Take Back Control with These Three New Summaries

Feeling as if you have no control over your work or job duties can lead to job stress. When the stress of constant connection and rapid changes in the marketplace start affecting your performance at work, applying new processes to your daily routine could bring great success. Learn how to take back control and handle the high demands by developing mindfulness, collaborating with others, and knowing when to think like a rookie with these three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries.

overworkedandoverwhelmed

by Scott Eblin

Overworked and Overwhelmed by Scott Eblin

Top leadership coach Scott Eblin provides simple routines to reduce stress and sustain peak performance and a personal planning framework for creating desired outcomes. Overworked and Overwhelmed offers practical insights for any professional who feels like his or her RPMs are maxed out in the red zone. Eblin makes his practice of mindfulness simple to offer actionable hope for today’s overworked and overwhelmed professional.

 

the reciprocity advantage

by Bob Johansen and Karl Ronn

The Reciprocity Advantage by Bob Johansen and Karl Ronn

Leading forecaster Bob Johansen and business developer Karl Ronn share a model for creating new growth for your business using the underutilized resources you already own that you can share with others. They describe a model for collaborating to do what you can’t do alone. The Reciprocity Advantage shows readers how to leverage new forces like cloud-served supercomputing into scalable and profitable growth for your organization.

 

rookie smarts

by Liz Wiseman

Rookie Smarts by Liz Wiseman

In a rapidly changing world, constant learning is more valuable than experience or mastery. Leadership expert Liz Wiseman explains how to reclaim and cultivate the curious, flexible, youthful mindset of a rookie in order to keep up with what’s needed from employees. In Rookie Smarts, Wiseman details the four modes of the rookie mindset that lead to success.

Let’s Stop Meeting Like This – Please!

What would happen if you made all of your meetings voluntary? Eric Lindblad, vice president and general manager of Boeing’s 747 program did just that. There are no mandatory meetings on Eric’s watch. He wanted people to be there not because of threats or politics but because they wanted to be there.

You may be like Eric, feeling that too many of the meetings you lead are time-wasting, energy-sapping affairs. Most may seem like useless gatherings endured at the expense of your “real work” – meetings that sabotage your organization’s goals and product while wasting human capital.

If this is the case then you’ll want to sign up for our upcoming webinar with Dick and Emily Axelrod. They have the answers for those of us who are frustrated with our present meeting strategy. In this webinar you’ll learn how to:

• Transform meetings into productive work experiences.
• Identify the habits that work for and against energy-producing, time-valued meetings.
• Identify the critical choices that meeting designers, leaders, and contributors make that transform meetings.
• Create a meeting environment where everyone puts their paddle in the water.

Join us on December 16th for Tools to Save Time and Get Things Done and get a head start on reworking your meeting strategy for the New Year. You’ll be happy you joined us when you’re meetings become productive again.

Book Review: Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does

If you feel that your efforts to motivate employees are falling short, you are not alone. Senior consulting partner for the Ken Blanchard Companies, Susan Fowler, reveals that motivating people doesn’t work because they are already motivated in Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does. Fowler helps leaders understand what they can do to go beyond traditional styles of motivation to help people not only be more productive and engaged but to bring a sense of purpose to their work. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

“You can use all your power attempting to motivate people, but it won’t work if you want them to experience an optimal motivational outlook. Shifting to an optimal motivational outlook is something people can do only for themselves,” writes Fowler. She presents a tested model and course of action that will help leaders guide their employees toward the type of motivation that will increase productivity and engagement. Her Optimal Motivation process shows leaders how to help people meet their needs for autonomy, relatedness and competence for long-lasting motivation. Of the three, relatedness is about our need to feel like we are contributing to something greater than ourselves. This is important for leaders to help their employees feel like all their work matters to the organization as a whole.

Fowler concludes her profound thoughts on motivation by re-thinking five beliefs, which she states erode workplace motivation. These eroding beliefs include: It’s Not Personal; It’s Just Business, The Purpose of Business Is to Make Money, Leaders Are in a Position of Power, The Only Thing That Really Matters Is Results, and If You Cannot Measure It, It Doesn’t Matter. As a leader, you can activate optimal motivation for yourself to become a role model for others in your organization with the insights in Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does.

Don’t Be Blind-Sided in a Crisis

If your company or community was facing a major crisis, who would you want to coach you through it? Someone with experience in dealing with crises of course. How about someone like Bruce Blythe?

Blythe and Crisis Management Institute offered onsite crisis consultations to more than 200 companies in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks, as well as for the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, Hurricanes Andrew and Katrina in 1992 and 2005, corporate and commercial air crashes, an Ecuadorian jungle rescue of kidnap and ransom hostages 2001,a Coca Cola truck/bus crash in Texas that killed 23 school children in 1989, earthquakes in Los Angeles and San Francisco, and multiple workplace shootings.

