10 Rules for Mastering Disruption in Recruiting and Engaging Employees

The-Future-Workplace-Experience-3D-652x1024Disruptive technologies. The gig economy. Breadwinner moms. Data-driven recruiting. Personalized learning. The Future Workplace Experience presents an actionable framework for meeting today’s toughest business disruptions head-on. It guides you step by step through the process of recruiting top employees and building an engaged culture, one that will drive your company to long-term success. Two of today’s leading voices on the future of work, Jeanne C. Meister and Kevin J. Mulcahy, provide 10 rules for rethinking, reimagining and reinventing your organization. Everything we took for granted in the past, from what we expect from our jobs to whom we work with and how, is changing before our eyes. The strongest organizations today are “learning machines.” New challenges require new solutions, and some organizations are finding them. If you want to compete in the years to come, you have to meet the future now. The Future Workplace Experience is your playbook for taking your organization to the top of your industry.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• The 10 rules to help your organization recruit and engage the best employees.
• What workers expect from work and how and why companies are creating employee experiences to mirror their best customer experiences.
• How technology transforms the workplace and can be both an enabler and a disruptor.
• The changing composition of the workforce driven by gender, generation and the gig economy.

Friday Book Review! The Analytical Marketer by Adele Sweetwood

TheAnalyticalMarketer_3D-237x290In her illuminating book, The Analytical Marketer: How to Transform Your Marketing Organization, author Adele Sweetwood, Senior Vice President of Global Marketing of analytic software giant SAS, tells the story of a large business-to-consumer prospect who came to SAS for information about customer intelligence software. SAS marketers sent representatives from the prospect more than 30 emails during a 90-day period. Unfortunately, none of them had anything to do with CI solutions but were focused instead on Big Data solutions and user-group meetings for other product offerings. These emails kept coming even after the prospect company had informed SAS that it had decided to use a competitor’s solution.

What went wrong? According to Sweetwood, SAS completely fumbled this opportunity because, she writes, “what we had failed to recognize was that this particular customer was in his ‘decide’ phase, meaning he was ready to choose a vendor to work with. Yet we were treating the customer as if he was still unsure about what he needed.”

The Customer Decision Journey

For Sweetwood, marketing analytics is not about the accumulation of big data. It is about knowing how to leverage this data to engage the customer in a personalized marketing conversation, one that is centered around who they are and what they need — or what she calls the customer-decision journey.

Today, Sweetwood writes, the customer-decision journey is not the company-driven process it used to be. Customers have the tools and data available to be the drivers of the process. They are the ones who control their interactions with the company. “That means,” she writes, “that how you as an organization respond to new customers — while nurturing and retaining existing customers — has also changed.”

Specifically, she writes, companies must 1) understand the decision or experience the journey of their customers, 2) identify a prospect’s location on this journey and, finally, 3) “leverage the data and analytics to tell your customer’s story and listen to it.”

For example…(click here to continue reading this review)

Join us for our next Free webinar – Tuesday, 1/24!

111602_Learning for the Long Run_1507 Practices for Building a Resilient Learning Organization

Date: Tuesday, January 24
Time: 1:00 PM ET
Speaker: Holly Burkett

Click here to register for this free webinar!

In this Soundview Live webinar, 7 Practices for Building a Resilient Learning Organization, innovative change leader and Learning for the Long Run author Holly Burkett, describes how to build the kind of sustainable learning culture that engages talent, sparks innovation, and optimizes performance, despite the churn of constant change.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Seven practices for building a resilient learning organization.
  • How continuous learning drives business strategy.
  • How exemplar learning leaders build individual and organizational resilience.
  • How to assess the resiliency of your own learning enterprise.

HRCI Credits available: 1*
*For those seeking HRCI certification, you will receive the required activity code in the follow-up email, post-event.

The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice

ihwx.af499a77-ad19-4ec7-9813-561d73345847.200.175Innovation strategy and growth expert Clayton M. Christensen, and his co-authors Taddy Hall, Karen Dillon and David Duncan, present a new conceptual framework for products and innovation based on their conclusion that customers don’t “buy” products or services; they “hire” them to do a job. This Theory of Jobs suggests that understanding customers is not the driver of innovation – understanding customer jobs is. By understanding what causes customers to “hire” a product or service, any business can improve its innovation track record, creating products that customers not only want to hire, but that they’ll pay premium prices to bring into their lives. Competing Against Luck explains the framework and how to use it in your organization.

