Book Review: Becoming Your Best

Becoming_Your_Best

by Steven Shallenberger

With the high demands and pressures in today’s workplace, it seems you have to sacrifice your personal life for your job. However, Steven Shallenberger, states that as a leader you can succeed in business and live a happy life at the same time. In Becoming Your Best, Shallenberger reveals the 12 principles for developing a culture of excellence within your organization. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

In each chapter, Shallenberger explains the 12 principles in detail. Of the 12, the first principle “Be True to Your Character” refers to having a strong character. “It is best to be strong in the initial moment of choice, but if you blow it, you will often have an opportunity to make a correction. We all have moments of weakness and poor judgment, but the ability to self-correct is critical if we want to build a strong character and a life of fulfillment and meaning,” writes Shallenberger. These principles will help you reach your highest potential and drive the kind of innovation that turns good companies into industry leaders, all while living a well-balanced personal life.

The group of 12 principles is the common denominators that all successful leaders possess. Becoming Your Best will give you the knowledge and tools to not only improve your life as a leader, but the lives of your employees as well.

Three New Summaries to Lead Better

Leaders help themselves and their teams to do the right things. However, sometimes leaders need to re-think their vision or processes to improve their organizations. Leadership is about mapping out where you need to go as a team or an organization to be successful. Learn how to be a better leader by developing a culture of excellence within your organization, asking the right questions, and becoming a strategic thinker to “win” with these three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries.

Becoming_Your_Best

by Steven Shallenberger

Becoming Your Best by Steven Shallenberger. In Becoming Your Best, Steven Shallenberger, states that as a leader you can succeed in business and live a happy life at the same time. Shallenberger reveals the 12 principles for developing a culture of excellence within your organization. These principles will help you reach your highest potential and drive the kind of innovation that turns good companies into industry leaders, all while living a well-balanced personal life.

 

 

Good_Leaders_Ask_Great_Questions

by John C. Maxwell

Good Leaders Ask Great Questions by John C. Maxwell. To learn and grow into a successful leader, you need to yourself and your teams question, but the key is asking the right questions. John C. Maxwell presents the process of becoming a successful leader by examining how questions can be used to advantage, in Good Leaders Ask Great Questions. Maxwell shares leadership questions he has gathered from others and from his own experience that will inspire both seasoned leaders and new leaders to ask great questions to improve their leadership skills and careers.

 

Game_Changer

by David McAdams

Game-Changer by David McAdams. You can turn defeats into wins, if you have the vision to “change the game”. In Game-Changer, David McAdams uses game theory to out-strategize your rivals. McAdams discloses six basic ways to change games: commitment, regulation, cartelization, retaliation, trust and relationships. By learning to be a deeper strategic thinker, you’ll be able to “change the game” to plot business tactics and gain insights for your advantage.

Four Thoughts to Chart Your Course in 2015

Soundview Author Insight Interviews are great additions to many Soundview Executive Book Summaries. In each interview, authors have the opportunity to reveal new interpretations or insights on their material. Soundview subscribers are often provided with exclusive insights drawn from the author’s direct application of his or her work with global companies.

Here are four great thoughts to consider as you chart your organization’s course for this year:

“If someone says ‘You’ve got to close the deal more efficiently,’ that could mean completely different things. The first task when you’re receiving feedback is to notice how general a lot of the feedback is. If someone says ‘close the deal more efficiently’ or ‘be more assertive,” rather than filling it in on your own, you’ve got to ask. You have to follow up and say, ‘Okay, so, you’re noticing that I’m not being as assertive as you think I could be. Can you go into some more detail? Give me a sense of what you’ve noticed me doing. What could I do that would be better from your point of view?’” – Douglas Stone, co-author (with Sheila Heen) of Thanks for the Feedback.

“What happens is that many successful people fall into the success trap. The trap is they believe success is a permanent condition, as if you’ve arrived and you’ll always be there. The reality is that success happens in the context of many external factors. Today, those factors are changing at a rate like none other in history. What happens is that if we believe that we’ve arrived and we can simply cling to the previous ideas and maintain the status quo and expect to enjoy the same level of success, we’re only kidding ourselves and setting ourselves up for disaster. The best of the best, the companies and the individuals that sustain success over time, are the ones that reinvent early and often.” – Josh Linkner, author of The Road to Reinvention.

“If you think of your organization as a funnel where time and talent and money are poured, they come together through processes and behavior, and the choke point in that funnel is emotion. Certainly, I experienced it when I was running divisions of companies and then later on as an owner of my own business, often because we had not been clear about our purpose. We had not been clear with others about what we expected of them. Because of that lack of clarity, combined with the emotion, that creates a real choke point for organizations.” – Greg Bustin, author of Accountability.

“One of the ways we [break the cycle of constant feature updates] is to get back in touch with the needs or jobs to be done for our customers. Oftentimes, there’s new product line extensions and new bells and whistles added to products which only usually increases the complexity of the product. It doesn’t serve the customer’s true need. The common core of both strategy and innovation is insight. The insight for most businesspeople is what’s going to drive the most value for customers.” – Rich Howarth, author of Elevate.

Book Review: Rookie Smarts

rookie smarts

by Liz Wiseman

When you’re inexperienced in business, you’re more likely to seek counsel or ask questions. However, you tend to lose that curiosity once you are established in the workplace. Leadership expert Liz Wiseman explains why it’s often an asset to be completely inexperienced and how to cultivate the curious, flexible, youthful mindset of a rookie. In Rookie Smarts, Wiseman addresses how to remain current and relevant as a leader with continuous learning. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

“Rookies are more capable than we might expect. We often see it on the athletic field, but it also plays out in the halls of the workplace. Research suggests that, in many cases, inexperience can work to your advantage: It can spark a dazzling performance and help you compete with, if not surpass, even the most talented, experienced players. Not only does inexperience confer an advantage, but also it is desperately needed in today’s rapidly evolving world of work,” writes Wiseman. She presents her research of more than 400 workplace scenarios in what she calls the “rookie smart mindset” that is characterized by four distinct modes: Backpacker, Hunter-Gatherer, Firewalker, and Pioneer. Each mode includes detailed descriptions of the best assets of each of these types.

She also presents “perpetual rookies” who are leaders who maintain a rookie mindset. If you are willing to unlearn and relearn, Rookie Smarts will help leaders gain a state of mind to succeed in today’s competitive work environment.

Book Review: The Reciprocity Advantage

the reciprocity advantage

by Bob Johansen and Karl Ronn

With all the technological and social disruptions that are occurring, companies can find partners to create new growth. Leading forecaster Bob Johansen and business developer Karl Ronn share a model for creating new growth for your business using the underutilized resources you already own that you can share with others in The Reciprocity Advantage. Johansen and Ronn describe how to collaborate on what you can’t do alone. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

“Right-of-way is an unrealized opportunity space where you can create a new large-scale practice of exchanging with others for mutual benefit. Right-of-way is the space within which you can create your reciprocity advantage. Indeed, a reciprocity advantage becomes possible only within your right-of-way,” write Johansen and Ronn. They present a three-step process for uncovering your right-of-way. The first step is Agree on Your Core Business by defining what industry you are in and what makes most of your profits.  The other steps are Reinvent your Business as a Service and Redefine Your Business as an Experience.

The Reciprocity Advantage shows readers how to leverage new forces like cloud-served supercomputing into scalable and profitable growth for your organization. You will learn why reciprocity will be the key to your organization’s growth in the future.