New Executive Summary: MOVE by Patty Azzarello

Move-thumbToo many new initiatives lose drive and direction before they finish. At the beginning, when a team first commits to implementing a new strategy, there is a great energy and enthusiasm — driven by the allure of the end goal. But then comes the long, dangerous part in “The Middle,” where everything needs to get done, obstacles inevitably spring up, and people feel a strong temptation to revert to the old ways. MOVE explains how to keep your team focused, motivated and resilient enough to push through the unavoidable, chronic challenges that derail most change initiatives. Some of the most recognizable brands in the world use the MOVE methodology to ensure their change strategies don’t stall. Business transformation expert Patty Azzarello explains the four components of a prosperous business transformation and exactly what it takes to keep everyone moving the new strategy forward. The MOVE Model will help you make sure that everyone stays engaged, maintains momentum, and that your initiatives succeed.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:

• The key elements in an execution plan that guarantee accountability and momentum.
• Empowering tools for transforming the team you have into the team you need.
• A powerful new way to think about leading and communicating to genuinely engage people throughout the implementation.
• Using communication to produce results and build trust

Developing a High-Performing Team That Delivers Results

Join us for our next Soundview Live webinar – tomorrow!

Date: Thursday, August 4
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Mario Moussa

Click here to register

In order to build a high-performing team that delivers results, a deceptively simple philosophy comes to mind: set a direction, try to stay on track, and make adjustments when necessary. Easy to do? Hardly–especially when the typical workday is time-crunched, stressful, and deadline-driven.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Developing a High-Performing Team that Delivers Results, Mario Moussa presents us with a how-to guide that offers the pragmatic advice you need to help you gain buy-in for shared objectives, assign roles to the right people, and establish norms for effective collaboration.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How to align every member of your team behind a motivating vision
  • How to make team meetings efficient and productive
  • How to close the gap between stated goals and actual behaviors

How to Maximize Engagement in Today’s Workforce

WhatMillennialsWantFromWorkMillennials have been burdened with a reputation as spoiled, lazy and entitled, but the reality behind the stereotype is far richer and more complex. Who are Millennials, what do they really want, and what can you do about it? Based on fieldwork and survey data from global research, What Millennials Want from Work paints a comprehensive, scientifically accurate picture of what really motivates Millennials around the world. Learn how to engage Millennials by improving workplace flexibility, because Millennials don’t separate life and work; providing adequate support and feedback, because Millennials like to learn and grow; coaching, not micromanaging, because Millennials value autonomy; designing competitive salary structures, because Millennials know what’s up; and providing opportunities to contribute to society, because Millennials care about doing good. In this essential book, Jennifer J. Deal and Alec Levenson explain who Millennials really are, and offer practical advice to help those who manage, lead, and work with Millennials, to improve teamwork, increase productivity, strengthen organizational culture and build a robust talent pipeline.

IN THIS SUMMARY, YOU WILL LEARN:
• Common misconceptions and realities about Millennials in the workplace.
• How Millennials can be both entitled and hardworking.
• The economic and social conditions that motivate and challenge Millennials at work.
• Practical tips for attracting, engaging and retaining Millennials.
• Important trends to help organizations plan for the future.

FREE WEBINAR: Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work featuring Susan Fowler

Join us for this FREE webinar!

Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work
Date: Thursday, April 14th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Susan Fowler

Register today and get a FREE summary of Susan Fowler’s book, Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work…And What Does

If you are being held accountable for motivating people, hear this: Motivating people doesn’t work. According to researcher and bestselling author, Susan Fowler, it is time you consider trading in outdated methods of motivation for leadership practices based on the compelling science of motivation.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work, Susan Fowler lays out a globally tested model, course of action, and alternative approach to replace outdated methods of motivation. Learn how you can facilitate people’s shift to the type of motivation that promotes sustainable performance, high-quality productivity, long-term employee engagement, and flourishing.

