Friday Book Review! Thank You For Being Late

9780374273538In the latest book from influential New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations, readers are taken through a typical globe-spanning Friedman-esque journey of ideas, insights and, of course, people — many people of a wide variety of nationalities and perspectives, but all supporting in some way Friedman’s central theme: The world is speeding up — and that’s okay, as long as we all keep moving ourselves.


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Friedman compares thriving in today’s world to riding a bicycle: a bike is steady, upright and comfortable when you are moving; stop moving and you topple over. The way to keep moving is to embrace collaboration, pluralism, trust of others — and to not be afraid of change. “So many people today seem to be looking for someone to put on the brakes, to take a hammer to the forces of change — or just give them a simple answer to make their anxiety go away,” he writes. “It is time to redouble our efforts to close that anxiety gap with imagination and innovation and not scare tactics and simplistic solutions.”

Not that there isn’t good reason for trepidation. As Friedman notes, the most dangerous period on New York City streets occurred when cars started appearing but horse-and-buggies had not yet disappeared. We are currently in a similar transition period, with the world accelerating at such a rate that humans are having trouble adapting to the changes.

The Machine and The Supernova

In Thank You for Being Late, Friedman explores in detail the three accelerations driving “the machine” today — the machine being Friedman’s term for the “world’s biggest gears and pulleys [that] are shaping events.”

The first acceleration is in the domain of technology. When visiting the laboratories of the multinationals driving technology forward, Friedman writes, he feels a bit like James Bond visiting Q’s laboratory to discover the latest high-tech spy gadgets.

Except that the mechanical gadgets of Fleming’s hero have been replaced by what most people refer to as “the cloud” and what Friedman calls “the supernova.” Beginning in 2007, according to Friedman, the supernova started launching Moore’s law on the exponential increase in processing power into the stratosphere. Friedman uses the example of an information-technology multinational company based in the surprisingly named town of Batman, Turkey to exemplify how the supernova empowers innovators to reach everywhere from anywhere.

The second…(click here to continue reading this review)

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