Guest Blog: How to Create a Solid Team by Daniel Milstein

Image result for teamThere is generally no such thing as a successful “lone wolf.” Talent might win the game, but it takes teamwork to capture the championship. Nearly everything I have accomplished so far has been the result of a group effort. From my work at McDonald’s as a teenager, to becoming the founder and CEO of the Gold Star Family of Companies, I was always aware that my success wouldn’t have been possible without the other team members’ support. If you want to succeed, you must depend on the cooperation of co-workers, business colleagues, family members and friends. Here’s how:

Build your team. You may not have a formal team to support you. However, you still have a group of people with whom you work—even though you may all have equal standing. Consider colleagues and associates as team members who can help you reach your job-related goals. Include them in your planning process when appropriate, and listen to their suggestions. You can also help them reach their goals. If you are self-employed and work alone, you still have family and friends who can provide a strong network of support for your business. Bounce ideas off of them, ask them to help spread the word about your work, and collaborate with others when necessary. Even an artist or writer doesn’t work alone. They need readers, printers, art collectors and reviewers to truly be successful. Build your team well. Fill it with those willing to support you. You cannot expect to lead a positive life if you surround yourself with negative people.

Be willing to collaborate.  Don’t aspire to be the best on the team. Aspire to be the best for the team. Many people feel competitive when working with others, and try to get their ideas heard above the rest. I’ve been in meetings where ego gets in the way of production. People get so caught up in figuring out who gets the credit that nothing gets accomplished. Sometimes things even go into litigation over ego issues. If you are simply trying to be the best on the team, you don’t leave much room for other people to grow and to lead. Don’t be a spotlight-stealer. What you build together will be stronger than what you build alone.

Create more leaders. True leaders don’t create followers; they create more leaders. That’s why we at Gold Star look for new employees who have the potential to become leaders; they can continue helping us grow while they develop their careers. The great ones want to be coaches and get better every day. If you give people the opportunity to lead, they become more invested in the company. As their ideas become reality, they aspire to have even more contributions. It feels good to succeed. Teach the beginners, help them grow, and your company will thrive.

Value every team member. There is no one person on a team that should be underestimated. Everyone is important. The automobile is a great example of teamwork. In order to build a car, someone had to make the tires, someone had to build the components, someone had to mine the copper mine for the wires, and someone had to make and drive the trucks that hauled the copper ore. It takes so many people to make a car, and no one can say that the tire is more important than the copper. The car can’t run without all the parts. Every member of the team is essential.

Teamwork is the key to success. It is often said that if service is beneath you, leadership is beyond you. Someone is sitting the shade today because someone planted a tree long ago. Success is like that—it takes many steps to accomplish your goals, and a lot of hard work. As I always say, success is never owned. It’s rented, and the rent is due every day.

 


Daniel Milstein is the CEO and founder of the Gold Star Family of Companies, operating in over 40 offices worldwide, specializing in financial services, sports management, publishing, and film production. Under Dan’s visionary leadership, Gold Star has been named among Inc. magazine’s 500 Fastest Growing Companies in America. He is a best-selling author and shares his other strategies for success in his new book Rule #1 Don’t Be #2: You Get What You Work For, Not What You Wish For.  Learn more at DanMilstein.com.

Review: Dealstorming by Tim Sanders

CZ2YTDQVAAEn3p2Effective sales methodologies are usually based on a disciplined step by-step process that moves the relationship between buyer and seller from contact to close. The concept of brainstorming — the freewheeling, ad-hoc practice of putting a diverse group of people in a room and letting them throw out ideas without constraints or criticism — seems to be a poor fit for the discipline and focus of the sales deal. Former Yahoo! sales executive Tim Sanders disagrees. He acknowledges that advocates of brainstorming can overstate its effectiveness — recent studies have shown weaknesses in solutions emerging from brainstorming sessions. However, he argues, the brainstorming process also offers certain strengths — the power of collaboration among a wide group of stakeholders and contributors, the openness to innovative ideas — that can be missing in the traditional sales process.

Collaboration is vital: The enduring myth of the individual super-salesperson cutting amazing deals is highly unrealistic in an age of highly complex business-to-business sales. Even those organizations that boast about their sales teams are still probably dealing in sales silos that incorporate little input from other areas of the company. Thus, Sanders has been a long-time practitioner and proponent of what he calls “dealstorming” — a problem-solving methodology that combines the collaborative and inclusive features of brainstorming with the linear discipline of the sales account-management process.

In his fifth book, Dealstorming: The Secret Weapon That Can Solve Your Toughest Sales Challenge, Sanders provides a detailed description of the dealstorming sales process — specifically designed to help salespeople stuck in a deal with an intractable problem. From the sales perspective, the path to innovative solutions for the client is often blocked by other functions of the company that insist that the innovations can’t be developed or implemented, or will be unworkable or ineffective. Frustrated by the resistance, sales professionals refer to these other functions as “the land of no.”

