Review: #AskGaryVee by Gary Vaynerchuk

#AskGaryVeeGary Vaynerchuk is the prototypical social-media business success. The son of a wine shop owner, Vaynerchuk started a video blog called Wine Library TV — a quirky discussion about wine by a young man who loved the Jets and spoke about which wines fit best with Lucky Charms. Ten years later, Vaynerchuk is a highly successful social-media entrepreneur and, through his firm VaynerMedia, a sought-after consultant advising Fortune 500 companies. He is also a New York Times best-selling author. And since 2014, he is the host of #AskGaryVee, another YouTube show that, this time, is focused on helping his listeners succeed as entrepreneurs.

He brings that same mandate to his latest book, #AskGaryVee. Based on questions from his viewers, #AskGaryVee is a highly valuable primer on what works in social-media entrepreneurialism and in entrepreneurialism in general. For example, his advice to worry about the top line and not the bottom line when building a business (which aligns with his advice to solopreneurs that “cash is oxygen”) is compelling given Vaynerchuk’s meteoric rise to riches.

Of course, Vaynerchuk is first and foremost a social-media expert, and his concise overview of all the important social-media platforms that exist today is alone worth the price of the book. Another typically illuminating chapter is entitled “Content and Context,” in which he answers questions related to building compelling content and gaining exposure for that content.

For example, one viewer asked him how to get people to engage in a new and small channel. The answer: quality and hustle. “That’s all you can do: put out great content, engage with your tiny audience, and go out and try to get exposure for your content by collaborating or getting press or guest posting on someone else’s platform,” he writes. Many of the questions are quite specific. One viewer asks, for example, if he should avoid doing podcasts or videos because he has an accent. Vaynerchuk points to Google co-founder Sergey Brin and replies that accents should not stop the questioner (adding that if he doesn’t get an audience, it isn’t because of the accent). Another questioner asks whether short or long videos are better; Vaynerchuk answers that it doesn’t matter. He himself broke the commonly accepted “shorter-is-better” rule when he launched WLTV, which consisted of 40-minute videos.

Every chapter in #AskGaryVee is filled with this type of clear-cut, specific advice generated by the questions from his fans.

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Don’t Miss Our Next Soundview Live Webinar!

Tools to Become an Authentic Leader

Date: Thursday, July 7th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Dr. Karissa Thacker

Click here to register

Some are born to lead, other must be taught, but all leaders must work to retain their own values and basic sense of self. When it comes to maintaining sustainable success in your organization, authenticity is key.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Tools to Become an Authentic Leader, Dr. Karissa Thacker will show you how to broaden and deepen your effectiveness by presenting the most appropriate side of yourself.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to become authentic in a way that befits your values
  • How to show loyalty, honesty, ethics, and consideration
  • How to maintain authenticity in leadership roles
  • How to make conscious choices instead of blind reactions

Review: The Go-Giver Leader by Bob Burg and John David Mann

TheGo-GiverLeaderAt first glance, the setup for Bob Burg and John David Mann’s fable, The Go-Giver Leader, seems to be only tangentially about leadership. The main protagonist, Ben, is trying to close an M&A deal: He has been charged by his company to persuade the leaders of an acquisition target — a manufacturer of high-quality chairs — to let his firm buy the company.

While Ben is not in a leadership position, the authors convincingly demonstrate that Ben’s assignment requires him to do what leaders must do if they are to be successful: convince others to take action because they want to. By not having the power over those he’s trying to convince, Ben’s situation accurately reflects the current state of leadership today: Your title doesn’t buy you respect, and a command-and-control leadership style leads to the disengagement of those you lead — and eventual failure as a leader.

When he first arrives on the scene, Ben is convinced that his success depends on “take, take, take”: taking control, taking charge of the situation, taking command.

As the book advances, Ben meets the four company executives he must convince to sell. These four executives are each portrayed as successful leaders who inspire their employees and managers. Each of these four also represents four different facets of leadership.

Allen, one of two brothers who co-founded the company, represents vision. Through his conversation with Allen, Ben learns that the challenge is not to have a vision but to keep people focused on the vision — what Allen describes as “holding the vision.” This facet of leadership is summarized as leading from the mind.

Augustine, the other brother, represents empathy, or leading from the heart. One of the key lessons Ben learns is that pull is more effective than push. Counterintuitively, the more you yield, the more power you have.

Frank, the VP of production who has been with the company since its founding, represents grounding — that is, getting the job done. The best leaders, Ben learns, are people who can actually do the work. The key attribute here is to lead from the gut.

Finally, Karen, the VP of Finance and Personnel, represents the soul of the company. Karen is very supportive of employees undergoing life-changing, personal challenges. Through Karen, Ben learns the importance of leading with your soul.

