FREE Webinar with Josh Bernoff – Thursday, 11/10!

Image result for writing without bullshitWriting Without Bullshit: Boost Your Career by Saying What You Mean

Date: Thursday, November 10
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Josh Bernoff

Register for FREE

The average news story now gets only 36 seconds of attention. Unless you change how you write, your emails, reports, and Web copy don’t stand a chance.

In this practical and witty Soundview Live webinar, Writing Without Bullshit: Boost Your Career by Saying What You Mean, you’ll learn to front-load your writing with pithy titles, subject lines, and opening sentences. You’ll acquire the courage and skill to purge weak and meaningless jargon, wimpy passive voice, and cowardly weasel words. And you’ll get used to writing directly to the reader to make every word count.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How clear writing can boost your career.
  • The top ten tips for writing that succeeds at work.
  • About the Iron Imperative, to treat the reader’s time as more valuable than your own.
  • How to plan and execute writing projects with confidence.

Seeing Beyond Ourselves

Image result for the outward mindset The Arbinger InstituteOur mindset is the lens through which we see our work, our relationships and our entire world. Unknowingly, too many of us operate from an inward mindset — a narrow-minded focus on self-centered goals and objectives. When faced with personal ineffectiveness or lagging organizational performance, most of us instinctively look for quick-fix behavioral band-aids, not recognizing the underlying mindset at the heart of our most persistent challenges. When individuals and organizations make the change to the outward mindset, incredible things start to happen. The outward mindset is focused on the objectives and results of the organization as a whole. It seeks to be helpful, responsible and make a real impact. It helps individuals see how they might be creating obstacles in the work of others, and helps them change the way they are working and relating to their team members in a way that creates real, sustainable results.

Through true stories and simple yet profound guidance and tools, The Outward Mindset enables individuals and organizations to make the one change that most dramatically improves performance, sparks collaboration and accelerates innovation — a shift to an outward mindset.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:

• How to recognize the two mindsets that drive people and organizations.
• How and why we prevent ourselves from having an outward mindset.
• The three key elements of an outward mindset and strategies for adopting them.
• Why adopting an outward mindset creates a competitive advantage for organizations

This newly released summary is included in all of our subscriptions. Click here for more info on how you can become a Soundview subscriber or check out the summary here.

Friday Book Review! Scrappy by Terri Sjodin

Image result for scrappy sjodin“Scrappiness” is a term that is easier to recognize in action than to define. To describe someone as scrappy is to describe a person who fights against the odds and manages to come out victorious against opponents or obstacles that are much “bigger” in some way than he or she might be. Terri Sjodin’s latest book, Scrappy, is filled with stories of such battles, as she explains to her readers exactly how and why being scrappy works.

For Sjodin, scrappiness is a combination of three elements: attitude, strategy and execution. The first required step to being scrappy is attitude: a mindset in which people recognize the bruises and pitfalls that might lie ahead, but decide to go for it anyway. For example, Sjodin tells the inspiring story of health club owner Susan Sly, who was struck by a diagnosis of multiple-sclerosis, a husband who leaves three days after the diagnosis and the loss of the health club due to unpaid taxes. Despite her illness, the single mother fought back and became one of the most successful sales producers for the Bally Fitness chain.

Successful scrappiness is about attitude, explains Sjodin, but it’s also about having the right strategy. In the second section of her book, Sjodin describes how to develop a strategy that is bold and somewhat risky without being reckless. Brian Palmer, president of National Speakers Bureau, was trying to land the business of an executive vice president at a large financial-services company who was unmoved by his approaches.

Finally, a mutual friend shared a conversation that she had with the EVP, who told her, half-seriously, “Brian Palmer doesn’t suck up enough!” Palmer decided to send a newly bought dustbuster to the prospect, explaining that he didn’t mind sucking up, but if he was not available, his dustbuster would take care of the sucking up. The move might have fallen flat but didn’t: The EVP loved the humor (and gumption), and Palmer started getting speaking gigs for his speakers.

According to Sjodin, scrappiness can range from big, bold moves to small gestures. To be scrappy is to have creative, often (but not always) humorous approaches to a problem, combined with a certain fearlessness. For example, rather than turning to online dating sites, 36-year-old serial entrepreneur Jennifer Matthey Riker decided to try a different tack: She took a part-time job (which she did not need) in the men’s department at a local Nordstrom’s. One day, she locked eyes with a man cutting through the store, and the two have now been married 13 years and have two children.

Once you “decide to go” and have developed a strategy to achieve what you want, the final step is to execute the plan, Sjodin writes. One of the important decisions is to determine when to launch. Timing can often make the difference between success and failure.