 

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Guest Blog: Creating a Positively (or Negatively) Contagious Culture

Today’s Guest Blogger is author, Anese Cavanaugh. Anese discusses how we can “show up” and use the Super 7 to support our cultivation.

When we talk about creating culture, it’s easy to get sucked into an “outside-in” approach. “What will we do? What are the things we’ll put in place to create an awesome culture?” Free lunches, cool rooftops, foosball tables, karaoke night, field trips, trust building, organizational values roundtables, and other initiatives are all created with the best of intentions. Some of the initiatives are effective and inspiring; while others fall flat, feeling like something being “done to” people or a “box being checked”.

Regardless how many things we do to create an awesome culture, if we’re missing the fundamentals, we’ll only get so far.

We have to look at the being of culture… not just the doing.

In order to bring people along and have them feel invested and engaged, we have to ask questions like, “How do we want to show up? What will we stand for? Who will we have to be to cultivate and nourish the culture we want?” And then we want to invite each other into the conversation.

These questions give us a couple of great places to look.

First, who will YOU be as a leader? How will you show up in order to create the kind of culture you desire?

It all counts.

People often think that culture is up to “the other guy”, “the leadership team”, or the infamous “they”. While these “guys” all play a role in impacting culture, what’s even more accurate and powerful is that each person in an organization (or any system) creates the culture – we emanate the culture we want (or don’t want) to be a part of.

Who the leader is being creates culture, who you are creates the culture, the janitor, the CEO, and everyone else has their own unique stamp on culture creation. We can’t help it. We’re human. We create culture together simply by how we show up.

It starts with how we decide to show up everyday, how we regard others, how accountable we are for our actions, if we walk our talk, what we tolerate, how honest we are, our intentions, our energy, and our presence with others. We are our best bet at creating what we want. And we’re contagious. We set the tone.

This super power can be used for good or bad. Sincerely dig into this idea collaboratively as a team — or even better an organization – and you can create whatever culture you wish.

In addition to showing up, you want to consider what kind of structures, principles, and agreements you have in place to support you and your organization in creating the most healthy and positive container to grow that culture in.

In Contagious Culture I talk about 7 very useful components to consider when setting yourself up for success (or not) in creating a healthy culture. I call these the “Super 7 of Cultural Health”.

Without knowing too much about each of these, I’ll bet you can already start to assess which one’s you and your organization are strong in and which need some TLC.

The Super 7:

  1. Shared values, vision, and purpose
  2. The intention of contribution and service
  3. Safety to show up, speak the truth, and take risks
  4. Curiosity and vulnerability
  5. Accountability and ownership
  6. Reciprocity
  7. Conscious measurement and rewards

When you have these 7 humming (or at least sincerely in process) you build trust, amplify positive energy, and create an environment where people can show up authentically and powerfully at work. Ready? Go. Be. Do.

 

About the Author

Anese Cavanaugh is the author of Contagious Culture: Show Up, Set the Tone, and Intentionally Create an Organization That Thrives. She’s also the creator of the IEP Method® (Intentional Energetic Presence®), a framework for helping people create positive impact.

 

Register Today: How to Create a Positively Contagious Work Culture

IF YOU GO:
How to Create a Positively Contagious Work Culture
Date: March 3, 2016
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Anese Cavanaugh

You are about to enter a new era of leadership. With more competition, more connectedness, and more opportunities than ever before, this exciting new era demands a workplace culture that is collaborative, productive, energized, and contagious.

In this Soundview Live webinar, How to Create a Positively Contagious Work Culture, Anese Cavanaugh offers helpful transformative tools and exercises for improving collaborations, opening communications, and implementing changes. You’ll discover the best methods for handling the toughest challenges, from hiring and firing to strategizing and organizing.

Soundview Live events are FREE to subscribers. Check out our list of upcoming events!

Can’t-Miss Collaboration Tips in CKC’s Executive Edge

One of the biggest challenges faced by today’s companies is how to create strong collaboration amongst the individuals in the organization. For many companies, this task is complicated by the workforce being stretched by geography but tied by technology. Add in to the mix the increasing prevalence of collaboration between a company and its customers, and one finds a climate in which the ability to work together is essential to continued success. The latest issue of CKC’s Executive Edge provides some excellent insight into the best methods to Foster a Culture of Collaboration.

Take a look at what thought leaders are sharing with you in this issue:

Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams (authors of Macrowikinomics) discuss how you can create of a culture of collaboration.

Emmanuel Gobillot (author of Leadershift) explains the unique leadership challenges you may face in the era of mass collaboration.

Jeanne Meister and Karie Willyerd (authors of The 2020 Workplace) provide a vision how your organization will collaborate in the next decade.

John Zenger, Joseph Folkman and Scott Edinger (authors of The Inspiring Leader) explain why the need for team achievements outweighs the draw of any individual accolade

If you have yet to check out an issue of Executive Edge, this is a great place to start! Twice each month, subscribers receive a digital publication devoted to an essential skill for any executive to master. To find out how easy it is for you to subscribe to this skill-building resource, click this link or visit Soundview online at Summary.com.