With the help of a mysterious mentor — the friend of a friend whom he meets for daily lunches in a local restaurant, Ben is able to develop his four keys to legendary leadership:

1) Hold the Vision, 2) Build Your People, 3) Do the Work and 4) Stand for Something. Ben, however, learns the fifth and decisive key to leadership — Practice Giving Leadership — on his own (with a little help from his mentor) at the turning-point moment in the book. Giving leadership is based on the philosophy that great leadership is never about the leader. You are not the “deal,” which is, in fact, the reverse of “lead.” At the climax, Ben discovers that, indeed, “the best way to increase your influence is to give it away.” Burg and Mann, authors of the best-seller The Go-Giver Leader, have written a compelling fable that succeeds as both a thought-provoking learning tool and, rather surprisingly, as a work of fiction with an unexpected plot twist at the end

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Review: Under New Management by David Burkus

Speed Review: Under New Management“Management,” declares business school professor and author David Burkus in the introduction to his new book, “needs new management.” According to Burkus, too many companies are clinging to old assumptions, old processes and old habits that have grown obsolete. In Under New Management: How Leading Organizations Are Upending Business as Usual, he introduces a number of modern, sometimes surprising, approaches to management that directly challenge past practices and attitudes.

Burkus describes, for example, how some companies let employees take as much time off as they want. There is no allocation and monitoring of vacation days: If you want to take a vacation, take a vacation. Burkus also describes the concept of paying employees to quit. The longer you’ve worked at a company, the more cash you will get paid for quitting (up to a certain threshold).

A sample of the other new management approaches covered in the book includes:
• Banning emails
• Eliminating managers
• Making salaries transparent
• Abandoning open-office layouts
• Putting customers second.

Although they may sound counter-intuitive, if not fanciful in some cases, all of the new approaches presented by Burkus have been successfully implemented. The concept of paying employees to quit, for example, was made famous by Zappos, which will pay $4,000 in cash if new employees quit their jobs. Amazon has pushed the concept even further, offering cash for quitting once a year (the offer is a one-off at Zappos). The first year, employees are offered $2,000 to quit, and the offer goes up $1,000 every year after that until it reaches $5,000. The annual offer then stays at the $5,000 level.

Eliminating managers is one of the more surprising concepts in the book, yet it has also been successfully implemented. Burkus describes how new employees at Valve Software, an online gaming development firm estimated to be valued at $3 to $4 billion, have to get used to the fact that no one will tell them what to do.

Click here to read this review in full.

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Join Us for a Webinar on 5/10: Return On Integrity: The New Definition of ROI

Webinar: Return On Integrity: The New Definition of ROIReturn on Integrity: The New Definition of ROI
Featuring author, John G. Blumberg
Tuesday, May 10, 2016 | 12:00 PM
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Core values are not just a guide; they should be the basis of every decision and action in your professional life. They have been featured in countless books over the last decade, but none has taken the search as deep or has focused on the intersection of leaders’ personal values and those of your organization.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Return On Integrity: The New Definition of ROI, John G. Blumberg does precisely that. Blumberg asks CEOs and top leadership to dig deep, to discover the most untapped strategic resource available to you as a leader. This is your chance to truly discover the core values you live by and, in turn, engage an impactful set of core values for the organization you lead.

YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO:

  • identify the core values you live by and apply them to your professional life
  • achieve personal and professional integrity through in-depth introspection
  • lead your organization beyond profit to a more truthful and fulfilling bottom line

Show Up, Set the Tone and Intentionally Create an Organization That Thrives

The key to any company’s success lies in its culture. This game-changing guide shows you how to shape and revitalize your culture –– by setting the tone, engaging the team and creating a dynamic working environment that encourages growth, productivity and innovation. It all starts with you.

Using award-winning organizational advisor Anese Cavanaugh’s unique IEP Method ®, you can take control of the culture you work in and build a healthier, more functional environment –– from the inside out. You’ll learn how to enhance your Intentional Energetic Presence (IEP) so you’ll always be fully present, purposeful and prepared to share your vision with infectious energy and enthusiasm. Contagious Culture is so much more than a leadership guide. It’s a complete cultural mindshift that’s not only exciting for you and your team –– it’s absolutely, positively contagious.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO:
• Craft your intention and make a real impact.
• Unleash your energy –– and watch it spread like wildfire.
• Show up for others by setting yourself up for success.
• Bring out the best in everyone –– including yourself.

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Review: Originals by Adam Grant

Throughout history, there have been extraordinary people who, in Wharton professor Adam Grant’s elegant phrase, “moved the world.” Grant calls these people “originals” because they are nonconformists who are unimpressed with the status quo and have the creativity and courage to forge and follow their own paths. As he explains in Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, originals can be inventors, entrepreneurs, authors and painters, leaders of political movements. Martin Luther King was an original. So was Leonardo Da Vinci, and so is Bill Gates.