In this 8-page text and 20-minute audio summary of Competing Against Luck, you will learn:

  • An exciting new conceptual framework for products and innovation.
  • Why it makes more sense to focus on progress rather than products.
  • The pitfalls of relying on traditional consumer data.
  • How to understand and apply the Theory of Jobs to your organization.

Friday Book Review! Be the Business by Martha Heller

heller-book-excerpt2-100684008-primary.idgeThe information-age tidal wave has submerged our companies and organizations. If the IT department was once contained in a room where brainy technologists worked their magic, today every office, every desk, every employee and manager — and every customer! — is involved with the company’s information technology.

In many ways, this new digital era (“new” relative to eras, of course) has not changed the core mandate of most executives and managers. What has changed is how that mandate is fulfilled. At the C-suite level, for example, the CEO must still guide strategy, instill a culture, lead his or her top management team, and take responsibility for the successes and failures of the company. The Chief Marketing Officer is responsible for the successful positioning of the company’s products in the marketplace. The Chief Operating Officer (COO) is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the company.

The role of the Chief Information Officer, however, has been dramatically altered. In her thoughtful new book, Be the Business: CIOs in the New Era of IT, Martha Heller explains the challenges and opportunities that CIOs must face and embrace. The book’s title — as spare and relevant as her chapters — tells the story: CIOs must “be the business.” Information technology is in every nook and cranny of a business. Information technology is back office and front office and connecting the two. Information technology is about digital marketing but also — as one CIO tells Heller — about turning operations into “algorithms.”

CDOs Are Not the Solution

Today’s organizations recognize the omnipresence of information technology in every department and function. One response, according to Heller, is the creation of a new Chief Digital Officer (CDO) function — in essence, relegating the CIO to the operational side of information technology as the fancy new CDO occupies himself or herself with the strategic implications of the digital age. Unfortunately, CDOs are often glorified CMOs — they understand the digital contribution to marketing but do not have a complete end-to-end grasp of the organization…(to continue reading this review, click here).

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Friday Book Review! Master Your Time, Master Your Life by Brian Tracy

Image result for brian tracy master your time master your lifeSuccess guru Brian Tracy’s new book is centered on the concept of time. Although each chapter has the word “time” in it, Master Your Time, Master Your Life is not about time management as much as it is about life goals and on what areas to focus your efforts.

The first chapter, for example, is about “Strategic Planning and Goal Setting Time.” Successful people, Tracy writes, are those who plan their strategy and select their goals. “One of the most important types of time is the time you spend thinking, deciding and planning how to achieve the things you really want in life.”

Tracy recommends establishing a personal strategic plan based on four questions:

  • Where am I now in my life? Review your accomplishments, family situation, financial situation, and health and fitness.
  • How did I get to where I am today? Identify the choices and decisions that led to where you are today. Recognize the sources of your successes — and setbacks.
  • Where do I want to go in the future? Imagine a perfect life five years in the future. Get into the details of how it would be different from the present.
  • How can I get from where I am to where I want to be? Identify what you need to be doing today to make that ideal future become a reality.

Some of the chapters, such as “Productive Time” and “Work Time,” involve more conventional time management suggestions.

In the “Work Time” chapter, Tracy dives into how to overcome the “seven major time wasters” at work (telephone, email and text interruptions; unexpected visitors; meetings; fire fighting; procrastination; socializing and idle conversations; and indecision and delay).

In the “Productive Time” chapter, Tracy highlights the three keys to productivity:

  • Clarity. Tracy’s focus here is on a clear understanding of expected results — the production part of productivity. Exactly what will make people see you as dependable and valuable?
  • Focus. Productivity depends on a single-minded focus on the task at hand. Multitasking productivity, writes Tracy, is a myth.
  • Concentration. Being able to concentrate for extended periods of time is a difficult but vital skill, he writes.

To read this review in full, click here. Don’t forget to sign up for our FREE Executive Book Alert newsletter to receive reviews just like this one every month right to your inbox!

 

Upcoming Webinar: What Hackers and Punks Can Teach Us About Navigating the New Normal

featuring Geoffrey Colon
Thursday, January 12, 2017
1:00 PM EST
Register here

Technology hasn’t just reshaped mass media, it’s altering behavior as well. And getting through to customers will take some radical rethinking.

Toss the linear plan, strip away conventions, and join Soundview Live for our webinar, What Hackers & Punks Can Teach Us About Navigating the New Normal with Geoffrey Colon, on a provocative, fast-paced tour of our changing world.

