Don’t miss our next webinar! 10/25 with Steve Cockram

soundview webinar speakerHow to Discover Your Leadership Voice

Date: Tuesday, October 25
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Steve Cockram

Click here to register!

In order to lead others effectively, we need a true understanding of ourselves, our natural tendencies and patterns of behavior. Are you focused on relationships, values, and people? Or are you oriented more toward tradition, money, and resources? Do you know how others hear your voice? Do you appreciate the contributions of others on your team?

In this Soundview Live webinar, How to Discover Your Leadership Voice, Steve Cockram will help you identify your natural leadership style, and give you a framework for leveraging your strengths.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to find your foundational leadership voice
  • How to hear and value the voices of others
  • How to know yourself before leading others
  • How to connect and communicate well with team, family and friends

FREE webinar with Ken Blanchard – Tuesday, 10/18!

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Speaker, Leadership/Business Guru, and Author of over 50 books, including The One Minute Manager

Learn How to Lead at a Higher Level
with Ken Blanchard

Effective leadership is needed at work, home, and in the community. Now is the time to discover the personal “leadership point of view” all great leaders possess- and apply it throughout your entire life.

Click here to register for FREE

In this FREE Soundview Live webinar, How to Lead at a Higher Level, Ken Blanchard brings together everything he’s learned about world-class leadership. This webinar extends Blanchard’s breakthrough work on delivering legendary customer service, creating “raving fans,” and building “Partnerships for Performance” that empower everyone who works for and with you.

You will learn:

  • How to create targets and visions based on the “triple bottom line”
  • Coaching techniques for creating higher-level leaders
  • How to create a higher-level culture throughout your organization

How to Make Powerful and Positive Changes in Your Organization

Date: Wednesday, September 7th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Steven D. Goldstein

Click here to register

Dysfunction within large organizations is so prevalent that most people either accept it as an inevitable fact of corporate life or assume someone else will deal with it. But must it be this way? Steven D. Goldstein answers this question with a resounding, “No!”

In this Soundview Live webinar, How to Make Powerful and Positive Changes in Your Organization, Steven Goldstein explains the nature of dysfunction present in most companies and other organizations, why it occurs, and most importantly, what leaders, at all levels, can do to tackle these issues and improve performance.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Proven techniques for solving problems and improving performance
  • How to understand and utilize the Five Principles of Engagement
  • How top leaders can improve the way they interact with their teams, employees, and customers

Build and Extend Trust in the Workplace

When we extend trust, we generate trust; when we withhold trust, we generate distrust. According to Stephen M.R. Covey, Greg Link and Rebecca R. Merrill in Smart Trust, our actions lead either toward a virtuous upward cycle of prosperity, energy and joy or toward a vicious downward cycle that eventually results in the destruction of those outcomes.

Either we add to the renaissance of trust, or we contribute to the crisis of trust –– in our personal lives, our families, our communities, our teams, our organizations, our nations and our world. It’s not enough to merely give lip service to the idea of trust. It’s not enough to use trust as a pragmatic technique in certain situations when it’s to our advantage. It’s not enough to trust only once in a while, when we think there is no risk involved.

The greatest and lasting dividends of trust come only when we choose trust as our underlying approach –– the operating system, if you will, that consistently governs our day-in and day-out choices and decisions. The actions of high-trust individuals, teams and organizations worldwide grow out of three specific beliefs about trust:

1. A belief in being worthy of trust. At the root of the belief in trust is a belief in trustworthiness or credibility –– in the importance of acting with character and competence so that both you and others know that you can be trusted. Leaders who have a core belief in trustworthiness do not consider that belief as merely a practical option or as a technique to get what they want in a particular situation. Rather, they are committed to being trustworthy even when it’s hard, even when there’s a price to pay. In fact, we might say that the real test of trustworthiness and credibility is doing the right thing, especially when there’s a cost or consequence.