What You’ll Learn:

  • The role motivation plays in employee engagement (or disengagement)
  • Six reasons people are motivated—and why some are optimal (leading to engaged employees) and others are suboptimal (leading to disengagement)
  • A cutting-edge leadership practice that facilitates people’s optimal motivation

 

Register today and get a FREE summary of Susan Fowler’s book, Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work…And What Does

Review: Above the Line by Urban Meyer

At the end of the 2010 football season, University of Florida football coach Urban Meyer was at the top of his game. In only six seasons at Florida, he had already won two championships. And more championships were predicted.

Then Meyer stunned the college football world by announcing that he was stepping down as coach for personal reasons — a catch-all reason given by those in positions of authority looking for a discreet escape hatch. However, the catch-all phrase was right on target for Meyer that year. He was indeed leaving the program for personal reasons. His personal health. His personal relationships. His personal priorities.

In 2012, Urban Meyer returned to coaching at Ohio State University, the team for whom he had rooted as a boy growing up in Ashtabula, Ohio. He had not lost his desire to win, the competitive drive that had been instilled in him by his supportive but no-holds-barred father. (His father rewarded his son with a special dinner when, as a boy, Meyer got into his first fight, protecting his sister.) Meyer was also as intense as he had always been about his expectations of hard work and commitment to the team. There was, however, a new focus on life balance and a greater sense of priority…..

How to Motivate Your Employees

Satisfy Their Psychological Needs
Human thriving in the workplace is a dynamic potential that requires nurturing. The workplace either facilitates, fosters and enables our flourishing, or it disrupts, thwarts and impedes it. In fact, conventional motivational practices have undermined more often than they’ve encouraged our human potential, according to Susan Fowler in Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does.

Give Their Work Meaning
When meaning in our work is absent, we tend to disengage at some level. The provision of meaning is the solution for disengagement. When work has meaning, it drives the expenditure and investment of discretionary energy on a physical, cognitive and emotional level, Scott Mautz points out in Make It Matter. It’s the feeling that you matter and are making a difference; your engagement is paying off.

Provide Fulfilling Work
One of the most common marching orders for new leaders is to address a situation that is being presented as a workforce motivation problem, according to Jacob Stoller in The Lean CEO. Conventional wisdom in the early 1900s was that the manager-worker relationship was inherently adversarial and that the key weapons for ensuring a productive workforce were pay and threats. Psychological research since that time has shown that human motivation is far more complex than that.

Create a Winning Environment
The key to keep motivating people to perform at their best is to build self-esteem (which leads to self-confidence and self-respect) in each person who reports to you, Brian Tracy points out in Full Engagement! Each person has unlimited potential that the individual can bring to bear on the job, to do that job better and faster. People have huge reservoirs of creativity that can be unleashed to solve problems, overcome obstacles and achieve business goals.

 

To learn more about motivating your employees, subscribe to our Executive Edge newsletter and get the skills you need to get ahead.

Our Recent Choices for Best Business Books of 2015

This month our summaries are all about speed. Persuasion Equation talks about ways to speed up the negotiation process, The Attacker’s Advantage explores ways to detect market changes in advance in order to move more quickly to take advantage, and our bonus summary F.I.R.E. presents ways to accelerate innovation.

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Persuasion Equation

The Subtle Science of Getting Your Way

by Mark Rodgers

This insightful guide by Mark Rodgers reveals what drives decisions and introduces the persuasion equation –– a powerful combination of factors proven to speed agreement. Learn how to set your persuasion priorities and perfect the five-step persuasion process in order to gain buy-in from those around you.

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The Attacker’s Advantage

Turning Uncertainty into Breakthrough Opportunities

by Ram Charan

Ram Charan provides proven tools to help leaders embrace uncertainty and develop the skills to be better prepared to lead. The attacker’s advantage is the perceptual acuity to detect ahead of others forces that could radically reshape a market space so you can position your business to make the next move first.

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F.I.R.E.

How Fast, Inexpensive, Restrained and Elegant Methods Ignite Innovation

by Dan Ward

Dan Ward introduces the FIRE method in which strategies are built for speed and designs are streamlined, all at less cost. You’ll learn that the project leaders who embrace speed, thrift, simplicity and restraint tend to deliver affordable equipment that is available when it’s needed and effective when it’s used.

