Strategically Lead with Three New Summaries

Effective leadership is all about strategy. Leaders need thought-out strategies to connect with their employees and customers to develop a unique culture within your organization. Soundview has three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries that help you approach your management or leadership role with valuable strategies.

accountability

by Greg Bustin

Accountability by Greg Bustin Greg Bustin, business and leadership consultant, offers insightful concepts and practical examples from real-life experiences that will increase accountability and drive success for any type of organization in Accountability. He introduces the Seven Pillars of Accountability: character, unity, learning, tracking, urgency, reputation and evolution, and how to sustain a high-performance culture for a thriving business.

 

 

the_purpose_economy

by Aaron Hurst

The Purpose Economy by Aaron Hurst The Purpose Economy describes the shifts in American economy and set of ways in which people and organizations are focused on creating value. Globally recognized entrepreneur Aaron Hurst examines three types of purpose that are transforming the economy: personal, social, and societal. Based on his own personal experiences and interviews with other entrepreneurs, The Purpose Economy is a guide on how to transform your company and career to better serve the world.

 

elevate

by Rich Horwath

Elevate by Rich Horwath Elevate offers leaders and executives with an outline for developing advanced strategic thinking approach. Strategy expert Rich Horwath focuses on advanced strategic thinking that will drive results in the short-and long-term. His three-discipline approach breaks strategy down into its fundamentals: Coalesce, Compete and Champion and how to apply it to your day-to-day tasks.

The Key is to Care

LEGENDARY SERVICE

Fable Unfolds ICARE Essentials
Written with two veteran consultants of the Ken Blanchard Companies, Kathy Cuff and Vicki Halsey, management guru Ken Blanchard’s latest fable offering is Legendary Service, which focuses on customer service. The story focuses on an employee working in the Home and Office section of a large discount store who strives to apply the lessons she is learning in a customer service class she is taking at a local university. In those classes her professor lays out the ICARE customer service model.

The Framework

The five elements of the authors’ ICARE model are:
Ideal Service. The focus here is on consistent dayto- day service, which the authors describe as employees striving to meet customer needs because they truly believe that service is important. In the fable, the heroine of the story, Kelsey, exemplifies Ideal Service by jeopardizing a sure sale for the benefit of the customer: she confirms to that customer that the vacuum cleaner he’s decided to purchase for his wife’s birthday is not a great present.
Culture of Service. Going beyond individualized day-to-day service, write the authors, a culture of service creates the environment in which employees are inspired to focus on the customer and are held accountable for carrying out the company’s service vision. While Kelsey’s employer displays a complete lack of service culture, various businesses that cross Kelsey’s path, including the physical therapy practice rehabilitating her grandmother’s injury, illustrate the hallmarks of a service culture, including a posted service vision for the company.
Attentiveness. This element of the model involves knowing customers and their preferences well. Kelsey is led through the exercise of creating a customer profile: the various categories of customers she serves and their respective needs and preferences.
Responsiveness. Knowing your customers is a first step; the next step is knowing how to respond to their needs. In the story, Kelsey’s colleague deals with a customer who is unhappy that the store no longer matches competitors’ prices, in this case for a lamp. The colleague notes that the competitor charges extra for the lamp shade, thus making his store’s lamp actually less expensive. “Kelsey was impressed,” the authors write, “not only with the way Rob had listened to his customer and solved the problem to her satisfaction but also with his knowledge of the other store’s pricing policy.”
Empowerment. The final letter in the book’s customer service model is for empowerment: employees having the freedom to take the initiative to implement their company’s service vision. Both Kelsey and her manager want to turn around the store’s poor customer service reputation and yet are continuously hampered by a leadership that focuses only on the bottom line.

Legendary Service is successful because most readers will be able to relate the fictional characters and events to actual people and situations: the people-oriented small business owner represented by the physical therapy practice owner; the small business that dresses up its facilities but offers terrible customer service, such as the fancy hair salon Kelsey walks out of; the stores that offer the same products but with completely different customer service cultures, illustrated by the two competing discount stores at the heart of the fable. The situations are authentic, and the conflict that moves the story forward – will Kelsey quit and join the competitor as her own store goes from bad to worse? – will keep readers engaged. And if there is a bit of a deus ex machina ending, why not? It worked for Jane Austen.

Turning Around the Troubled Company

Turning around floundering companies requires effective management at all levels of the organization. But how is this achieved? What must management do to be effective?

Jim Burkett knows something about making the right things happen. He has turned around twenty-eight underperforming and troubled companies, from Fortune 500 companies to smaller public and private companies, throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Burkett has come up with a tool kit for turning around companies that includes:

  • Planning
  • Organizing
  • Measuring performance
  • Executing
  • Following-up
  • Real-time reporting
  • Problem solving

If you are facing the daunting task of helping to turn around your company, then you’ll want to join us for our Soundview Live webinar The Learned Disciplines of Management, coming up on July 29th. You’ll hear more about his tool kit along with practical examples of how turnarounds can happen.

