Stop Fighting Human Nature and Increase Your Performance, Engagement and Influence

Selfish, Scared and Stupid examines the psychology behind why even the best ideas sometimes fail. Gregory and Flanagan help businesses design their organizations for reality rather than perfection and offer strategies to head off unprecedented levels of disengagement within and outside the business. They answer baffling questions around why the public sometimes fails to engage despite overwhelming data suggesting otherwise, why so many new products end up on clearance shelves, and why so many great salespeople often fall short of their monthly targets.

Selfish, Scared and Stupid is built on the idea that businesses must return to a more human engagement methodology in order to succeed. It is an informative read for anyone interested in improving influence, growing business reach, improving sales figures or understanding the complexities of human behavior.

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Master Personal Transformation, Seize Opportunity and Thrive in the Era of Endless Innovation

In Disrupt You!, Jay Samit, a digital-media expert who has launched, grown and sold startups and Fortune 500 companies alike, describes the unique method he has used to invent new markets and expand established businesses. He reveals how specific strategies that help companies flourish can be applied at an individual level to help anyone achieve success and lasting prosperity –– without needing to raise funds from outside investors. Incorporating stories and anecdotes from innovators and disruptive businesses, Samit shows…

 

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Our Declining Abilities as Humans

In the early years of cellphones, the younger generation’s affinity for texting might have been seen as another generation-gap marker. Almost surreptitiously, however, the cellphone has become much more than just the new way of doing things for a new generation. As eloquently documented in psychoanalyst Sharon Turkle’s new book, Reclaiming Conversation, the cellphone — and, more specifically, the smartphone — has dramatically shifted the core element at the heart of human society: human relationships. The havoc wreaked by the cellphone is not generation-specific because all generations are guilty.

Turkle encapsulates the problem as one of losing both the desire and even the ability of conversation. We avoid face-to-face conversations, or even phone conversations, in favor of texting or email.

Granted, texting or email can, in the right circumstances, be more efficient. And indeed, the efficiency argument is one that underpins much of the enthusiasm for the smartphone. As revealed through the many interviews Turkle conducted in her research for the book, the generation that grew up with cellphones is perplexed as to why anyone would prefer a live conversation that one cannot edit or control (you must respond immediately). This apparent efficiency, however, is insidious, because “Human relationships,” she writes, “are rich, messy and demanding. When we clean them up with technology, we move from conversation to the efficiencies of mere connection (author’s emphasis). I fear we forget the difference. And we forget that children who grow up in a world of digital devices don’t know that there’s a difference.”

Pilots in a Cockpit

In her disturbing book, Turkle details the negative impact of moving from conversation to “mere connection.” It ranges from the end of imaginative and creative daydreaming — with a phone always handy, any spare second is filled with trolling through apps or checking Facebook — to the inability of being empathetic to others — which requires eye contact, listening and attending to someone — to even the inability of being true to one’s self. Today, unfettered journal entries have been replaced by carefully constructed positive posts on Facebook.

The damage of the age of the cellphone impacts everything we do. In the workplace, for example, employees turn on their screens and put on large earphones to block out the rest of the world — resembling pilots in a cockpit, according to one manager. It is not that the employees want privacy or solitude. In fact, the fear of solitude is one of the major changes wrought by the smartphone; people are never alone and never want to be alone. As a result, even the simple assignment of working on a project is unfathomable to younger employees; they need to work in groups.

Turkle is not anti-technology. She does not pine for a past that has disappeared. Instead, she compellingly describes how we are becoming unnecessarily diminished in our abilities as humans. The answer is not to reject technology but to use it properly. “We can become different kinds of consumers of technology, just as we have become different kinds of consumers of food,” she writes. Reclaiming Conversation is an important book, one that hopefully will be read and talked about — or at least posted about extensively on social media so that its vital message can break into the millions of cockpits that now make up our society.

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Get a sneak peek at February’s reviews

Take a look at the selections Soundview has chosen for February’s reviews.


RECLAIMING CONVERSATION

The Power of Talk in a Digital Age
by Sherry Turkle

In her disturbing book, Turkle details the negative impact of moving from conversation to “mere connec-tion.” It ranges from the end of imaginative and creative daydreaming — with a phone always handy, any spare second is filled with trolling through apps or checking Facebook — to the inability of being empathetic to others — which requires eye contact, listening and attending to someone — to even the inability of being true to one’s self.

 

GOOD PROFIT

How Creating Value for Others Built One of the World’s Most Successful Companies
by Charles G. Koch

In his new book, Good Profit, Koch introduces a management frame-work called Market-Based Management, or MBM, which consists of five elements: Vision, Virtue and Talents, Knowledge Processes, Decision Rights, and Incentives.

