New Summaries to Improve Your Skills

The ability to carry out our positions in the most effective and efficient way is often neglected in order to get the job done on time. However it is important to your career and organization to reflect on how processes can be done better or more effectively. Developing skills that can be applied to both your professional and personal life can lead to your highest potential. Learn how to improve your skills by being a better motivator, better communicator, and take better risks with these three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries.

pitch_perfect

by Bill McGowan and
Alisa Bowman

Pitch Perfect by Bill McGowan and Alisa Bowman

In our professional and personal lives, situations rest on how well we communicate. Bill McGowan, media guru and correspondent, teaches you how to get your message across and get what you want with pitch perfect communication. In Pitch Perfect, McGowan shows you how to construct the right message and deliver it using the right language, verbally and nonverbally. Throughout the book, he distills his ideas into seven principles leading readers to effective communication.

 

why_motivating_people

by Susan Fowler

Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does by Susan Fowler

Top leadership researcher, consultant, and coach Susan Fowler suggests stop trying to motivate people because it doesn’t work. In Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does, Fowler builds upon scientific research on human motivation to present readers a model that will help leaders guide their employees toward motivation that not only increases productivity and engagement but that gives them a sense of purpose and fulfillment. Knowing what doesn’t work, why it doesn’t work, and what does will help leaders bring change in their organizations.

 

little_bets

by Peter Sims

Little Bets by Peter Sims

It is always rewarding when you take a risk and it pays off. In Little Bets, bestselling Peter Sims found that rather than start with a big idea or plan a whole project in advance, you should make a methodical series of little bets, low-risk actions taken to test an idea. This book offers readers a new way to explore and develop new possibilities with engaging accounts of innovators around the world who capitalized off their little bets.

Book Review: How the World Sees You

How_the_World_Sees_You

by Sally Hogshead

In the professional world, you need to set yourself apart from the crowd to make a great first impression. You already know how you see yourself. However, do you know how the world sees you? According to Sally Hogshead in How the World Sees You, once you know what makes you valuable to others, you are more able to make a positive impression. Hogshead presents a systematic method to describe yourself in just two or three words. Readers will gain why it is necessary to know their highest value and how to discover it. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

“As conversations become more compressed and the marketplace more crowded, you need to know how others see you and respond to you. Rather than just knowing your strengths, you need to know your differences,” writes Hogshead. She explains there are seven Fascination Advantages to communicate successfully. Each Advantage has a different approach to fascinating others and building relationships. Knowing your primary Advantage will help you intentionally apply it to communicate more effectively. Once you can tap into your Advantage, you’ll become more valuable to colleagues and/or clients leading to more success.

Beyond finding out what your advantage is, you will also learn how to construct your Anthem. Your Anthem is the tagline for your personality to use as your mission statement or to captivate your audience. Much like a company’s tagline, your Anthem will tell others what makes you unique from others. With How the World Sees You, professionals at every level will increase their ability to communicate messages and develop relationships effectively and confidently.

Do You Have Rookie Smarts?

For many years now, I have considered my greatest strength as an employee to be my experience. As young people join our company, I can tell them about our history of 36 years in the summary business and all that we’ve learned over the years. But these days, things are just moving way too fast for experience to be enough!

Liz Wiseman, in her book Rookie Smarts, has it right when she makes the point that “In a time of constant change, success depends on seeing the world through rookie eyes”. Wiseman explains why we are often at our best when we are doing something for the first time—and how to reclaim and cultivate this curious, flexible, youthful mindset called “Rookie Smarts”.

Fortunately for those of us who’ve been around for a while, Wiseman also identifies a brand of leader she calls a “perpetual rookie”. Despite years of experience, they retain their rookie smarts, thinking and operating with the mindsets and practices of these high-performing rookies.

Whether you are a true rookie looking to stand out at work, or a seasoned veteran who needs to keep up your game, Wiseman’s words are for you. So we’ve invited Liz to join us for our Soundview Live webinar How to Retain Your Rookie Smarts on November 5th.

I’ll certainly be listening in, and I would invite you to join me. If you’re a Soundview subscriber, you can attend the webinar Free as always. If you’re not yet a subscriber, you may want to consider subscribing now. For the cost of just two webinars, you’ll have a year of book summaries and can attend our weekly webinars free as well.

