Book Review: Accountability

accountability

by Greg Bustin

Being accountable and responsible for decisions and actions is challenging for business leaders. If you can learn to be more accountable, however, it can lead to success for you and your organization. In Accountability, business and leadership consultant Greg Bustin, offers insightful concepts and practical examples from companies that will increase accountability and drive success for any type of organization. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

As Bustin writes, “Your sweet spot is where your personal core values (what you’re willing to do) intersect with your experience (what you can do) and your interests (what you want to do). Finding your sweet spot is one of the most gratifying accomplishments you can experience. It’s also a key to driving accountability.” Bustin urges leaders to be reflective about what is significant in their lives and make those thoughts into a set of goals to obtain. Learning more about your sweet spot requires becoming accountable for your work while helping all your employees transition from Point A to Point B with ease.

Accountability demonstrates how to use the Seven Pillars of Accountability to create your bridge to the future and help you reach your potential. Bustin introduces the Seven Pillars of Accountability: character, unity, learning, tracking, urgency, reputation and evolution. The first pillar is character, which helps leaders define their organization’s character and values so that they can communicate them. The other six characteristics complete the acronym C.U.L.T.U.R.E. This acronym will help remind leaders that culture is significant to performance. Accountability offers leaders practical steps to grow and sustain a high-performance culture within their business.

Business with a Purpose

Here at Soundview, we’re always looking for the latest trends in business. These trends are highlighted by the hot topics of the business books that are being published. Recently, there seems to be many books coming across our desk on Purpose.

One such title is The Purpose Economy by Aaron Hurst, which we are summarizing this month and hosting a webinar with in September. Like the Information Economy, which has driven innovation and economic growth until now, Hurst argues that our new economic era is driven by connecting people to their purpose. It’s an economy where value lies in establishing purpose for employees and customers through serving needs greater than their own, enabling personal growth and building community.

Part of the Do Books series, Do/Purpose is written by David Hieatt. In Do/Purpose, Hieatt offers insights on how to build one of these purpose-driven companies. You know, those rare brands we all fall in love with. The crazy ones that don’t just make something, but change something as well.

Another purpose-focused book is Black Hole Focus by Isaiah Hankel. As Hankel puts it, “Don’t get stuck on a career path you have no passion for. Don’t waste your intelligence on something that doesn’t really mean anything more to you than a paycheck. Let (me) help you define a focus so powerful that everything in your life will be pulled towards it. Create your purpose and change your life. Be focused. Be fulfilled. Be successful.”

When we talk about corporate culture, there is also A Culture of Purpose by Christoph Lueneburger. Building a culture of purpose is one of the greatest challenges facing modern leaders, as today’s best minds are looking for meaning, not just jobs. More than any other single factor, cultures of purpose power winning organizations, attracting the smartest, most creative, most passionate talent.

There are more, but I’ll stop with these four. Why the interest in purpose? I think there are several factors that have brought this theme to the forefront.

One key factor is generational. The younger generations in the marketplace are looking for more than the Traditional and Baby Boomer generations when it comes to purpose. It’s no longer about making money to retire and enjoy life. It’s now about enjoying life along the way, and believing that what you do matters.

Another factor is the ever faster pace of life. As work spills over more and more into life, people want to know that what they’re doing has a purpose that is worth the sacrifice.

And perhaps a third factor might be a greater interest on the part of younger generations in the environment around them. They want to know that the company they work for is focused on the health and safety of people, and on the preservation of the environment. Again, this is purpose-driven living.

Perhaps you see additional factors at work that are causing this focus on purpose. We’d love to hear what you think. Post your own thoughts in the comments section of this blog for others to consider.

Strategically Lead with Three New Summaries

Effective leadership is all about strategy. Leaders need thought-out strategies to connect with their employees and customers to develop a unique culture within your organization. Soundview has three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries that help you approach your management or leadership role with valuable strategies.

accountability

by Greg Bustin

Accountability by Greg Bustin Greg Bustin, business and leadership consultant, offers insightful concepts and practical examples from real-life experiences that will increase accountability and drive success for any type of organization in Accountability. He introduces the Seven Pillars of Accountability: character, unity, learning, tracking, urgency, reputation and evolution, and how to sustain a high-performance culture for a thriving business.