2. A belief that most people can be trusted. Successful high-trust people and companies create their success by choosing to believe that most people can be trusted –– not all people (that wouldn’t be smart), but most people. When companies and leaders choose to believe that most people can be trusted, it plays out in organizational design, affecting systems, processes, structures and even strategies.

3. A belief that extending trust is a better way to lead. Successful high-trust leaders believe that extending trust is a better way to lead, primarily because trust inspires people to perform, it’s reciprocated, and it ultimately leads to greater prosperity, energy and joy. In order to increase influence and grow trust in a team, an organization, a community, a family or a relationship, someone has to take the first step. That’s what leaders do. They go first. They lead out in extending trust.

In fact, the first job of a leader is to inspire trust, and the second is to extend it. This is true whether a person has a formal leadership role, such as CEO, a manager, team leader or parent, or an informal role of influence, such as work associate, marriage partner or friend. Bottom line, if we’re not inspiring and extending trust, we’re not leading. We might be managing or administering, but we’re not leading. We manage things; we lead people. And real leadership requires trust.


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A Manager’s Guide to Getting Results –– Without Losing Your Soul


Winning Well by Karin Hurt and David Dye

It can feel like a rigged game. Executives set aggressive goals, so managers drive their teams to burnout trying to deliver. Or, employees seek connection and support, so managers focus on relationships . . . and fail to make the numbers. The fallout is stress, frustration and disengagement, and not just among team members –– two-thirds of managers report being disengaged. To succeed, managers cannot choose between results and relationships. They need both: They must get people to achieve while creating an environment that makes them truly want to.

Winning Well offers managers a quick, practical action plan. They will learn how to stamp out the corrosive win-at-all-costs mentality; focus on the game, not just the score; reinforce behaviors that produce results; sustain energy and momentum; correct poor performance without drama; build productive relationships; and be the leader people want to work for. Today’s hypercompetitive economy has created tense, overextended workplaces. Keep it productive, rewarding and even fun with this one-stop success kit.

• Why Winning Well doesn’t mean perfection.
• Why you should emphasize behaviors, not the metrics scorecard.
• The four principles of managers who win well.
• How to lead meetings and make decisions that inspire your team.
• To help your team solve problems, double productivity and own their results.


Sharpen Your Role as Manager

Show Trust to Earn Trust

Trust is a lot like faith. You can have faith in people only if you don’t try to control their actions, Eric Chester points out in On Fire at Work. The moment you begin to monitor their every move, out goes that faith.

It’s no surprise that many employers don’t really trust their employees. After all, it’s the employer’s business, their department, their division at stake. It’s their butt on the line if something goes wrong.

Trust is the foundational element of any healthy relationship. For the relationship to work, both sides need some independence –– some autonomy –– lest they suffocate from too much smothering.

Where the problem comes in is when leaders want their employees to give their all while doing exactly what they’re told –– no more, no less.

In this day and age, some companies still expect employees to be humbly submissive and overly dependent on their managers’ orders and oversight. The way they see it, employees are like children: watched so they don’t misbehave. Halted in their tracks before they ever make a mistake. Employees arrive late, take long lunches, slack off, don’t care about what’s good for the company, and take every opportunity to exploit any chink in the carefully constructed corporate armor so they can kill time and goof off. Then to top it all off, they leave early if no one’s watching. The way managers see it, they have to crack the whip in order to keep the place from becoming a freewheeling fun fest or a sea of inertia.

Let’s be clear: Employees who behave and act this way do exist. Want them to do the jobs they were hired to do instead of breaking their backs to get the hell out of Dodge? Leaders who are seeking on-fire performance from their employees need to be the ones to lead the charge. They need to show trust in order to earn trust.

On-fire employees –– the kind you’re looking to hire and keep –– are looking for some latitude to make decisions in the workplace. The best companies in the world, in turn, trust and empower those employees to think and act on their own –– everyone wins!