Originals, however, are not just world-famous people who revolutionized their domains. Grant also tells the story of originals whose names would be unknown to most: Carmen Medina, the CIA employee who battled for years to finally incorporate the digital age into intelligence sharing; Rick Ludwin, the TV executive who, despite not working in the comedy department, championed a rejected sitcom by comedian Jerry Seinfeld; Ray Dalio, the billionaire founder of a company who encouraged employees to send him memos such as the one that begins, “Ray, you deserve a ‘D’ for your performance today … It was obvious to all of us that you did not prepare at all …”

In Originals, Grant not only offers stories of great accomplishments but also dissects exactly how these accomplishments were achieved. He debunks the idea that originals are great risk-takers. Most of America’s founding fathers were reluctant revolutionaries. Martin Luther King writes that he was pushed into service as leader of the Montgomery Bus Boycott before he had a chance to say “no.” Bill Gates eventually dropped out of college but only after first securing a leave of absence from the university and ensuring that his parents would support him. Originals, Grant argues, are more risk-mitigators than risk-takers.

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Join Us for a FREE webinar with Best-Selling Author and Business Leader, Patrick Lencioni

lencioniRegistration is now open for the FREE Patrick Lencioni webinar “How to Be the Ideal Team Player” presented by Soundview on Thursday, May 5th at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

Register today and get a FREE summary of Lencioni’s book, The Ideal Team Player.

Whether you’re a leader trying to create a culture around teamwork, a staffing professional looking to hire real team players, or a team player wanting to improve yourself, this webinar offers applicable tips for your career.

In this FREE Soundview Live webinar, How to Be the Ideal Team Player, Patrick Lencioni uses a fable to dissect the ins and outs of an ideal team player. Lencioni tells the story of Jeff Shanley, a leader desperate to save his uncle’s company by restoring its cultural commitment to teamwork. Jeff must crack the code on the virtues that real team players possess, and then build a culture of hiring and development around those virtues.

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You Will Learn:

  • The three indispensable virtues of an ideal team player
  • A practical framework and actionable tools for identifying, hiring, and developing ideal team players
  • How to improve your ability to lead and be an active team player

About the Speaker:

Patrick Lencioni is founder and president of The Table Group, a firm dedicated to helping leaders improve their organizations’ health since 1997. His principles have been embraced by leaders around the world and adopted by organizations of virtually every kind including multinational corporations, entrepreneurial ventures, professional sports teams, the military, nonprofits, schools, and churches.

Lencioni is the author of ten business books with over three million copies sold worldwide. His work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Bloomberg Businessweek, and USA Today.

How Great Leaders Change Their Minds to Change the World

As a leader, changing your mind has always been perceived as a weakness. Not anymore. In a world that’s changing fast, successful leaders realize that a genuine willingness to change their minds is the ultimate competitive advantage. Drawing on evidence from social science, history, politics and more, business consultant Al Pittampalli reveals why confidence, consistency and conviction are increasingly becoming liabilities — while humility, inconsistency and radical open-mindedness are powerful leadership assets.
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In Persuadable, you’ll learn why being persuadable yields accuracy, agility and growth. But Pittampalli doesn’t just explain why you should be persuadable. Distilling cutting edge research from cognitive and social psychology, he shows you precisely how by outlining seven key practices: consider the opposite, update your beliefs incrementally, kill your darlings, take the perspective of others, avoid being too persuadable, convert early and take on your own tribe.Through clear and compelling descriptions and stories, you’ll learn exactly how to practice the art of persuadability. Rife with actionable advice, Persuadable is an invaluable guide for today’s datadriven, results-oriented leader.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:

  • Why persuadability is especially suited for today’s business environment.
  • The seven practices of persuadability and strategies for using them.
  • Why it’s often better to persuade your own tribe before you try to convert others

Review: Extreme Ownership By Jocko Willink, Leif Babin

Transporting military leadership lessons to the business world is not new, as demonstrated by the continuing popularity with managers of The Art of War, a 2000-year-old Chinese treatise on warfare. However, it may be difficult to find a more compelling, tension-filled yet clearly applicable business text than Jocko Willink and Leif Babin’s book, Extreme Ownership.

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Former Navy SEAL officers Willink and Babin, who now run a leadership consultancy called Echelon Front, built on the lessons of their battlefield experiences, base Extreme Ownership on the battle of Ramadi, a major 2006 offensive by allied forces to purge the Al-Qaeda presence in this large Iraqi city. Ramadi is a city of 400,000 people, and the battle was therefore a difficult and deadly streetby-street, building-by-building conquest in which “every piece of trash [was] a potential IED [improvised exploding device], every window, door, balcony and rooftop a potential enemy firing position,” the authors write.

Each chapter in the book begins with a scene from the battle (the authors note that they have taken extra precautions to prevent any specific tactics, techniques and procedures from being revealed in the book, and in fact, the book was cleared by military authorities).

After the narrative of the battlefield event is completed, the authors then provide the core principle to be learned from the event. The authors then, in what is one of the most valuable sections of each chapter, demonstrate how the lesson learned is applied to a real-world business case.

For example, the title of the book is Extreme Ownership, and this refers to one of the authors’ key leadership principles: leaders must take complete — even “extreme” — ownership for anything and everything that happens in the unit or organization that they lead. The chapter begins……..(click here to read the full review)