 

 

the_purpose_economy

by Aaron Hurst

The Purpose Economy by Aaron Hurst The Purpose Economy describes the shifts in American economy and set of ways in which people and organizations are focused on creating value. Globally recognized entrepreneur Aaron Hurst examines three types of purpose that are transforming the economy: personal, social, and societal. Based on his own personal experiences and interviews with other entrepreneurs, The Purpose Economy is a guide on how to transform your company and career to better serve the world.

 

elevate

by Rich Horwath

Elevate by Rich Horwath Elevate offers leaders and executives with an outline for developing advanced strategic thinking approach. Strategy expert Rich Horwath focuses on advanced strategic thinking that will drive results in the short-and long-term. His three-discipline approach breaks strategy down into its fundamentals: Coalesce, Compete and Champion and how to apply it to your day-to-day tasks.

Book Review: Judgment on the Front Line

Judgment_on_the_front_line

by Chris DeRose and Noel Tichy

Ever wonder why in some organizations the key to success are the frontline leaders? It’s because those companies value their employees’ creativity and experience. Frontline employees can be a huge asset because they have insight into what customers want. In Judgment on the Front Line, management experts Chris DeRose and Noel Tichy explain why frontline employees are so important to organizations and why it is crucial to involve them in decision making. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

Many companies don’t know how to give frontline associates a useful tool kit for problem solving. DeRose and Tichy explain that most organizations don’t know how to evaluate the risk of giving employees more responsibility to exercise their own judgment. Leaders will learn that it is not a risk but an opportunity to value frontline employees’ opinions. In Judgment on the Front Line, you will learn how to implement frontline leadership in your company and how to involve frontline employees in decision making.

The authors write about a five-step process for building a frontline-focused organization. These steps can help leaders to build or rebuild their companies from the front line to use the knowledge of these employees. The first step is to connect the front line to the customer. “The CEO and senior team have three fundamental responsibilities in step 1: Understand changing customer needs based on feedback from customers and employees. Ensure that the organization’s capabilities match the customer promise. And connect the front line to delivery and improvement of the customer value proposition.” Judgment on the Front Line goes on to list the other steps in this process. The other four steps are teach people to think for themselves, experiment to implement, break down the hierarchy, and invest in frontline capability. Throughout the book, the authors provide many examples of how some companies are using frontline leadership successfully and how investing in your frontline can be beneficial and deliver greater results for your organization.

Book Review: Brief

brief_Joseph_McCormack

by Joseph McCormack

We get swamped with emails and text messages daily. In a world where everyone is busy and constantly receiving information, you need to be a lean communicator. In Brief, senior marketing executive Joseph McCormack helps you develop into a master of brevity with the greatest impact. McCormack advises readers to use his step-by-step approach to becoming a brief communicator by quickly delivering your message in fewer words. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

McCormack writes how to overcome overcapacity. When you’re constantly bombarded with information, your attention span becomes short. In Brief, McCormack gives statistics on the declining attention span in the United States. The average attention span has shrunk from 12 seconds in 2000 to eight in 2012. By being brief, you’re not only working more efficiently but your message will be more effective.

He also states that achieving brevity can be difficult because of the “seven capital sins” that can hinder you. “There is no single reason why people find it hard to be brief. Love of talking seems to be the logical front-runner, but in reality, it is among a short list of seven key contributors that can be deadly if left unchecked.” Brief continues to list the seven capital sins that can be detrimental to your brevity. The seven capital sins are cowardice, confidence, callousness, comfort, confusion, complication, and carelessness. Within these “sins” there’s room for you to understand why you’re not communicating as effectively as you should so you can transform into a master of brevity. Other topics you will learn by reading this book is how to make your message more concise and how to apply BRIEF principles to every message. By doing so, you will achieve greater results in various areas of your professional life.