater accountability from everyone. A case study of America’s largest tomato processing company shows that going flat is possible in even the most traditional industries far removed from the “knowledge” economy.

The effectiveness of crowdsourcing for solutions, the top priority that must be given to the customer experience and the requirement for leaders to be “social” — to know how to be a true and engaging presence on social media (tweets “from” the CEO actually created by PR employees don’t count) — are some of the other topics covered in this wake-up call to companies and leaders who are slow to embrace social.

How to Become an Expert Negotiator

You may be a high-ranking CEO or a first day salesman, a service provider or self-employed. If you face encounters with your partners, clients, suppliers or employees, in which you want them to think differently at the end of the meeting and actually do what you want – our next Soundview Live webinar is for YOU. The objective of this webinar, How to Become an Expert Negotiator with Daniel Weiser, is to improve your negotiation skills and to move you one step closer to closing your deal.

Here are 27 Negotiation Tips from Weiser’s book Become An Expert Negotiator:
#1: Ask about the other’s reference point at the beginning of the interaction.
#2: Find out if you’re both in the same “ballpark.”
#3: The status quo effect is the “mother” of many objections.
#4: Lower the perceived risk.
#5: State your purpose in order to lower the firewall.
#6: Don’t talk about a certain topic – before you know the other party is interested to listen about it.
#7: Don’t wait for an anticipated rejection – vaccinate against it.
#8: Adjust your communication style to that of your counterpart.
#9: Address what the term “partnership” means to your business partner.
#10: Pierce the firewall through Aikido.
#11: Don’t tell the other side what he will gain – ask him to speak about it.
#12: Establish that the deal is “fair” according to external objective criteria.
#13: Reframe the interpretation of the situation.
#14: Elicit statements that can later be used to support your position.
#15: Indicate others who made the same decision as the one requested in this negotiation.
#16: Use the rule of comparison often.
#17: It’s not about being nice – it’s about being similar.
#18: Be the first to give something.
#19: When you concede on an issue – request something in return.
#20: The foot in the door.
#21: Limit the time to respond to an offer.
#22: Present the upside potential, but also the downside of rejection.
#23: Feel successful and radiate it.
#24: Be specific about your references and success indicators.
#25: Talk about the fears of relevant others.
#26: Fulfill your negotiation partner’s needs and keep quiet about achieving yours.
#27: Sometimes, simply ask for help.

If you would like to hear more about these tips, join us on January 29th and bring your whole sales team. As we know, every little improvement in our negotiation skills could be the difference between getting the sale or not.

Three New Summaries to Lead Better

Leaders help themselves and their teams to do the right things. However, sometimes leaders need to re-think their vision or processes to improve their organizations. Leadership is about mapping out where you need to go as a team or an organization to be successful. Learn how to be a better leader by developing a culture of excellence within your organization, asking the right questions, and becoming a strategic thinker to “win” with these three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries.

Becoming_Your_Best

by Steven Shallenberger

Becoming Your Best by Steven Shallenberger. In Becoming Your Best, Steven Shallenberger, states that as a leader you can succeed in business and live a happy life at the same time. Shallenberger reveals the 12 principles for developing a culture of excellence within your organization. These principles will help you reach your highest potential and drive the kind of innovation that turns good companies into industry leaders, all while living a well-balanced personal life.

 

 

Good_Leaders_Ask_Great_Questions

by John C. Maxwell

Good Leaders Ask Great Questions by John C. Maxwell. To learn and grow into a successful leader, you need to yourself and your teams question, but the key is asking the right questions. John C. Maxwell presents the process of becoming a successful leader by examining how questions can be used to advantage, in Good Leaders Ask Great Questions. Maxwell shares leadership questions he has gathered from others and from his own experience that will inspire both seasoned leaders and new leaders to ask great questions to improve their leadership skills and careers.

 

Game_Changer

by David McAdams

Game-Changer by David McAdams. You can turn defeats into wins, if you have the vision to “change the game”. In Game-Changer, David McAdams uses game theory to out-strategize your rivals. McAdams discloses six basic ways to change games: commitment, regulation, cartelization, retaliation, trust and relationships. By learning to be a deeper strategic thinker, you’ll be able to “change the game” to plot business tactics and gain insights for your advantage.