How to Become an Expert Negotiator

You may be a high-ranking CEO or a first day salesman, a service provider or self-employed. If you face encounters with your partners, clients, suppliers or employees, in which you want them to think differently at the end of the meeting and actually do what you want – our next Soundview Live webinar is for YOU. The objective of this webinar, How to Become an Expert Negotiator with Daniel Weiser, is to improve your negotiation skills and to move you one step closer to closing your deal.

Here are 27 Negotiation Tips from Weiser’s book Become An Expert Negotiator:
#1: Ask about the other’s reference point at the beginning of the interaction.
#2: Find out if you’re both in the same “ballpark.”
#3: The status quo effect is the “mother” of many objections.
#4: Lower the perceived risk.
#5: State your purpose in order to lower the firewall.
#6: Don’t talk about a certain topic – before you know the other party is interested to listen about it.
#7: Don’t wait for an anticipated rejection – vaccinate against it.
#8: Adjust your communication style to that of your counterpart.
#9: Address what the term “partnership” means to your business partner.
#10: Pierce the firewall through Aikido.
#11: Don’t tell the other side what he will gain – ask him to speak about it.
#12: Establish that the deal is “fair” according to external objective criteria.
#13: Reframe the interpretation of the situation.
#14: Elicit statements that can later be used to support your position.
#15: Indicate others who made the same decision as the one requested in this negotiation.
#16: Use the rule of comparison often.
#17: It’s not about being nice – it’s about being similar.
#18: Be the first to give something.
#19: When you concede on an issue – request something in return.
#20: The foot in the door.
#21: Limit the time to respond to an offer.
#22: Present the upside potential, but also the downside of rejection.
#23: Feel successful and radiate it.
#24: Be specific about your references and success indicators.
#25: Talk about the fears of relevant others.
#26: Fulfill your negotiation partner’s needs and keep quiet about achieving yours.
#27: Sometimes, simply ask for help.

If you would like to hear more about these tips, join us on January 29th and bring your whole sales team. As we know, every little improvement in our negotiation skills could be the difference between getting the sale or not.

Making Your Attitude Your Greatest Asset

Not All You’ve Heard
The axiom “attitude is everything” has been stated by so many motivational speakers and writers over the years that many of us simply accept it as fact. If so many people believe it, it must be true, right?

Wrong, says leadership expert John Maxwell in The Difference Maker. He maintains that while attitude is important, there are certain things it cannot achieve. It cannot change people into something they’re not. Attitude cannot replace competence, experience or personal growth and it cannot change the facts. Maxwell gives an example of two people applying for the same job. One has skills, talent and 10 years experience, but a so-so attitude. The other has a super attitude, but no experience. Who gets the job? “Probably the one with the greater skills and experience,” writes Maxwell. “Why? Because a great attitude will not make up the gap.”

Attitude as an Asset
Despite the “cannots,” Maxwell writes, attitude is a primary component in determining our success. While it can’t alter what exists, it can influence our future via how we choose to deal with things we encounter in everyday life. “The happiest people,” he notes, “don’t necessarily have the best of everything; they make the best of everything.” Essentially, if we expect bad things, he says, we get them. Conversely, we often get good things by expecting them.

By applying attitude correctly, we can make it one of our most powerful assets. To this end, Maxwell stresses, it’s something we control; it’s a matter of choice, not circumstances, how we deal with a particular situation. To do so, we need to first evaluate our current attitude, create the desire to change it, then rearrange our thoughts to do so.

This is largely done by making an effort to allow our thinking to run in positive channels. Maxwell believes negative thoughts lead to negative beliefs, which in turn lead to wrong decisions and actions, creating a pattern of bad habits. Developing the proper attitude can reverse this vicious cycle. He also maintains that attitude adjustment isn’t a one-time event; it’s something we have to manage daily.

Point by Point
To change our attitude, Maxwell claims, we have to overcome what he calls the “Big Five” major attitude obstacles. “When you can learn to deal with them in a positive way,” he says, “you can face anything else life may have in store for you.”

According to Maxwell, the first hurdle is discouragement. If not handled correctly, discouragement can make someone give up instead of facing the situation. This involves not becoming fixated or paralyzed, but viewing things from different perspectives and taking the best road possible for your personal well-being. The mix includes introspection, having the right expectations and making the right decisions.

The second hurdle is change, something that most people resist. The key here, Maxwell allows, is to objectively examine why we’re opposed to the change. Once that’s established, we need to determine how to make the change successful and positive, keeping in mind that all change has a price to which we must be willing to commit.

Problems are the third obstacle. “Our perspective on problems, not the problem itself, usually determines our success or failure,” writes Maxwell. To this end, the difference between problem-spotting and problem-solving can be crucial. Tackling a problem head-on and working out the best way of dealing with it can often turn into an opportunity for personal or professional advancement.

The fourth obstacle is fear. Here, Maxwell invokes Franklin D. Roosevelt’s words, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” as far more than rhetoric. Maxwell contends that if permitted to run rampant, fear can generate inaction, weakness and more fear, which can be destructive. Rather than waste energy by being afraid, we need to realize the limitations fear places on us. It’s only by properly handling what we’re afraid of, he says, that we can overcome fear and achieve our full potential.

