How to Use Big Data to Win Customers, Beat Competitors, and Boost Profits

TAKING ADVANTAGE OF BIG DATA

When used car dealer Les Kelley launched the Kelley Blue Book, his target customers were used car dealers (and insurance companies and banks that made car loans). Dealers could consult the book and, based on the information it contained, have an idea of what price tag to put on their merchandise. Today, the target customers for the Kelley Blue Book, now free online, are used car buyers who consult it to have an idea of what they should pay for the used car they are buying.

The customer flip for Kelley’s Blue Book exemplifies the switch in power in the purchasing process from seller to buyer. Buyers are no longer dependent on sellers to give them the information they need to make a purchasing decision. So in this new purchasing paradigm, are sellers completely powerless?

The answer is no, and the reason, in large part, is what is commonly known as “big data.” As explained in The Big Data-Driven Business by LinkedIn marketing executives Russell Glass and Sean Callahan, in today’s world, buyers don’t have to go to sellers in order to find the information they need to make the right decisions. Instead, they can use a variety of digital search channels to gather any information they need and then approach the sellers.

However, write Glass and Callahan, the same digital capability that allows buyers to take the initiative allows sellers to follow what the buyers are doing. They track the websites and pages within those sites that buyers or potential buyers are visiting. They also track purchasing trends, which merchandise is popular at a given time, which items lead to the purchase of other items and a whole host of other customer-related data — so much data, in fact, that we now refer to all of this information as “big data.”

Such extensive tracking takes some sophisticated software, of course. This software, write Glass and Callahan, is what is known as the “marketing stack.”

The marketing stack includes marketing automation software, business intelligence databases, CRM systems, content management systems (which allow marketers to take over updating digital marketing content with minimal IT involvement), blogging and data management platforms, analytics tools, social media management platforms, search engine platforms, and other systems and software that, in essence, enable marketers to manage the accumulation and analysis of big data.

Principles for the Data-Driven Company

It may seem, from the litany of technological systems just cited, that establishing a big data-driven company is complex and expensive. It can indeed be complex. The chief marketing officer and the chief information officer must work closely together if a company is going to have any success at using big data. Some companies have started hiring “chief marketing technologists” solely responsible for the technology side of marketing. The bottom line is that all marketing professionals today must be at least knowledgeable about the technological components of the marketing function.

Using big data does not have to be expensive, however. In one of the most insightful chapters, Glass and Callahan offer 11 principles for successfully making a business more data-driven. Among the principles are, determine what you want to know about your customers and prospects; start small; don’t bet everything on technology (figure out first what you need, not what technology you want to use); and hire the right people — forget the art schools, and think about Star Trek conventions instead.

Glass, who heads B2B marketing at LinkedIn, and Callahan, LinkedIn’s senior manager for content marketing, present a guide for marketers in companies of all sizes.

Becoming YOUR Best, Not Someone Else’s

Is your company a mediocre company or an exceptional company? Today, the difference between mediocre and great is the difference between success and failure. So what exactly does it take to be exceptional?

No surprisingly, Steve Shallenberger says that business success starts with ourselves – with becoming our best. But he also says that becoming your best is not about comparing yourself to another person. It’s about becoming your best.

In Becoming Your Best: The 12 Principles of Highly Successful Leaders, Shallenberger reveals simple and entertaining ways to harness the power of these 12 principles. You discover how to make communication easier and clearer, live in greater peace and balance, more persuasively lead others with an inspiring vision, and how to embrace change—not fear it.

Shallenberger divides his principles into three thematic sections—Transformational Leadership, Transformational Teams & Relationships, and Transformational Living:

Transformational Leadership
• Be True to Character
• Lead with a Vision
• Manage with a Plan
• Prioritize Your Time

Transformational Teams & Relationships
• Live the Golden Rule in Business and Life
• Build and Maintain Trust
• Be an Effective Communicator
• Innovate Through Imagination

Transformational Living
• Be Accountable
• Apply the Power of Knowledge
• Live in Peace and Balance
• Never Give Up!

If you would like to learn more about these 12 principles, then you’re invited to join our Soundview Live webinar: How the BEST Leaders Ignite Energy and Fuel High Performance. This webinar will be packed with advice, tools, and examples for turning your thoughts into action, motivating yourself and your people, inspiring teams to solve problems creatively, and building the life you’ve always dreamed of.

You can also post questions directly to Steve during the webinar. We hope your will join us on March 10th and begin the journey to becoming your best.

Book Review: Bringing Strategy Back

BringingStrategyBack

by Jeffrey Sampler

When the world of business is so chaotic, leaders need strategy more than ever. However, the business environment is changing too quickly for conventional strategic planning processes. In Bringing Strategy Back, Sampler explains why strategy is more important than ever for your business. Strategy expert Jeffrey Sampler introduces four “strategic shock absorbers” that enable leaders to build resilient organizations that can withstand even the most unexpected global turbulence.

With four “strategic shock absorbers,” leaders all around the world at organizations of any size and type can build strong organizations that withstand chaos and instability. Based on the Sampler’s in-depth research into the world’s most unstable markets, these strategic shock absorbers work together in an ongoing process that can be applied to any organization: Accuracy, Agility, Momentum and Foresight. Of the four, agility helps leaders deliver with speed and flexibility in terms of strategic options. Leaders need to be able to act quickly using agility in unpredictable markets.

