Three Steps to Inspiring Passion and Performance

CommittedTeamsCommitted Teams: Three Steps to Inspiring Passion and Performance is based on a deceptively simple philosophy: set a direction, try to stay on track and make adjustments when necessary. Easy to do? Hardly –– especially when the typical workday is time-crunched, stressful and deadline-driven.

Drawing on research done at the Wharton School of Business, the authors reveal how to deliver results under these tough conditions. Committed Teams will help you gain buy-in for shared objectives, assign roles to the right people and establish norms for effective collaboration. Whether your team aims to execute a strategy, produce breakthrough innovations, collaborate across global boundaries or launch a new venture, this how-to guide offers the pragmatic advice you need. This game-changing book provides the tools for aligning every member of your team behind a motivating vision, making team meetings efficient and productive, and closing the gap between stated goals and actual behaviors.

If you want to be competitive in a demanding, fast-paced work environment, you need to rely on a high-performing team. Committed Teams is the indispensable resource for creating one.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• To establish goals, roles and norms in your organization.
• To adopt an observer’s mindset and solve problems.
• To bridge key gaps between saying and doing.
• To establish and strengthen culture in different types of teams –– even virtual teams and startups.

Review: #AskGaryVee by Gary Vaynerchuk

#AskGaryVeeGary Vaynerchuk is the prototypical social-media business success. The son of a wine shop owner, Vaynerchuk started a video blog called Wine Library TV — a quirky discussion about wine by a young man who loved the Jets and spoke about which wines fit best with Lucky Charms. Ten years later, Vaynerchuk is a highly successful social-media entrepreneur and, through his firm VaynerMedia, a sought-after consultant advising Fortune 500 companies. He is also a New York Times best-selling author. And since 2014, he is the host of #AskGaryVee, another YouTube show that, this time, is focused on helping his listeners succeed as entrepreneurs.

He brings that same mandate to his latest book, #AskGaryVee. Based on questions from his viewers, #AskGaryVee is a highly valuable primer on what works in social-media entrepreneurialism and in entrepreneurialism in general. For example, his advice to worry about the top line and not the bottom line when building a business (which aligns with his advice to solopreneurs that “cash is oxygen”) is compelling given Vaynerchuk’s meteoric rise to riches.

Of course, Vaynerchuk is first and foremost a social-media expert, and his concise overview of all the important social-media platforms that exist today is alone worth the price of the book. Another typically illuminating chapter is entitled “Content and Context,” in which he answers questions related to building compelling content and gaining exposure for that content.

For example, one viewer asked him how to get people to engage in a new and small channel. The answer: quality and hustle. “That’s all you can do: put out great content, engage with your tiny audience, and go out and try to get exposure for your content by collaborating or getting press or guest posting on someone else’s platform,” he writes. Many of the questions are quite specific. One viewer asks, for example, if he should avoid doing podcasts or videos because he has an accent. Vaynerchuk points to Google co-founder Sergey Brin and replies that accents should not stop the questioner (adding that if he doesn’t get an audience, it isn’t because of the accent). Another questioner asks whether short or long videos are better; Vaynerchuk answers that it doesn’t matter. He himself broke the commonly accepted “shorter-is-better” rule when he launched WLTV, which consisted of 40-minute videos.

Every chapter in #AskGaryVee is filled with this type of clear-cut, specific advice generated by the questions from his fans.

Click here to read the full review, or sign up for our FREE executive book alert to receive free book reviews in your inbox every month!

Don’t Miss Our Next Soundview Live Webinar!