New Summaries to Transform Your Business

Today in the United States, entrepreneurship and innovation are driving economic growth. Creativity, entrepreneurs and innovation are all important. Entrepreneurs have a passion for business and focus on their products. To develop these products, they need to apply creativity and innovation to their processes. Learn how ideas, talents, and skills are developed and transformed into commercial and social ventures with these three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries.

The_Responsible_Entrepreneur

by Carol Sanford

The Responsible Entrepreneur by Carol Sanford

Responsible entrepreneurs seek to transform industries, requiring them to think and do beyond what is require of business leaders. Carol Sanford provides the frameworks to build a business and to evaluate and direct investments to create the greatest benefit for all stakeholders. She presents the four archetypes for entrepreneurs to use to learn how to grow their businesses. The Responsible Entrepreneur is not just for entrepreneurs or investors, but anyone who wants to make a difference in their organization.

How_the_World_Sees_You

by Sally Hogshead

How the World Sees You by Sally Hogshead

To set yourself apart from the crowd, you must develop your own personal brand. Sally Hogshead gives you the tools to describe your personality’s highest value to others in How the World Sees You. You will be able to create better relationships, grow your business, and become more valuable once you understand how to leverage how the world sees you at your best. How the World Sees You will guide you to make a great first impression always.

 

Overfished_Ocean_Strategy

by Nadya Zhexembayeva

Overfished Ocean Strategy by Nadya Zhexembayeva

When resources are depleting rapidly, businesses need to make resource scarcity, also referred to as the overfished ocean, their top strategic consideration. In Overfished Ocean Strategy, Nadya Zhexembayeva shows how businesses can find new opportunities in what were once considered useless by-products and develop ways to rapidly refine these new business models. She offers five essential principles that define the Overfished Ocean Strategy, along with several examples of how companies across the globe are implementing this strategy effectively.

Find the Sideways Path to Success

It takes 10 years of hard work and persistence to become an overnight success. Or so says the conventional wisdom. But if you’re going to insist on paying your dues, writes Shane Snow in the book Smartcuts, move to the slow lane because there are people who are going to pass you by. In his book, New York-based journalist Snow insists that the smartest people are the ones who refuse to follow the traditional paths to success. Snow uses examples from a wide range of domains, including entertainment, medicine, sports, politics and history, to prove that anyone can propel their way to success in a fraction of the time that others will take.

The secret of Smartcuts (which Snow explains lead to “sustainable success achieved quickly” not the “rapid but short-term gains” of shortcuts) is lateral thinking: knowing how to scramble sideways rather than steadily climbing the ladder of success. Even most presidents of the United States didn’t become president by slowly moving up from political offices to more important political offices until they reached the most powerful political office in the world. Instead, it often took just a couple of bounces from careers in such non-political arenas as acting (Ronald Reagan), the military (Dwight Eisenhower) or academia (Woodrow Wilson) to reach the White House.

Shorten, Leverage or Soar

In his book, Snow identifies nine patterns of lateral thinking, which he divides into three classes evocatively entitled: “shorten,” “leverage” and “soar.”

Instead of gamely following the prescribed path to a destination, some people deliberately shorten the path.

There are, Snow explains in the first part of the book, three ways to do so: “hacking the ladder,” which involves climbing a career ladder in unconventional ways; “training with masters,” which requires developing deep relationship with mentors; and “rapid feedback,” through which ambitious people constantly receive and act on feedback to what they are doing.

Leverage, as the name implies, is the process of using some tool or mechanism to propel yourself toward your goals.The three leverage tools that Snow features are “platforms,” which, as with physical platforms, make you stand out and above the rest of the crowds; “waves,” which, if you place yourself in the right location, can be caught and ridden, much as champion surfers know to which spot they should paddle to catch the best next wave; and “superconnectors,” which involves both getting help from the right people but then offering help once you’ve made it.

Snow’s final category of lateral thinking is to soar, which involves finding the way to keep “momentum”; striving for “simplicity” (a surprising element of sustainable success is the ability to focus on what’s important and simplify the rest; even President Obama has suits in only two colors, explaining to one interviewer that he had enough decisions to make); and 10x thinking — a goal that, unlike the incremental 10 percent improvement thinking, requires starting over doing something completely different.

Nearly every page of this book tells another compelling and inspirational story of someone who has been able to smartcut his or her way to phenomenal success. This is a book for anyone who feels that they are not where they want to be — and don’t have the patience (and perhaps the time) to slowly climb the ladder rung-by-rung.