Another recommendation of Sjodin’s is to…(click here to continue reading)

Webinar 11/2: How to Think Like the Customer

How to Think Like the Customer

Date: Wednesday, November 2nd
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Stephen Wunker

Register here!

Successful innovation doesn’t begin with a brainstorming session—it starts with the customer. So in an age of unlimited data, why do more than 50% of new products fail to meet expectations? The truth is that we need to stop asking customers what they want . . . and start examining what they need.

In this Soundview Live webinar, How to Think Like the Customer, Stephen Wunker presents a simple concept that can remake how companies approach their markets and guide them through the innovation process.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to gather valuable customer insights
  • How to turn those insights into new product ideas
  • How to test and iterate until you find success

The Surprising Truth About the Power of Now

Check out this new summary!

Do you ever feel stressed? Of course you do. One way we cope is to lower expectations, but we miss what may make us stronger. Dr. Max McKeown offers valuable insights into an alternative.

You can choose to nurture a Nowist mindset, and by seeking joy in the flow of life, you will discover your natural power to take action and keep moving forward. We live in the present but carry the anxieties of the past and concerns of the future with us at all times. Yet, you can only directly think, do or change anything at the point of now. Realizing this, you can learn to transform your life with every moment. #NOW helps you to embrace the fullness of everyday life.

It encourages you to move beyond surviving, or coping, to joyfully and effortlessly live in harmony with the demands of your work-life balance. Instead of passively hiding or becoming overwhelmed, you can actively leap into the best that life has to offer. Discover the power of your #NOW that enables you to take action, make decisions fast and effectively, and enjoy the moment while creating a successful and happy future.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• Why impulsiveness can be highly functional and advantageous.
• Why Nowists love uncertainty and don’t regret missed opportunities.
• Understand the deep relationship among action, movement and joy in the Nowist mindset.
• Recognize and adopt goals that allow you to think and live as a Nowist.

Friday Book Review! Grit by Angela Duckworth

gritThe Power of Passion & Perseverance

Angela Duckworth, a professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, won a 2013 MacArthur Fellowship, an award so prestigious that it is also known as the “genius grant.” As Duckworth explains in the foreword to her latest book, Grit, the award of the grant reminded her that throughout her childhood, her scientist father would despair that she was no “genius” — in other words, that she just wasn’t smart enough or didn’t have a great-enough talent in anything.

And he was right. As Duckworth explains in her book, genius or talent didn’t win her the coveted MacArthur Fellowship: It was grit. According to Duckworth, grit is the combination of unbridled passion and unrelenting perseverance — a combination, she writes, that will overcome innate talent or hard work or high IQ or any of the other assumed key success factors for individuals. Duckworth first demonstrated the power of grit at West Point, where she sought to answer a question that had eluded a number of psychologists for decades: Why did so many new cadets drop out in the first training program of their West Point careers? Only a tiny portion of candidates make it through the admission gauntlet into West Point — and only if they receive a high-enough Whole Candidate Score, which carefully measures the likelihood that candidates have the mental and physical capabilities to make it at West Point. Thus, most should be in a position to survive the brutal seven-week training course known as “Beast Barracks.” Yet, many didn’t — and surprisingly their scores on the Whole Candidate Score bore no correlation to whether or not they dropped out.

In July 2004, Duckworth had new cadets take her Grit Scale, which was…(click here to continue reading)

Don’t miss our next webinar! 10/25 with Steve Cockram

soundview webinar speakerHow to Discover Your Leadership Voice

Date: Tuesday, October 25
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Steve Cockram

Click here to register!

In order to lead others effectively, we need a true understanding of ourselves, our natural tendencies and patterns of behavior. Are you focused on relationships, values, and people? Or are you oriented more toward tradition, money, and resources? Do you know how others hear your voice? Do you appreciate the contributions of others on your team?

In this Soundview Live webinar, How to Discover Your Leadership Voice, Steve Cockram will help you identify your natural leadership style, and give you a framework for leveraging your strengths.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to find your foundational leadership voice
  • How to hear and value the voices of others
  • How to know yourself before leading others
  • How to connect and communicate well with team, family and friends

Friday Book Review! The Network Imperative by Jerry Wind, Megan Beck, Barry Libert

The Network Imperative

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Not too many years ago, the idea of a hotel chain that didn’t own a single building or an international taxi service that didn’t own any cars might have seemed ludicrous. Today, of course, we know there are international companies worth billions of dollars in market value whose business model depends on customers connecting with independent suppliers of the service — not on the ownership of physical assets. In The Network Imperative, authors Barry Libert, Megan Beck and Jerry Wind describe the scalable, networking-based business model that is revolutionizing industries. Ebay, Uber, TripAdvisor and even Visa are examples of companies built on a network business model. One could argue that network firms are specific to certain industries. The authors disagree. “Be aware,” they write. “Investor capital, customer revenue and affinity, top talent and market buzz are shifting away from established firms toward network organizations.” According to their research, “digital networks are entering almost every industry, even some of the most mundane.”