If you’re a Soundview subscriber, check out your new titles in your online library today. And if not, click on a title to purchase it; or perhaps now is the time to Subscribe and get these great titles and much more to strengthen your leader skills.

What Could You Learn From Our Latest Summaries?

Our September summaries are all about what is best for employees. Whether it’s corporate education, empowering employees through lean practices, or developing employee character, this set of summaries offers a wealth of information to strengthen your company.

 

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Learning to Succeed

Rethinking Corporate Education in a World of Unrelenting Change

by Jason Wingard
Corporate learning expert Jason Wingard proposes that to keep ahead of the competition, organizations should shift to embracing learning across the ranks and become dynamic learning organizations. With a dedication to learning initiatives, a company will be better equipped to make the decisions that will ensure its future.
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The Lean CEO

Leading the Way to World-Class Excellence

by Jacob Stoller
Many companies and CEOs are finding that to do more with less, that they can find solutions in Lean management techniques to deliver sustainable financial results, empower and motivate employees, break down internal silos and build solid partnerships with customers and suppliers. Journalist and facilitator Jacob Stoller explains the methodology by including in-depth interviews with CEOs who have established Lean as a corporate-wide management system.
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The Good Ones

Ten Crucial Qualities of High-Character Employees

by Bruce Weinstein
Ethics expert Bruce Weinstein presents 10 crucial qualities associated with high-character employees that can enhance employee satisfaction, client relationships and the bottom line. Character refers to the most important qualities that define a person’s identity and it is revealed not by words but by actions. The qualities are honesty, accountability, care, courage, fairness, gratitude, humility, loyalty, patience and presence.

If you’re a Soundview subscriber, check out your new titles in your online library today. And if not, click on a title to purchase it; or perhaps now is the time to Subscribe and get these great titles and much more to strengthen your leader skills.

50 Ways to Enhance your Presence and Impact at Work

Our guest blogger today is Simon Tyler, author of The Impact Code.

Much has been written about leadership and impact. Corporate impact, specifically, is a term which seems to have a lot of style, but often very little substance. You are advised to change your appearance, use the right body language and so on.

But here’s the crux: without wisdom, without purpose and authentic intention, irrespective of dramatic style upgrades, your impact is rendered impotent and empty. True leaders and innovators – Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther-King, Winston Churchill, Steve Jobs – are considered ‘great’ due to their passion, and their belief in their purpose. People wanted to follow them and their ideas.

Without a sense of what motivates and inspires you, a new suit or different haircut will do little to improve your leadership potential. The Impact Code challenges you from the outset to examine your purpose as the first step towards creating a powerful positive impact on the world and those around you.

How often have you asked yourself:

“What am I passionate about?”

“What do I stand for?”

“What would I like people to say about me, and what I have done?”

… and actually written down your immediate responses?

Your current leadership impact is revealed in the answers to these core questions. It tells a story to those around you, making a statement about who you are and how you go about your journey. It’s about how you create lasting and meaningful impact.

In my role as coach and mentor, I observe senior managers and directors, every one of them leaders, in that they have willing followers, but only a few demonstrating executive presence.

I have identified five interlinked channels for executive presence. The consistency with which it is delivered, makes the impact more potent.

In The Impact Code I refer to these as The Five Aspects of Leadership Impact, and I will discuss them at the Soundview Live webinar on August 20th.

  1. Visual impact
  2. Presence
  3. Connection
  4. Verbal impact
  5. Your leadership footprint

In practice, all five aspects are in play much of the time. Becoming mindful of how you use the aspects of impact prepares you to enhance both the strength and consistency of your message.

During the webinar I will discuss a leader’s impact journey. Powerful, authentic leadership can be identified by four escalating outcomes:

Attraction – People are attracted to you and to your ideas. They may, or may not, be able to explain why, but they gravitate towards you in a room and are eager to hear what you have to say.

Appetite – Your connection with individuals amplifies their initial attraction; they are now actively aware of their interest in your ideas, your team, your company, and they want more.

Advocacy – People are deeply and passionately aware of your ideas and motivated to advocate them to others – they support your cause verbally, they discuss it with peers, creating a buzz around you and your vision.