 

 

 

MILLENNIALS WHO MANAGE

How to Overcome Workplace Perceptions and Become a Great Leader
by Chip Espinoza and Joel Schwarzbart

While past studies and books might focus on Millennials in their role as future leaders, a new book declares that the future has arrived. Millennials Who Manage: How to Overcome Workplace Perceptions and Become a Great Leader, by Chip Espinoza and Joel Schwarzbart, is written for and not about Millennial leaders and managers.

 

 

 
SERIAL WINNER
5 Actions to Create Your Cycle of Success
by Larry Weidel

In his book, Serial Winner, Weidel argues that anyone can be a winner — and not just a winner but a serial winner, the type of person who wins over and over.

 

 

 

 

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How to Prevent Bullying in the Workplace

IF YOU GO: 
Bullying in the Workplace
Date: Wednesday, January 20th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Andrew Faas

Bullying in the workplace destroys careers, lives, family units, organizations, and communities. Many organizational cultures condone and even encourage bullying. Most people who are targeted and or are bystanders do not report for fear of retaliation. Amazingly, many who are targeted are unaware that what they are going through is bullying.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Bullying in the Workplace, author Andrew Faas provides comprehensive and provocative insight into the dynamics, impacts, and costs of bullying in the workplace and answers how it can be prevented and stopped. Faas asserts that everyone has a role to play and challenges the reader to take action.

You Will Learn:

  • What culture has to do with bullying.
  • About the dynamics of bullying.
  • How to effectively deal with bullying.
  • Important advice for the bullied and the bully.

Register today for this informative webinar!

 

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How Great Companies Ignite Passion in Their People Without Burning Them Out

What key question do managers and supervisors at Marriott Hotels ask their employees each day, enabling them to maintain a turnover rate that is one-third of the industry standard? Why are there more than 500 “co-presidents” at a software firm that has twice been recognized as the best place to work in Minneapolis? Why does a burgeoning healthcare consultancy firm in Philadelphia ban its people from sending business-related emails after 6 p.m. and on weekends?

The answer to these intriguing questions –– along with many others –– can be found in Eric Chester’s On Fire at Work. Chester reveals the seven cultural pillars that today’s leading employers focus on to attract and retain top talent: compensation, alignment, atmosphere, growth, acknowledgment, communication and autonomy. On Fire at Work is a practical field guide that leaders in any organization can implement to build more than an engaged workforce, but rather a workforce that’s on fire!

In this summary, you will learn:

• The seven cultural pillars used to attract and retain top talent.
• What sparks on-fire commitment to a job.
• Five ways to ensure core value alignment.
• The Four Ps of Recognition and Reward.

Look for the full-length summary in your Soundview library. Not a Soundview subscriber? Click here to sign up!

 

Get a sneak peak at this month’s reviews

Take a look at the selections Soundview has chosen for January’s reviews.

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RED TEAM41VrCUyHOFL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_

How to Succeed by Thinking Like the Enemy
by Micah Zenko

Trusting in the New Devil’s Advocate

In Red Team: How to Succeed by Thinking Like the Enemy, a gripping, deeply informed overview of red teaming, author and security expert Micah Zenko describes how red teams are used by corporations and countries to prevent untested assumptions and blind spots from undermining efforts to identify potential threats.

 

 

41mP1gHdQCL._SX333_BO1,204,203,200_MISPLACED TALENT
A Guide to Better People Decisions
by Joe Ungemah

Getting the Right People in the Right Seats

In his mega-seller Good to Great, Jim Collins famously talked about getting the right people in the right seats on the bus. In Misplaced Talent, human-resources consultant Joe Ungemah offers HR practitioners a thorough overview of the tools, techniques and frameworks required to achieve this important goal.

 

 

 

51q71sE7c5L._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_SUPERFORECASTING
The Art and Science of Prediction
by Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner

Rethinking Expert Predictions

Superforecasting, co-authored with journalist Dan Gardner, is based on empirical evidence drawn from what Tetlock calls phase 2 of the GJP. This phase was actually part of a larger experiment sponsored by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, or IARPA, a government agency tasked with sponsoring research that improves the effectiveness of American intelligence.

 

 

41jPAmR5dFL._SX346_BO1,204,203,200_FRIEND & FOE
When to Cooperate, When to Compete, and How to Succeed at Both
by Adam Galinsky and Maurice Schweitzer

Balancing Competition and Cooperation

Galinsky and Schweitzer build on research from across the social sciences as well as advances in neuroscience to explain how the most successful people and successful relationships are those in which we find the right balance of both competition and cooperation.