High Performance

A quick comparison by the authors of market values between traditional and what they call “network firms” is revealing. For example, Hertz boasts a $7 billion market capitalization; Uber’s valuation is listed at more than $70 billion. Other business-performance measures also highlight the value of network firms. For example…(click here to read the full review)

FREE webinar with Ken Blanchard – Tuesday, 10/18!

Image result for ken blanchard

Speaker, Leadership/Business Guru, and Author of over 50 books, including The One Minute Manager

Learn How to Lead at a Higher Level
with Ken Blanchard

Effective leadership is needed at work, home, and in the community. Now is the time to discover the personal “leadership point of view” all great leaders possess- and apply it throughout your entire life.

Click here to register for FREE

In this FREE Soundview Live webinar, How to Lead at a Higher Level, Ken Blanchard brings together everything he’s learned about world-class leadership. This webinar extends Blanchard’s breakthrough work on delivering legendary customer service, creating “raving fans,” and building “Partnerships for Performance” that empower everyone who works for and with you.

You will learn:

  • How to create targets and visions based on the “triple bottom line”
  • Coaching techniques for creating higher-level leaders
  • How to create a higher-level culture throughout your organization

How to Develop the Ideal Team

Image result for teamwork

What Ideal Team Players Are Made of

Ideal team players possess adequate measures of humility, hunger and people smarts, according to Patrick Lencioni in The Ideal Team Player. They have little ego when it comes to needing attention or credit for their contributions, and they are comfortable sharing their accolades or even occasionally missing out on them. Ideal team players work with a sense of energy, passion and personal responsibility, taking on whatever they possibly can for the good of the team. Finally, they say and do the right things to help teammates feel appreciated, understood and included, even when difficult situations arise that require tough love. Most of us can recall having managed or worked with ideal team players in our careers, as they are quite appealing and memorable. How exactly should a leader go about evaluating people for humility, hunger and smarts? There is no easy, quantitative diagnostic, but there are reliable, qualitative approaches that can work very well. There are a number of questions managers can ask themselves about a given employee to determine whether he or she is humble, hungry or smart.

Humble. Does he genuinely compliment or praise teammates without hesitation? Does she easily admit when she makes a mistake? Is he willing to take on lower-level work for the good of the team? Does she gladly share credit for team accomplishments? Does he readily acknowledge his weaknesses? Does she offer and receive apologies graciously?

Hungry. Does he do more than what is required in his own job? Does she have passion for the “mission” of the team? Does he feel a sense of personal responsibility for the overall success of the team? Is she willing to contribute to and think about work outside of office hours? Is he willing and eager to take on tedious and challenging tasks whenever necessary? Does she look for opportunities to contribute outside of her area of responsibility?

Smart. Does he seem to know what teammates are feeling during meetings and interactions? Does she show empathy to others on the team? Does he demonstrate an interest in the lives of teammates? Is she an attentive listener? Is he aware of how his words and actions impact others on the team? Is she good at adjusting her behavior and style to fit the nature of a conversation or relationship? Teamwork is not a virtue but rather a choice. For those organizations that are sincere about humility, hunger and smarts, here are a few simple ideas for embedding those virtues into your culture.

• Be explicit and bold. Leaders who believe teamwork is important and expect their people to be humble, hungry and smart should come right out and say so. They should tell everyone. Employees. Vendors. Partners. Customers. It’s not marketing but rather expectation-setting.

• Catch and revere. Leaders should be constantly on the lookout for any displays of the virtues. And when they see those displays, they should hold them up as examples for everyone to see. Great team leaders will acknowledge an act of humility, hunger or people smarts not because they want to be seen as sophisticated or clever managers but because they want everyone to know exactly what kinds of behavior they expect and appreciate.

• Detect and address. Whenever you see a behavior that violates one of the values, take the time to let the violator know that his behavior is out of line. And don’t just do it in egregious situations. Often, the smaller offenses are the ones that are harder for employees to see and the ones they learn from the most. Of course, doing this well requires tact and good judgment. The key is that leaders and, eventually, teammates don’t squander opportunities for constructive learning.
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