Packed with trends, predictions, and stories from a career spent pushing boundaries, this event will propel you out of your comfort zone and into the disruptive mindset you need for future success.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Where selling is dead, but ongoing conversation thrives
  • Where consumers generate the best content about brands
  • Where people tune out noise and listen to feelings
  • Where curiosity leads the marketing team
  • Where growth depends on merging analytics with boundless creativity

Learning Leadership by James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner

1119144280Leadership is a set of abilities, and like any other skill set it can be learned and improved. Becoming an exemplary leader isn’t easy. It takes self-belief, aspiration, grit, support and deliberate practice. Learning Leadership delivers the concrete framework and practical steps for building exemplary leaders for today’s and tomorrow’s challenges. Whether you’re an experienced leader or someone new to the role, this comprehensive guide offers evidenced-based strategies for taking charge of your own leadership development and unleashing the leader within. Based on more than 30 years of research, with data from more than 70 countries, this insightful treatment on learning explores the fundamentals of becoming an exemplary leader and presents a solid foundation on which to strengthen and expand leadership skills. For those in roles of mentoring and coaching people, the practical and proven framework in this resource enables you to develop leadership potential in the emerging leaders with whom you work. An exemplary leader must master many skills, but one of the most important is the ability to learn. Learning Leadership challenges you to do the meaningful and disciplined work necessary to becoming the best you can be.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• Authoritative explanations on what’s inhibiting leadership development.
• To take initiative for your own leadership development.
• The most critical leadership skill is the ability to learn.
• The first thing you need to learn in leadership is who you are.

12 Qualities Your Next Chief Data Officer Should Have (continued)

12 Qualities Your Next Chief Data Officer Should Have Infographic

by 

7. Be Technology Savvy and Understand the Latest Trends

A CDO deals with both the IT as the business aspects of Big Data and should, therefore, understand the concepts of data mining, artificial intelligence, machine learning, data modeling and data governance. Not only from the business perspective, but also from the IT perspective. In addition, the world of big data changes rapidly and new big data trends constantly emerge; he or she should, therefore, remain up-to-date with the latest trends.

8. Be Open to Input from Others

The CDO should not be the only one calling the shots. Of course, when a decision needs to be made on important, company-wide projects, the CDO should, together with the rest of the board, make the decision. However, a CDO should also empower his/her employees to make their own decisions within their projects. The Chief Data Officer should give control to his or her staff and should avoid micro-managing them.

9. Be Customer-Driven

When dealing with Big Data, organizations should take the customer into account in everything they do. This human-centered approach is vital. When projects are developed based on the actual needs of the customer, the chances of success are a lot higher. In addition, when developing big data projects, the CDO should ensure that the customer does not become the victim in terms of lost privacy and should ensure that the customer’s privacy is protected.

10. Be Security Driven

My vision is that all organizations will be hacked and if you are not being hacked, you are simply not important enough as an organization. Therefore, a CDO should have a strong security focus. As a CDO, the starting point should be that you will be hacked and if that’s the case, how do you prevent that hackers get access to any personal data or important company data or systems. A CDO should enforce the right security processes, implement the right encryption measures and use right IT Operations Analytics tools to detect attacks in real-time.

11. Be a Visionary Leader

A CDO needs to have a vision where he/she wants to bring the company to in the next 5-10 years. As mentioned Big Data projects take a lot of time to be completed and a strong and clear vision will help to complete the projects in the right way.

12. Be a Change Manager

Big data requires a culture change within the organization. Moving to a data-driven and information-centric culture is difficult as people have a natural inertia to change. Therefore, the Chief Data Officer should be a strong change manager, who is capable of changing people’s behavior within the company.

*This article was featured in our Leadership Newsletter series. To sign up for this free publication, click here.

Upcoming Webinar! True Stories from the Management Trenches

ihwx-aed34eff-119a-4bf3-af4d-f073535273d3-200-175Date: Thursday, January 5
Time: 1:00 PM ET
Speaker: Jathan Janove

Click here to register

From dealing with underperformers to fighting off lawsuits, employee problems are the bane of a manager’s existence. So what do most managers do? Ignore them! And that’s a recipe for more problems.

In this Soundview Live webinar, True Stories from the Management Trenches, HR expert and employment attorney Jathan Janove takes you inside the messy reality of situations gone wrong. These sometimes funny, always cautionary tales reinforce crucial lessons for managers. And each story suggests simple strategies to turn the situation around.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to develop Star Profiles for each position to increase engagement and determine whether or not an employee belongs.
  • The role management plays in exacerbating (or easing) trouble.
  • The memorable lessons that help managers motivate underachievers.
  • How to use discipline without inviting legal action.