With that kind of experience, we just had to invite him to share with our subscribers how they can deal effectively with the crises that come up around them. Here is what Bruce promises to provide during our 60 minute webinar: A Manager’s Guide to Crisis Leadership.

• Crisis Response – Blythe places you in a simulation as an unprepared manager blindsided by an active shooter loose in your building.
• Crisis Preparedness – Blythe then guides you and your teams to analyze foreseeable risks, evaluate existing controls, add new ones, test and re-evaluate a realistic Plan.
• Crisis Leadership – Blythe cites examples/case studies to demonstrate what top-notch leaders would say and do during and after a disaster.
• Quick responses with detailed checklists for managing 9 major incidents.
• How to address victim’s families – dos and don’ts for communicating tragic news with empathy and dignity in person and through representatives.
• How to support employees in returning to work and productivity after a disaster or workplace violence.

So gather your team together on December 2nd at 12:00 pm ET and plan a discussion time after the webinar. Subscribers attend for free, but even if you pay the $49 registration fee that’s a great deal for your whole staff to get crisis management training. Bruce will also be taking time at the end of the session to answer your questions.

The Lenovo Way

MERGING EAST AND WEST IN A GLOBAL BRAND

In The Lenovo Way, Gina Qiao, Senior Vice President of Global HR, and Yolanda Conyers, Lenovo’s Vice President of Global HR Operations and Chief Diversity  Officer, tell the incredible story of the world’s number one PC maker, Lenovo. Originally called Legend, Lenovo was some 15 years ago a little-known (outside of China) computer company started by a survivor of Mao’s Cultural Revolution. That Liu Chuanzhi was able to build a computer company in China that could compete with the likes of Dell and Apple was already a success story; that his company, now renamed Lenovo, would be able to successfully acquire in 2005 the iconic IBM PC business, which was actually four times the size of Lenovo, was a feat of perhaps unprecedented business skill and daring.

Within Lenovo, the acquisition was described as the snake eating the elephant. Not surprisingly, the digestion of said elephant was a tumultuous, often frustrating process, chronicled in The Lenovo Way by two of its key players.

Gina and Yolanda

The experiences of Gina Qiao and Yolanda Conyers in many ways reflect the frustrations of the post-acquisition experience for both the Chinese and the non-Chinese managers and employees of the new behemoth.

When English was announced as the official language of the new company, Gina knew exactly three words of English: “hello,” “goodbye” and “thank you.” Arriving at the headquarters of the American firm her company had just acquired, she was refused entry by the gatekeeper, who told her she had to do better than say she had “a meeting with Peter.”

In one important strategy brainstorming session, Gina was silent in response to a proposal from her American counterpart because she disagreed but did not want to be disrespectful. The American counterpart took her silence for approval and pushed through the proposal. Gina eventually learned to use the phrase “I am not comfortable” to communicate her respectful concerns.

Yolanda soon discovered that her Chinese colleagues were seething over what they saw as her overly aggressive, straightforward style. Eventually, Gina would sit her down and give her an extensive list of pointers about what not to do. Examples: no group emails; don’t say you disagree, which shows disrespect; take the time to build individual relationships; wear a jacket to work — dress can also be misinterpreted as a sign of disrespect. Eventually, Gina would move to the U.S., and Yolanda would eventually move to China, enhancing their understanding of other cultures.

The integration challenge was heightened by the fact that there were what the authors call “three rivers,” referring to the three different corporate backgrounds of Lenovo’s executives: Lenovo, IBM and Dell (a number of key people brought in after the merger, including the new CEO of Lenovo, Bill Amelio, as well as Yolanda Conyers, came from Dell).The Lenovo veterans were seen as “unyielding and unwilling to communicate” by others; the IBMers were seen as “slow-moving and entitled”; while the Dell hires were seen as “aggressive and arrogant.” With vastly different languages, national cultures and corporate cultures to overcome, the fact that the new Lenovo not only survived but thrives is a testament to its leaders, including the authors of the book.

The Lenovo Story

In some ways, The Lenovo Way is misnamed. There is, indeed, a Lenovo Way, which consists of four Ps (plan before you pledge, perform as promised, prioritize the company first, and practice improving every day) and Lenovo’s Protect and Attack strategy, which is focused on protecting and exploiting current advantages while always looking for new growth areas. And given Lenovo’s global success, after some difficult post-acquisition years, its strategies for success in the age of globalization should be carefully heeded. However, it is the successful integration of the Chinese and Western cultures that is truly at the heart of this book — and its greatest lesson.

The one drawback to the book is that the voices of Gina Qiao and Yolanda Conyers are lost, since the text refers to them in the third person. Nevertheless, these two incredible women from opposite sides of the world will encourage everyone to believe that the most insurmountable cross-cultural challenges can be overcome with patience and an open mind.