Action – Your passion and leadership create a palpable and obvious response in others. They take new, inspired action, and do something directly as a result of their involvement with you. You create change through the actions of others. Your impact is spreading more widely and is not restricted to the people you meet in person.

During the webinar I will help you notice positive and impactful perceptions of yourself and your work, not only in a business setting, but in other areas of life too. Heightening your self-awareness, becoming more deliberate, will enhance your impact and accelerate the pace of the change and also bring many of the material, emotional and spiritual rewards you seek.

Join us on August 20th for our webinar with Simon Tyler: 50 Ways to Enhance Your Presence and Impact at Work.

Whoever Tells the Best Story Wins

EVERYONE CAN BE A GOOD STORYTELLER

Anyone who has read Steven Levitt’s phenomenal bestseller Freakonomics remembers the advice that his father gave him when Levitt, an economist with suspect mathematical skills, wondered about his professional future as an economist. The advice: Find a niche. The advice itself is not the memorable part, of course; it is the story that accompanied it. Levitt recalls that his father explained how he, too, was not the genius of his class and decided that his best bet was to find an under-filled niche that the stars of medical school would ignore. Thus, Levitt explains, his father developed an expertise in intestinal gas and eventually became known as the King of Farts.

Freakonomics is filled with evocative, funny and illuminating stories, which explains, according to Annette Simmons, author of Whoever Tells the Best Story Wins, why it was so successful. Facts are important, she writes, but they often fail to connect with those who hear them. To truly be informative and persuasive, you need good stories — especially personal stories.

Another major advantage of stories is that they effectively convey experiences. “Experience changes minds, alters decisions and creates cohesive action,” Simmons writes. The best way for investors to understand the impact of poor working conditions in the company’s developing world factories, for example, is to walk through a sweatshop. In most cases, however, using the tool of personal experience to influence others is not feasible. A good story, if told with enough feeling and detail, can act as a vicarious experience, plunging the listener into the situation.

Six Stories to Tell

Many people believe that they are not good storytellers, when in fact, Simmons points out, every one of us tells stories all the time. We may not realize, however, that when describing a funny moment of forgetfulness or venting about a frustrating customer-service experience, we are telling a story. Of course, not all stories are appropriate for influencing people. Venting makes us feel good but is hardly a teaching moment.

Simmons identifies the six types of stories that, she writes, “lead to influence, imagination, and innovation”:

Who-I-Am Stories. People won’t trust you if you don’t get personal. “Reveal who you are as a person,” Simmons writes.

Why-I-Am-Here Stories. Use stories to explain your agenda and to be authentic. Explain what’s in it for you.

Teaching Stories. Telling a story that creates a shared experience will be more motivating than just giving someone advice.

Vision Stories. Describe, through a detailed story, your vision of the future.

Value-in-Action Stories. Use stories to show a value in action. Hypothetical situations will sound contrived. A true story will make a compelling case for that value.

I-Know-What-You-Are-Thinking Stories. Use a story to show your listener that you are already aware of their unspoken objections or suspicions — and that you have an answer.

Finding the Right Stories

One of the challenges to becoming a good storyteller is finding the right stories. Simmons offers four buckets of story sources from which storytellers can draw: a time you shined, a time you blew it (embarrassing stories build trust); a story about a mentor (which shows humility and gratitude); a story from a book, movie or current event (that exemplifies the core message).

Simmons devotes a chapter to each of the six types of stories. In each chapter, she assigns the reader a general situation. In the chapter about teaching stories, for example, she asks the reader to imagine a pet peeve concerning a job poorly done. The assignment is to tell a non-judgmental story to teach the person to do a better job.

In the final section of this practical how-to book, Simmons helps the reader hone the craft of storytelling. She covers areas such as how to add sensory details that make the story experiential, the importance of brevity and the power of multiple points of view.

In an information-age world that seems enamored with the mass processing of “Big Data,” Whoever Tells the Best Story Wins offers the refreshing perspective that the most traditional of all types of communication — the oral history — is also the most effective tool for influencing and leading people.