Tools to Become an Authentic Leader

Date: Thursday, July 7th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Dr. Karissa Thacker

Click here to register

Some are born to lead, other must be taught, but all leaders must work to retain their own values and basic sense of self. When it comes to maintaining sustainable success in your organization, authenticity is key.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Tools to Become an Authentic Leader, Dr. Karissa Thacker will show you how to broaden and deepen your effectiveness by presenting the most appropriate side of yourself.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to become authentic in a way that befits your values
  • How to show loyalty, honesty, ethics, and consideration
  • How to maintain authenticity in leadership roles
  • How to make conscious choices instead of blind reactions

How to Maximize Engagement in Today’s Workforce

WhatMillennialsWantFromWorkMillennials have been burdened with a reputation as spoiled, lazy and entitled, but the reality behind the stereotype is far richer and more complex. Who are Millennials, what do they really want, and what can you do about it? Based on fieldwork and survey data from global research, What Millennials Want from Work paints a comprehensive, scientifically accurate picture of what really motivates Millennials around the world. Learn how to engage Millennials by improving workplace flexibility, because Millennials don’t separate life and work; providing adequate support and feedback, because Millennials like to learn and grow; coaching, not micromanaging, because Millennials value autonomy; designing competitive salary structures, because Millennials know what’s up; and providing opportunities to contribute to society, because Millennials care about doing good. In this essential book, Jennifer J. Deal and Alec Levenson explain who Millennials really are, and offer practical advice to help those who manage, lead, and work with Millennials, to improve teamwork, increase productivity, strengthen organizational culture and build a robust talent pipeline.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• Common misconceptions and realities about Millennials in the workplace.
• How Millennials can be both entitled and hardworking.
• The economic and social conditions that motivate and challenge Millennials at work.
• Practical tips for attracting, engaging and retaining Millennials.
• Important trends to help organizations plan for the future.

Review: The Go-Giver Leader by Bob Burg and John David Mann

TheGo-GiverLeaderAt first glance, the setup for Bob Burg and John David Mann’s fable, The Go-Giver Leader, seems to be only tangentially about leadership. The main protagonist, Ben, is trying to close an M&A deal: He has been charged by his company to persuade the leaders of an acquisition target — a manufacturer of high-quality chairs — to let his firm buy the company.

While Ben is not in a leadership position, the authors convincingly demonstrate that Ben’s assignment requires him to do what leaders must do if they are to be successful: convince others to take action because they want to. By not having the power over those he’s trying to convince, Ben’s situation accurately reflects the current state of leadership today: Your title doesn’t buy you respect, and a command-and-control leadership style leads to the disengagement of those you lead — and eventual failure as a leader.

When he first arrives on the scene, Ben is convinced that his success depends on “take, take, take”: taking control, taking charge of the situation, taking command.

As the book advances, Ben meets the four company executives he must convince to sell. These four executives are each portrayed as successful leaders who inspire their employees and managers. Each of these four also represents four different facets of leadership.

Allen, one of two brothers who co-founded the company, represents vision. Through his conversation with Allen, Ben learns that the challenge is not to have a vision but to keep people focused on the vision — what Allen describes as “holding the vision.” This facet of leadership is summarized as leading from the mind.

Augustine, the other brother, represents empathy, or leading from the heart. One of the key lessons Ben learns is that pull is more effective than push. Counterintuitively, the more you yield, the more power you have.

Frank, the VP of production who has been with the company since its founding, represents grounding — that is, getting the job done. The best leaders, Ben learns, are people who can actually do the work. The key attribute here is to lead from the gut.

Finally, Karen, the VP of Finance and Personnel, represents the soul of the company. Karen is very supportive of employees undergoing life-changing, personal challenges. Through Karen, Ben learns the importance of leading with your soul.

With the help of a mysterious mentor — the friend of a friend whom he meets for daily lunches in a local restaurant, Ben is able to develop his four keys to legendary leadership:

1) Hold the Vision, 2) Build Your People, 3) Do the Work and 4) Stand for Something. Ben, however, learns the fifth and decisive key to leadership — Practice Giving Leadership — on his own (with a little help from his mentor) at the turning-point moment in the book. Giving leadership is based on the philosophy that great leadership is never about the leader. You are not the “deal,” which is, in fact, the reverse of “lead.” At the climax, Ben discovers that, indeed, “the best way to increase your influence is to give it away.” Burg and Mann, authors of the best-seller The Go-Giver Leader, have written a compelling fable that succeeds as both a thought-provoking learning tool and, rather surprisingly, as a work of fiction with an unexpected plot twist at the end

Don’t forget – You can get free business book reviews delivered right to your inbox every month by signing up for our FREE Executive Book newsletter!