Join us and invite your whole management team. And make sure to bring your questions to post for Jim to answer during the webinar.

Book Review: Moments of Impact

by Lisa Kay Solomon and Chris Ertel

by Lisa Kay Solomon and Chris Ertel

Challenges frequently arise during the work week. To tackle these challenges, “strategy meetings” are put in place. These meetings are familiar to employees in the corporate world. You sit around and bounce ideas back and forth until you hopefully have that “ah-ha” moment. But there may be a more effective way. According to Chris Ertel and Lisa Kay Solomon, there is a simple, creative process for both leaders and their teams to come to solutions for their challenges. In their book Moments of Impact: How to Design Strategic Conversations That Accelerate Change, the authors describe the five core principles for designing strategic conversations. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

Ertel and Solomon spell out how to make the most of your meetings in Moment of Impact. They present a powerful tool by focusing on the challenge at hand and focusing your meeting around it. “Designing a strategic conversation,” they write, “means creating a shared experience where the most pressing strategic issues facing an organization are openly explored from a variety of angles.” The authors then further discuss the core principles of a well-designed strategic conversation. The principle include defining the purpose, engaging multiple perspectives, framing the issues, setting the scene, and making it an experience.

Moments of Impact offers insight on how you can have more effective meetings with strategic conversations through the five core principles. The ultimate goal is to get solutions to the challenges that arise through a more structured process using these key practices, instead of brainstorming sessions that may not lead to any conclusion. With a concrete process that can be implemented at any meeting, Moments of Impact, will help any meeting-goer make the most of their moment.

How Gamification Motivates People to Do Extraordinary Things

GAMIFY

Motivation for Gamification

Gamification describes the use of game mechanics and experience design – a story line, for instance – to digitally engage employees and customers, writes Gartner consultant Brian Burke in his gamification primer, Gamify.

As with many new technological trends in the workplace, gamification is often misunderstood or overhyped, Burke writes. Gamification does not mean turning work processes into a video game (giving a sales manager a virtual gun and turning individual salespeople into virtual targets does not motivate salespeople to be more competitive). Nor will a game turn a dreary job into a fun-filled, joyful exercise. What gamification can accomplish, he writes, is to motivate people to change their behaviors or to develop their skills, and can also drive innovation.

Three Elements of Motivation

Gamification works because it addresses the three elements of motivation:

Autonomy. Gamification allows people to opt in, then make their own choices as they proceed through the game.

Mastery. Everyone has a deep-seated desire to improve and make progress. Perhaps full mastery is not possible in gamification as in real life, but gamification provides the constant positive feedback that motivates people to keep trying harder.

Purpose. Gamification is different from traditional games because there is an overriding purpose. Unlike a game, which is simply created to entertain, gamification “engages players at an emotional level to help them achieve a goal that is meaningful to them,” Burke writes.

For example, Burke describes how a hospital for children developed a game app to encourage sick children to keep up their pain journals. These journals are important for doctors to know which treatments are working, but children, especially those having a bad day, are not always motivated to fill out the journal. With the iPhone “Pain Squad” app, children become members of a police force who progress through the ranks depending on how many days in a row they fill in their journals.

Three Audiences

Gamified solutions are usually targeted at one of three audiences: employees, customers and communities of interest (for example, ecologically-minded people who through Internet-based gamification are encouraged to recycle).

The Pain Squad example above illustrated how gamification was able to engage customers – in this case, the sick children – to change their behaviors. Barclaycards uses gamification to engage customers in driving innovation for their Barclaycard Ring credit card. This low-rate credit card is unique because it operates as a separate profit center, and “profits generated by the community are shared with the community,” Burke writes. Through status tiers (bronze, silver, gold, platinum and palladium) and badges, Barclayscard Ring members are pushed to participate in developing the community by suggesting or voting on ideas that would improve the product, or taking such actions as recruiting new members.

NTT Data uses its Ignite Leadership game to identify and develop leadership skills among their employees, many of whom are dispersed to various client sites, some of them for years and even decades. Under such circumstances, they lose their connection with the company. Ignite Leadership creates real-world-scenario questions and allows the player to choose among a multitude of options; there is no right answer. The training is structured as a journey, with points and badges awarded at different levels and a leaderboard that shows player rankings.

These are just three of Burke’s many examples as he illustrates the wide variety of situations in which gamification can be used. In the second half of the book, Burke offers a detailed, step-by-step process for gamification, starting with defining the business outcomes, target audiences, and player goals and moving on to such issues as the player engagement model (for example, is the game collaborative or competitive, emergent with an unknown outcome or scripted?).

In Gamify, Burke reveals the full complexity and potential of gamification but presents his material in a succinct, clearly organized manual that will motivate leaders to follow the example of the successful companies featured in the book.