Businesses can’t afford to become stagnant in their strategic process in order to survive and thrive. Sampler says that giving up the old way of strategic planning can seem risky; however customizing the best approach for your business will make a positive difference. With this new framework, Bringing Strategy Back shows how to be prepared and proactive, rather than reactive, even when the future is uncertain.

Rediscovering the Art of Brand Marketing

MARKETING IN A DIGITAL WORLD

There are a lot of shiny objects in the world of marketing today. Traditional marketing channels such as television and print media ads are being outshone by the flashier marketing opportunities of the digital age, including big data mining and social media marketing. Many marketing experts happily sound the death knell of traditional marketing: television ads might have worked in the time of the giant television console with its rabbit ears, but this is the age of Hulu and Netflix.

In a new book titled Twitter Is Not a Strategy, Tom Doctoroff, CEO of J. Walter Thompson Asia, begs to differ. Given that global television advertising revenues are forecast to grow from $162 billion in 2012 to more than $200 billion in 2017, according to PriceWaterhouseCoopers, it seems a bit disingenuous, he writes, to say that television advertising is dead. The world is indeed changing, but it’s not a question of the past being replaced by the future.

As Doctoroff explains, traditional marketing was based on top-down positioning. The brands controlled the message and the channel, and customers were passive recipients. The digital age has given the customer more power in the process, which is now more bottom-up than top-down. Many marketing books tout this dichotomy as mutually exclusive; in other words, bottom-up has replaced top-down marketing. For Doctoroff, this is a false dichotomy. Marketing today is both bottom-up and top-down. That is why social media marketing is booming, but so is television ad purchasing.

Successful Marketing Today

The secret to successful marketing today, writes Doctoroff, is to know how to meld the two approaches together. “We must permit consumers to participate with brands without surrendering the ability to manage the message and what people say about their products,” he writes. The goal of marketers is to develop a life-long relationship between the brand and consumers.

To help companies enable customer engagement while managing the message, Doctoroff offers a framework for marketing based on four “interconnected modules.”

The first two modules are conceptual and focus on customer insight, on one hand, and the brand idea, on the other. No matter how much technology evolves, customer insight must remain at the core of marketing, he writes. Doctoroff describes the human truths shared by all and nation- or region-specific cultural truths, and explains how brands succeed when they can resolve the conflicts among and within these two sets of truths. Mont Blanc pens, for example, are very successful in China because, he writes, the luxury brand reconciles two competing cultural truths: “the desire to project accomplishments but also the need to be understated, to obey the rules.”

The brand idea, in Doctoroff’s words, “crystallizes the long-term relationship between consumer and brand that remains consistent yet evolves over time.” The brand idea emerges from the “fusion” between customer insight and a unique brand offer (UBO). The UBO, he writes, is based on product truths –– physical or emotional characteristics that differentiate the product, and brand truths, which build brand equity in the minds of consumers.

The executional modules of Doctoroff’s framework are engagement ideas, the ideas that will spark consumers to become engaged with the brand, and engagement planning, which is focused on bringing the brand into the lives of consumers. Successful engagement ideas connect to the three levels of passion, he writes: the individual-focused “me,” the community-focused “we” and the global-focused “the world.” For engagement planning, Doctoroff offers a step-by-step engagement system based on marketing communication at every step of the buying process: trigger (the unmet need), consideration, comparison, preference (choosing the brand), purchase and experience.

The core message of Twitter Is Not a Strategy is clearly conveyed when Doctoroff quotes Clive Sirkin, Kimberly-Clark’s global Chief Marketing Officer, who says, “We don’t believe in digital marketing. We believe in marketing in a digital world, and there’s a huge difference.” Twitter Is Not a Strategy also benefits from the global perspective that Doctoroff brings to the subject. His expertise in both China and emerging markets will be of immense value to companies looking to expand into these markets. Doctoroff has written a balanced, informed guide to branding in the 21st century.

You can sign up to receive free business book reviews every week by email with Soundview’s Executive Book Alert.

The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth

“How to be as weird as you want while providing a viable business structure to support it”

This is what Chris Brogan promises to those that read his latest book The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth.

Brogan continues “So, if you’re the kind of person who’s wanted to dig into entrepreneurship but hasn’t quite found the right way of hearing the story, this might be your book. It’s not about “the hustle” or “dominating” or “killing” anything. It’s about taking whatever makes you weird/different/unique/important to this universe, and helping you make a business interface that might help you do what you want to do a little better.”

So what is a freak, according to Brogan? Here’s is his definition:
• You don’t fit in without some serious effort.
• You are not a big fan of settling or compromising.
• You’re looking for ways to allow you weirdness to be an asset, and not as the deficit that people have tried to convince you it is.

If you fit that description, then you’ll want to join Chris Brogan and Soundview on March 3rd for a special Soundview Live webinar entitled, of course, The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth. You’ll have the opportunity to hear Chris talk about how freaks can be successful in business in their own unique way, and to ask your questions during the webinar.

If you think you may be a freak, the CEO of your own cubicle, or an employeepreneur, you won’t want to miss this live conversation with Chris. Register Today!