Don’t Miss Our FREE Webinar with Breck England! Tuesday, 6/21

Register now for our FREE webinar with Franklin Covey trainer, Breck England and receive a free summary of Primary Greatness!

How to Achieve a Life of Primary Greatness 
Date:
Tuesday, June 21, 2016
Time:
12:00 PM EST
Speaker:
Breck England

Event Description:

Stephen R. Covey believed there were only two ways to live: a life of primary greatness or a life of secondary greatness. Through his classic books and seminars, he taught that the intrinsic rewards of primary greatness—integrity, responsibility, and meaningful contribution—far outweighed the superficial rewards of secondary greatness—money, popularity, and the self-absorbed, pleasure-ridden life that some people consider “success.”

In this FREE Soundview Live webinar, How to Achieve a Life of Primary Greatness, seasoned instructor Breck England shares his expert knowledge of the classic Covey wisdom and the principles and methodology behind Primary Greatness.

SmartTip of the Month: How to Beat the Afternoon Slump

SmartTips

Watch the video

It is not uncommon to experience an energy drop and a general lack of motivation during the workday around mid-afternoon. This SmartTips video suggests ways to dodge the afternoon slump and basic preventative measures to help maintain a steady work pace.

Get more useful SmartTips delivered right to your inbox every month! Sign up for our FREE SmartTips newsletter!

 

Review: How to Have a Good Day by Caroline Webb

When someone would tell comedian George Carlin to “have a nice day,” Carlin would react angrily: “What if I don’t want to have a nice day?” Unlike Carlin, most of us would prefer to have nice days, but in our overworked, over-stressed and overbooked lives, it is not always easy. A new book by former McKinsey consultant Caroline Webb promises to come to our rescue. Entitled How to Have a Good Day: Harness the Power of Behavioral Science to Transform Your Working Life, it uses the advances in behavioral science, psychology and neuroscience to help us overcome or mitigate all of the stresses, setbacks and mishaps that create the many bad days or bad moments we endure.

The Essential Sciences

Webb begins her book with a quick look at three scientific advances that are key to understanding how we will be able to create a good day:
• The two-system brain. Our brains run two opposing systems in parallel, she explains. The deliberate system is our conscious thinking, slow and rational. The automatic system is subconscious, fast and instinctive. The deliberate system calculates a 15 percent tip; the automatic system makes us jump back before we are hit by a car.
• The mind-body loop. The mind and body are interconnected in ways we never realized. We knew happiness leads to a smile, but we did not know smiling (no matter how we feel) will make us happier.
• The discover-defend axis. We are constantly moving along an axis, anchored on one end by a defensive outlook, expecting attack at any moment, while anchored on the other end by a discovery mood, seeking out rewarding experiences.

 

Having laid the scientific groundwork,Webb then covers her seven building blocks of a good day:

Priorities: setting the intentional direction of the day.
Productivity: making the most of the hours of the day. Relationships: having positive, productive interactions.
Thinking: making wise choices, being creative and smart. Influence: maximizing the impact of what we say and do.
Resilience: overcoming setbacks and annoyances.
Energy: boosting enthusiasm and enjoyment.

Webb offers clear guidelines for each of the building blocks. Thus, for example, the section of the book on productivity includes chapters on single-tasking, planning deliberate down time, overcoming overload and beating procrastination. The chapters related to influence cover getting through their filters, making things happen and conveying confidence. Throughout the book, Webb carefully links the science introduced at the beginning to her directives. Down time increases productivity, for example, not only because a brain needs to rest but also because neuroscientists have discovered that the subconscious brain keeps working even when the conscious brain is at rest.