 

 

Full-length reviews are posted here throughout each month. Check back often for these and other upcoming selections.

 

No women? Leaky Pipeline? Here’s how to fix it.

Today’s guest blogger is Jodi Detjen, Managing Partner at Orange Grove Consulting, Professor of the Practice in Management at Suffolk University in Boston, MA and co-author of The Orange Line:

Microsoft announced on November 23 that the percentage of women decreased by almost 2.5% since last year.  The reason? Changes in their workplace meant that women – who predominated on the production line – were laid off.  The real reason?  Too many women at the bottom and too few at the top:  The leaky pipeline.

Too often excuses about the leaky pipeline are rationalized as women’s choices or insufficient talent availability.  In fact, there are two key reasons why the pipeline continues to drip.

Reason #1 is entrenched organizational bias that limits decision makers’ ability to see alternatives.  Decision makers fall into the trap of promoting people that look and act just like me rather than identifying candidates outside the traditional path.  Managers make decisions for women rather than asking them (e.g. she won’t want to do that international trip; she has young kids at home). Women hear comments like: she shouldn’t present; it’s an audience of all men and they will want to hear a man speak. It also limits the way work is defined such that work becomes focused on how many hours we can extract from employees rather than cultivating ideas and innovation.

Reason #2 is more hidden and less identified.  These are the hidden assumptions women make about themselves that limit their career ambitions.  These too show up as rationalizations: I can’t go on that international trip; who will take care of the kids? I can’t ask my husband. Or as limited opportunities:  I don’t want that promotion.  I’ve never done that before.  I’m not qualified.  I’ll try in a few years.  After a while, these hidden assumptions start to become fact and become unconscious.

The problem with unconscious bias is that we don’t see it.  The problem with raising consciousness is we don’t know what to do about it.  The way to manage both reasons is to face the bias head on and then shift our mindset about it.  That is, we notice the bias, we look at the impact, then we reframe how we think about it.  Instead of she shouldn’t present, we ask, who’s the most competent and compelling speaker for this audience?  Instead of I don’t want that promotion we think, that promotion will help me grow.  I will learn and be able to contribute more. I will figure out the details as I go.

Changing our mindset changes everything.  We move from a limited, contracted world-view to one with significantly more options.  We have choices.  We can experiment.  And the end result?  The pipeline stops leaking.  Working with only one reason won’t work.  The bias is in both places.  The solution isn’t easy but it also isn’t impossible.  We simply reframe.

detjen
Jodi Detjen
Jodi@orangegroveconsulting.com
@jodidetjen

For more information on overcoming biases in the workplace, join Jodi Detjen for our upcoming Soundview Live webinar, Overcoming the Biases that Can Limit Women’s Careers on Tuesday, December 8th.

 

The Best Business Books of 2015 (Part II)

As promised, here are the other 15 titles that made our Best Business Book of 2015 list, including our December titles that were just released over the weekend.

The New IT by Jill Dyche – Jill Dyché provides a new business model for building and strengthening the role of IT. By using field-tested techniques to align your IT department with your corporate objectives, you can leverage the power of technology across the entire company.

Design to Grow by Linda Tischler & David Butler – David Butler and Linda Tischler share the successes and failures of Coca-Cola as this large, global company learned to use design to create both scale and agility.

Make It Matter by Scott Mautz – Scott Mautz reveals that fostering meaning at work by giving workers a greater sense of significance is the key to motivation and engagement.

The High-Speed Company by Jason Jennings & Laurence Haughton – Jennings and Haughton share strategies and practices demonstrated by businesses with proven records of creating cultures with strong purpose, trust and follow-through.

The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz – Ben Horowitz tells it straight as he shares insights gained from developing, managing, selling, buying investing in and supervising technology companies.

Learning to Succeed by Jason Wingard – Corporate learning expert Jason Wingard proposes that to keep ahead of the competition, organizations should shift to embracing learning across the ranks and become dynamic learning organizations.

The Lean CEO by Jacob Stoller – Many companies and CEOs are finding that to do more with less, that they can find solutions in Lean management techniques to deliver sustainable financial results, empower and motivate employees, break down internal silos and build solid partnerships with customers and suppliers.

The Good Ones by Bruce Weinstein – Ethics expert Bruce Weinstein presents 10 crucial qualities associated with high-character employees that can enhance employee satisfaction, client relationships and the bottom line.