Last, Maxwell discusses failure. The premise is simple: If we fail or make a mistake, we need to learn from it and go on. Otherwise, we run the risk of letting it defeat us. By seeing failure as a teacher rather than a limit, we remain capable of taking risks – something necessary for success.

Why We Like This Book
While some might argue that what Maxwell offers is simply common sense, the book goes far beyond. Written in a light, almost chatty style that uses examples, anecdotes and quotes from Abraham Lincoln to Yogi Berra, it provides many points of entry and shows how anyone, if determined, can indeed make his or her attitude make a difference. Copyright (c) 2007 Soundview Executive Book Summaries

Are You Overwhelmed?

New research shows that the smartphone equipped professional is connected to work 72 hours a week. Forty eight percent of Americans report that their stress level is up and that the number one source of stress is the job pressure of a 24/7 world.

In the midst of this tremendous pressure, some people are turning to a practice called mindfulness. Mindfulness is “the intentional, accepting and non-judgmental focus of one’s attention on the emotions, thoughts and sensations occurring in the present moment”, which can be trained by meditational practices derived from Buddhist anapanasati” – Wikipedia.

In the book Overworked and Overwhelmed, Scott Eblin applies this concept of mindfulness to the business world. In his own words, Eblin promises to “make the practice of mindfulness easy, accessible, and relevant for people who feel like they’re trapped on the gerbil wheel. The goal is not to turn you into a Buddhist monk or nun but to offer the knowledge that, along with simple, practical, and applicable routines, will help you align your work and the rest of your life with the results that matter most.”

If you would like to learn more about mindfulness for business, join us on January 15th for our Soundview Live webinar Mindfulness Basics to Thrive in a 24/7 World. From Eblin you will learn:

• “Must know” mindfulness basics that today’s professional needs to thrive in a 24/7 world.
• Inspiring examples of mindfulness in action from dozens of leaders ranging from a U.S. Coast Guard Commandant to the CEO of Hilton Worldwide.
• A self-assessment for readers to understand how they perform at their best.
• Simple routines to reduce stress and sustain peak performance.
• A personal planning framework for creating the outcomes that matter most at home, at work and in the community.

De-stress your life and start the New Year right with this one-hour webinar. And invite your colleagues to join you over lunch.

Book Review: Overworked and Overwhelmed

overworkedandoverwhelmed

by Scott Eblin

Do you ever feel swamped at work? You have emails to reply to, deals to close, problems to resolve, and deadlines to make. The task are piling up on your desk and you feel overwhelmed. You are not alone. Top leadership coach, Scott Eblin, provides simple routines to reduce stress and sustain peak performance in Overworked and Overwhelmed. Eblin makes his practice of mindfulness simple to offer actionable hope for anyone whose stress level is up. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

“Through awareness and intention, the mindfulness alternative sets you up for high performance. It helps you identify the difference between extrinsic interference that you can’t control and the intrinsic interference of thoughts that can keep you from performing at your full potential,” writes Eblin. He defines what mindfulness means as “managing the gap between your thoughts and actions,” and then how to practice it by understanding the internal and external factors of your stress. He also offers different physical, mental and spiritual routines to practice mindfulness in your life. Eblin presents seven principles for choosing and following the routines that work best for you. “Strive for rhythm, not balance” is the first principle, which helps you develop a rhythm for all your responsibilities at work, home, and community.

Overworked and Overwhelmed is for anyone who feels frustrated or struggling to express their full potential and live their highest purpose. This book will help you discover your true purpose and define what success means to you specifically.

Don‘t Leave Home Without Them

In Frances Cole Jones’ book How to Wow, she include a set of techniques that every business person should know and use every day.

1. Three elements of Face-to-Face Communication – 7% words, 38% tone of voice and 55% body language.
2. The Power of Story Telling – speak from your own experience while acknowledging your listener’s situation.
3. My Name is Bond – say your name with such panache that the listener will remember it.
4. Avoid Useless Modifiers – use descriptive words instead of empty modifiers.
5. The All-Important Diaphragm – speak from your diaphragm to give your voice more authority.
6. Persuasive Words – the number one word is “You.” Focus your communication on the listener. Also: Money, Save, New, Results, Health, Easy, Safety, Love, Discover, Proven and Guarantee.
7. What to Wear – from your clothes, to your shoes, to your watch, it’s all important to consider.
8. Nerves – the nerves in your neck affect your nervousness. Bend over and let your head hang free, and your nervousness will dissipate.
9. Listen Up – it’s not hearing, or waiting to talk, or zoning out because you think you already know what they’re going to say. Instead, listen to find out.
10. More Isn’t Better, Better Is Better – concise is often the best.
11. Because, because… – you need to fill in your listening on the “because”, not just give them the solutions.
12. Entrances and Exits – be aware of the entrance into a situation and the exit from it, the technology guy with your microphone, and bus person with the glass of water. It all matters.
13. Two is One, and One is None – have extra of the things you need to communicate, to avoid Murphy’s Law.

This is just the tip of the iceberg of the hands-on tips and techniques that Jones has collected over her years of communicating with others. We will be tapping into her vast knowledge of personal communication through our upcoming Soundview Live webinar Proven Strategies for Selling Yourself in Any Situation on January 6th. Register today and mark your calendar. It will be well worth an hour of your time.