To read the full review, click here, or -better yet- sign up for our FREE Executive Book Alert newsletter to receive free reviews every month!

Join us for our next Soundview Live webinar! 6/16 featuring Dan Pontefract

Building Purpose into You, Your Role and Your Organization

Date: Thursday, June 16th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Dan Pontefract

Click here to register!

A business leader that is committed to purpose will create purpose for the organization. An employee that feels his/her personal sense of purpose is being fulfilled at work will be an invaluable asset to productivity and success. An organization centered on purpose will benefit every stakeholder, from employees to society in general.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Building Purpose into You, Your Role and Your Organization, Dan Pontefract discusses the three crucial areas of purpose: personal, organizational and your workplace role. If all three can come to fruition–if there is a positive interconnection between the three distinct definitions of purpose–the benefits should be felt by employees, teams, the organization, customers, and perhaps most importantly, society as a whole.

What You’ll Learn:

  • To improve the three crucial areas of purpose in your organization.
  • To find the balanced state or “sweet spot” to avoid disengagement, apathy, lack of growth and even bankruptcy in your organization
  • Both leaders and employees can achieve a purpose mindset on a personal level

Deconstructing a Problematic Workplace

42956656Manage Resistance and Drama

You may think the real drama at home is about the fight you had with your spouse, but it’s really about all the times you avoided having the difficult conversation, failing to listen or speak your truth to others or even yourself, Marlene Chism points out in Stop Workplace Drama.

Drama impacts all of us –– both at home and at work. It hampers productivity and inhibits personal effectiveness. And the worst part, of course, is that if you can’t spot the drama, you can’t stop the drama. Nonetheless, most of us try to fix the symptoms instead of identifying the core issues. The drama is the situation. Your drama is how you react to it. Therefore, while you may not be able to stop the drama, you certainly can stop your drama. In other words, you may or may not be able to control or change the circumstance, but with some training, you can learn to manage –– and alter –– your response.

When trying to identify the common elements in drama, you will always find at least one, if not all three, of these core components:
1. A lack of clarity.
2. A relationship issue.
3. Resistance. Leaders face resistance on a daily basis.

Teams resist working together. Individuals resist change. Perhaps you even resist the most difficult parts of your job. The core of resistance is you avoid because you don’t want to face whatever it is that you don’t want to face. You complain because you can’t deal with a certain situation, or you justify an angry outburst because you cannot accept the hand that has been dealt to you. Complaining denotes an unwillingness or inability to let go of what can’t be controlled, or to face and act on what can be changed.

The premise of releasing resistance is this: You cannot solve a problem until you accept the situation. When you jump into a solution before releasing resistance, you will just experience more drama. The solution only comes after you let go of your resistance. The four main energy patterns of resistance are blame, resentment, justification and judgment. Resistance is always a state of nonacceptance and an avoidance of responsibility. Non-acceptance starts as a thought impulse such as, “I don’t want to go through this (fill in the blank).” That thought triggers an emotional response such as frustration, dread, irritation or guilt, then quickly materializes into more observable behaviors such as angry outbursts, finger-pointing, blaming as well as subtle behaviors such as avoidance and procrastination.

In the end, resistance boils down to an unconscious avoidance of responsibility, which spirals into negativity, then finally into full-blown drama. Managers or business owners frequently know and even admit that drama is present in their workplaces. Denial is the drug of choice for many of us when we face difficult choices.

Awakening from the drug of denial can be painful. When you shed light on another person’s incompetence, rude behavior or pattern of which the person was unaware, the person will become defensive. Your staff member may feel attacked or belittled, so make sure you approach these issues with kid gloves.

Observe these two rules:
• Never catch anyone off guard.
• Always correct in private, and do it within a positive, team-oriented approach, with the intention of bringing out the employee’s best.

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