Take the best elements of entrepreneurism –– independence, creativity, passion and a desire to succeed –– and match them with each employee’s day-to-day responsibilities. Then build a workplace environment where all of those employees perform as if it’s their own company. A culture of autonomy involves not just trust from the employer but also accountability from the employee.

It’s a two-way street. Telling employees they can start working in the way that fits them best without providing any guidance or overarching goals is like giving them permission to jump out of a plane without a ‘chute. Cultures that promote autonomy need employees to work toward targeted, concrete objectives –– priorities and deadlines set by the company or manager.


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Review: #AskGaryVee by Gary Vaynerchuk

#AskGaryVeeGary Vaynerchuk is the prototypical social-media business success. The son of a wine shop owner, Vaynerchuk started a video blog called Wine Library TV — a quirky discussion about wine by a young man who loved the Jets and spoke about which wines fit best with Lucky Charms. Ten years later, Vaynerchuk is a highly successful social-media entrepreneur and, through his firm VaynerMedia, a sought-after consultant advising Fortune 500 companies. He is also a New York Times best-selling author. And since 2014, he is the host of #AskGaryVee, another YouTube show that, this time, is focused on helping his listeners succeed as entrepreneurs.

He brings that same mandate to his latest book, #AskGaryVee. Based on questions from his viewers, #AskGaryVee is a highly valuable primer on what works in social-media entrepreneurialism and in entrepreneurialism in general. For example, his advice to worry about the top line and not the bottom line when building a business (which aligns with his advice to solopreneurs that “cash is oxygen”) is compelling given Vaynerchuk’s meteoric rise to riches.

Of course, Vaynerchuk is first and foremost a social-media expert, and his concise overview of all the important social-media platforms that exist today is alone worth the price of the book. Another typically illuminating chapter is entitled “Content and Context,” in which he answers questions related to building compelling content and gaining exposure for that content.

For example, one viewer asked him how to get people to engage in a new and small channel. The answer: quality and hustle. “That’s all you can do: put out great content, engage with your tiny audience, and go out and try to get exposure for your content by collaborating or getting press or guest posting on someone else’s platform,” he writes. Many of the questions are quite specific. One viewer asks, for example, if he should avoid doing podcasts or videos because he has an accent. Vaynerchuk points to Google co-founder Sergey Brin and replies that accents should not stop the questioner (adding that if he doesn’t get an audience, it isn’t because of the accent). Another questioner asks whether short or long videos are better; Vaynerchuk answers that it doesn’t matter. He himself broke the commonly accepted “shorter-is-better” rule when he launched WLTV, which consisted of 40-minute videos.

Every chapter in #AskGaryVee is filled with this type of clear-cut, specific advice generated by the questions from his fans.

Click here to read the full review, or sign up for our FREE executive book alert to receive free book reviews in your inbox every month!

Don’t Miss Our Next Soundview Live Webinar!

Tools to Become an Authentic Leader

Date: Thursday, July 7th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Dr. Karissa Thacker

Click here to register

Some are born to lead, other must be taught, but all leaders must work to retain their own values and basic sense of self. When it comes to maintaining sustainable success in your organization, authenticity is key.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Tools to Become an Authentic Leader, Dr. Karissa Thacker will show you how to broaden and deepen your effectiveness by presenting the most appropriate side of yourself.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to become authentic in a way that befits your values
  • How to show loyalty, honesty, ethics, and consideration
  • How to maintain authenticity in leadership roles
  • How to make conscious choices instead of blind reactions

Review: The Go-Giver Leader by Bob Burg and John David Mann

TheGo-GiverLeaderAt first glance, the setup for Bob Burg and John David Mann’s fable, The Go-Giver Leader, seems to be only tangentially about leadership. The main protagonist, Ben, is trying to close an M&A deal: He has been charged by his company to persuade the leaders of an acquisition target — a manufacturer of high-quality chairs — to let his firm buy the company.

