Don’t miss our next FREE webinar!

How to Unleash Millennials in the Workplace [FREE EVENT]

Date: Thursday, July 28
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Jason Forrest

Register for FREE 

The millennial generation is becoming the dominate population inside of corporations. The problem is, companies are struggling on how to maximize their productivity.

In this FREE webinar, How to Unleash Millennials in the Workplace, Jason Forrest will share with us how sales managers can help millennials reach their full potential by developing them into the best versions of themselves.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to increase retention of millennials.
  • How to drive profitability through millennials with coaching.
  • The management style needed to bring out the best in millennials.

How to Maximize Engagement in Today’s Workforce

WhatMillennialsWantFromWorkMillennials have been burdened with a reputation as spoiled, lazy and entitled, but the reality behind the stereotype is far richer and more complex. Who are Millennials, what do they really want, and what can you do about it? Based on fieldwork and survey data from global research, What Millennials Want from Work paints a comprehensive, scientifically accurate picture of what really motivates Millennials around the world. Learn how to engage Millennials by improving workplace flexibility, because Millennials don’t separate life and work; providing adequate support and feedback, because Millennials like to learn and grow; coaching, not micromanaging, because Millennials value autonomy; designing competitive salary structures, because Millennials know what’s up; and providing opportunities to contribute to society, because Millennials care about doing good. In this essential book, Jennifer J. Deal and Alec Levenson explain who Millennials really are, and offer practical advice to help those who manage, lead, and work with Millennials, to improve teamwork, increase productivity, strengthen organizational culture and build a robust talent pipeline.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• Common misconceptions and realities about Millennials in the workplace.
• How Millennials can be both entitled and hardworking.
• The economic and social conditions that motivate and challenge Millennials at work.
• Practical tips for attracting, engaging and retaining Millennials.
• Important trends to help organizations plan for the future.

What Makes Millennials Good Leaders

It’s dangerous to paint entire generations with the same brush; some tendencies or narratives can quickly become exaggerated. On the subject of Millennials and leadership, two conflicting stories often emerge: the first, that Millennials want a fast track to leadership roles without being willing to pay their dues; the second, that Millennials are not willing to accept the sacrifices — working long hours at the expense of family — expected of leaders.

A recent global study by France’s INSEAD shows that some of these narratives are misleading. According to the study, based on interviews with thousands of Millennials in 43 countries, 70 percent of the Millennials considered becoming a leader “important” or “very important,” and nearly 64 percent said they were willing to work longer hours and have more stress for the opportunities to be leaders. While past studies and books might focus on Millennials in their role as future leaders, a new book declares that the future has arrived. Millennials Who Manage: How to Overcome Workplace Perceptions and Become a Great Leader, by Chip Espinoza and Joel Schwarzbart, is written for and not about Millennial leaders and managers. Step by step, the authors lay out the challenges and best practices for Millennial managers already in leadership positions or preparing for the next step. The authors use their own surveys and research as sources for their prescriptions.

Because of their youth, Millennial managers immediately face unique challenges…

 

To learn what these specific challenges are, sign up for our FREE Executive Book Alert newsletter today!

 

Age Profiling in the Workplace

In my blog post back on April 11th, I wrote about the need for companies to develop a work ethic among Generation Y employees as part of my coverage of our webinar with Eric Chester. But as I was writing, I couldn’t help but think of several young adults I know who have a very strong work ethic. Is it fair to toss them in with the rest of Gen Y?

Over the past decade a host of books have been published on the differences between the generations of workers, with labels like Baby Boomers, Gen X, Gen Y, Millennials and so on. As you read books like The 2020 Workplace, Bridging the Boomer-Xer Gap, Generations at Work and similar titles, the authors use the differences between the generations to talk about their skills and weaknesses as groups, and how to take advantage of the skills and overcome the weaknesses.

These are very helpful books in dealing with the big picture of the mixed bag which is our employee pool. These authors answer the important question of how we make the most of each generation’s abilities and also smooth over the wrinkles that appear as these generations mix in the workplace.

But at the same time we must recognize that not every individual of a certain age-range is going to be the same as their peers, and that there is a great overlap between these generations. Also, other factors come to bear in what makes people different including other demographic factors and upbringing.

Mary Anne Osborne, in a guest blog for Sage HR, warns us of the risks of age profiling. She states “But of key concern here is not letting externally perceived notions of generational tendencies cloud judgment of character.” The danger of making assumptions about a person based solely on their generational group can lead to costly mistakes in hiring and training.

Osborne give the example of Generation Y, which some characterize as needy, disloyal and self-entitled. And yet this generation has brought us Groupon, Facebook, Tumblr and foursquare.

The key lesson here is to make use of what we know about the general characteristics of each generation while always giving each individual the benefit of the doubt. The old adage “don’t judge a book by its cover” applies here. Don’t judge a person by their “generational cover” – give them a chance to show their true merits.