The Attacker’s Advantage by Ram Charan – Ram Charan provides proven tools to help leaders embrace uncertainty and develop the skills to be better prepared to lead.

Persuasion Equation by Mark Rodgers – This insightful guide by Mark Rodgers reveals what drives decisions and introduces the persuasion equation –– a powerful combination of factors proven to speed agreement.

Team Genius by Rich Karlgaard & Michael Malone – Rich Karlgaard and Michael S. Malone focus on the critical role of Informal teams within the core of successful companies.

The Achievement Habit by Bernard Roth – Bernie Roth, co-founder of the Stanford d.school, offers a guide for harnessing the power of design thinking to help meet life’s challenges and fulfill goals.

The Four Lenses of Innovation by Rowan Gibson – Rowan Gibson presents an innovation methodology for systematically stretching your thinking, discovering inspiring new insights and producing a portfolio of high-quality ideas and radically new growth opportunities.

Stronger by George Everly, Douglas Strouse & Dennis McCormack – Personal resilience is the ability to bounce back in the wake of adversity. The authors share a set of five core factors that protect successful people against psychological distress and emotional injury.

Peers Inc by Robin Chase – A co-founder of Zipcar, Robin Chase, introduces the collaborative economy in which companies and governments are using the Internet’s ability to facilitate collaboration by leveraging expertise, assets and resources outside their sphere of control.

What 2015 books have you found to be most helpful in your business and career over the past year? Post your choices to the blog.

 

The Best Business Books of 2015 (Part I)

As we approach the end of the year, it’s time to announce our choices for the best business books of 2015. Our editorial board is continually watching the business books that are being prepared for publication, to choose those that we think provide new information, while giving principles and practices that can be put to immediate use by our subscribers.

Here are the first 15 of our 30 Best Business Book List:

Rookie Smarts by Liz Wiseman – Leadership expert Liz Wiseman explains how to reclaim and cultivate the curious, flexible, youthful mindset of a rookie.

The Reciprocity Advantage by Bob Johansen & Karl Ronn – Leading forecaster Bob Johansen and business developer Karl Ronn share a model for creating new growth for your business using the underutilized resources.

Overworked and Overwhelmed by Scott Eblin – Leading forecaster Bob Johansen and business developer Karl Ronn share a model for creating new growth for your business using the underutilized resources.

Good Leaders Ask Great Questions by John C. Maxwell – To be a successful leader, you need to be asking yourself and your team key questions in order to learn, grow, and develop better ideas.

Becoming Your Best by Steven Shallenberger – Shallenberger reveals the 12 principles you need to follow in order to reach your highest potential and drive the kind of innovation that turns good companies into industry leaders.

Bringing Strategy Back by Jeffrey Sampler – Strategy expert Jeffrey Sampler introduces four “strategic shock absorbers” that enable leaders to build resilient organizations that can withstand even the most unexpected global turbulence.

Low-Hanging Fruit by Jeremy Eden & Terri Long – Jeremy Eden and Terri Long have distilled 77 of their most effective techniques for generating real performance improvements drawn from their success working with major companies.

Stacking the Deck by David Pottruck – David Pottruck presents the nine-steps that leaders who are facing major change in their organizations can follow from the first realization that change is needed through implementation.

Anticipate by Rob-Jan de Jong – Strategy and leadership expert Rob-Jan de Jong explains how to develop the ability to see things early and incorporate them into the future of your organization.

The 5 Choices by Kory Kogon, Adam Merrill & Leena Rinne – The authors combine research and insights from FranklinCovey to redefine time management in ways that will increase the productivity of individuals, teams and organizations.

Thirteeners by Daniel Prosser – CEO mentor Dan Prosser shares how to transform an organization’s internal connectedness so it can achieve the next level of performance.

The Hidden Leader by Scott Edinger & Laurie Sain – Scott Edinger and Laurie Sain show how managers can recognize and develop these talented employees in order to deliver even greater value to customers.

The Power of Thanks by Derek Irvine & Eric Mosley – Globoforce executives Eric Mosley and Derek Irvine explain how a Culture of Recognition can boost employee engagement and loyalty, stronger teamwork and a more innovative culture.

Leadership Blindspots by Robert Bruce Shaw – Robert Bruce Shaw helps leaders to identify weaknesses, threats and other vulnerabilities that can impair effectiveness, results and even their careers.

Triggers by Marshall Goldsmith – Goldsmith details six engaging questions that can help us enact meaningful and lasting change in order to become the person we want to be.

Watch for next Monday’s blog to see the rest of the list.