While Ben is not in a leadership position, the authors convincingly demonstrate that Ben’s assignment requires him to do what leaders must do if they are to be successful: convince others to take action because they want to. By not having the power over those he’s trying to convince, Ben’s situation accurately reflects the current state of leadership today: Your title doesn’t buy you respect, and a command-and-control leadership style leads to the disengagement of those you lead — and eventual failure as a leader.

When he first arrives on the scene, Ben is convinced that his success depends on “take, take, take”: taking control, taking charge of the situation, taking command.

As the book advances, Ben meets the four company executives he must convince to sell. These four executives are each portrayed as successful leaders who inspire their employees and managers. Each of these four also represents four different facets of leadership.

Allen, one of two brothers who co-founded the company, represents vision. Through his conversation with Allen, Ben learns that the challenge is not to have a vision but to keep people focused on the vision — what Allen describes as “holding the vision.” This facet of leadership is summarized as leading from the mind.

Augustine, the other brother, represents empathy, or leading from the heart. One of the key lessons Ben learns is that pull is more effective than push. Counterintuitively, the more you yield, the more power you have.

Frank, the VP of production who has been with the company since its founding, represents grounding — that is, getting the job done. The best leaders, Ben learns, are people who can actually do the work. The key attribute here is to lead from the gut.

Finally, Karen, the VP of Finance and Personnel, represents the soul of the company. Karen is very supportive of employees undergoing life-changing, personal challenges. Through Karen, Ben learns the importance of leading with your soul.

With the help of a mysterious mentor — the friend of a friend whom he meets for daily lunches in a local restaurant, Ben is able to develop his four keys to legendary leadership:

1) Hold the Vision, 2) Build Your People, 3) Do the Work and 4) Stand for Something. Ben, however, learns the fifth and decisive key to leadership — Practice Giving Leadership — on his own (with a little help from his mentor) at the turning-point moment in the book. Giving leadership is based on the philosophy that great leadership is never about the leader. You are not the “deal,” which is, in fact, the reverse of “lead.” At the climax, Ben discovers that, indeed, “the best way to increase your influence is to give it away.” Burg and Mann, authors of the best-seller The Go-Giver Leader, have written a compelling fable that succeeds as both a thought-provoking learning tool and, rather surprisingly, as a work of fiction with an unexpected plot twist at the end

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Review: Under New Management by David Burkus

Speed Review: Under New Management“Management,” declares business school professor and author David Burkus in the introduction to his new book, “needs new management.” According to Burkus, too many companies are clinging to old assumptions, old processes and old habits that have grown obsolete. In Under New Management: How Leading Organizations Are Upending Business as Usual, he introduces a number of modern, sometimes surprising, approaches to management that directly challenge past practices and attitudes.

Burkus describes, for example, how some companies let employees take as much time off as they want. There is no allocation and monitoring of vacation days: If you want to take a vacation, take a vacation. Burkus also describes the concept of paying employees to quit. The longer you’ve worked at a company, the more cash you will get paid for quitting (up to a certain threshold).

A sample of the other new management approaches covered in the book includes:
• Banning emails
• Eliminating managers
• Making salaries transparent
• Abandoning open-office layouts
• Putting customers second.

Although they may sound counter-intuitive, if not fanciful in some cases, all of the new approaches presented by Burkus have been successfully implemented. The concept of paying employees to quit, for example, was made famous by Zappos, which will pay $4,000 in cash if new employees quit their jobs. Amazon has pushed the concept even further, offering cash for quitting once a year (the offer is a one-off at Zappos). The first year, employees are offered $2,000 to quit, and the offer goes up $1,000 every year after that until it reaches $5,000. The annual offer then stays at the $5,000 level.

Eliminating managers is one of the more surprising concepts in the book, yet it has also been successfully implemented. Burkus describes how new employees at Valve Software, an online gaming development firm estimated to be valued at $3 to $4 billion, have to get used to the fact that no one will tell them what to do.

Click here to read this review in full.

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