Join Us for a Webinar on 5/24: How to Manage Your Time and Accomplish Goals

How to Manage Your Time and Accomplish Goals
Date: Tuesday, May 24th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Chris Bailey

Register Today!

Productivity affects all of us; whether it be at home or in the office, there always seems to be a struggle to make time for all of life’s essential tasks.

In this Soundview Live webinar, How to Manage Your Time and Accomplish Goals, Chris Bailey takes us on his year-long journey to productivity. Through self-experimentation, Bailey offers counterintuitive insights on how to better-manage your time, attention and energy in order to accomplish more and not lose sight of the more meaningful things in life.

What You’ll Learn:

  • how to slow down to work more deliberately
  • how to shrink the unimportant and strive for imperfection
  • how to schedule less time for important tasks
  • the 20 second rule to distract yourself from the inevitable distractions
  • the concept of productive procrastination

Join Us for a FREE webinar with Best-Selling Author and Business Leader, Patrick Lencioni

lencioniRegistration is now open for the FREE Patrick Lencioni webinar “How to Be the Ideal Team Player” presented by Soundview on Thursday, May 5th at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

Register today and get a FREE summary of Lencioni’s book, The Ideal Team Player.

Whether you’re a leader trying to create a culture around teamwork, a staffing professional looking to hire real team players, or a team player wanting to improve yourself, this webinar offers applicable tips for your career.

In this FREE Soundview Live webinar, How to Be the Ideal Team Player, Patrick Lencioni uses a fable to dissect the ins and outs of an ideal team player. Lencioni tells the story of Jeff Shanley, a leader desperate to save his uncle’s company by restoring its cultural commitment to teamwork. Jeff must crack the code on the virtues that real team players possess, and then build a culture of hiring and development around those virtues.

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Register Here:
http://www.summary.com/free-webinar/lencioni
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You Will Learn:

  • The three indispensable virtues of an ideal team player
  • A practical framework and actionable tools for identifying, hiring, and developing ideal team players
  • How to improve your ability to lead and be an active team player

About the Speaker:

Patrick Lencioni is founder and president of The Table Group, a firm dedicated to helping leaders improve their organizations’ health since 1997. His principles have been embraced by leaders around the world and adopted by organizations of virtually every kind including multinational corporations, entrepreneurial ventures, professional sports teams, the military, nonprofits, schools, and churches.

Lencioni is the author of ten business books with over three million copies sold worldwide. His work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Bloomberg Businessweek, and USA Today.

Join us for our next Soundview Live webinar!

Critical Conversations: Ensuring Success without Sacrificing Sanity
Date: Wednesday, April 27th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Cornelia Gamlem & Barbara Mitchell
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Click here to register!

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In this Soundview Live webinar, Critical Conversations: Ensuring Success without Sacrificing Sanity, Barbara Mitchell and Cornelia Gamlem will offer guidance to employees, managers at all levels, and business owners communicate effectively to achieve a tension-free workplace.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Set and manage expectations
  • Identify changes in the workplace and the workforce
  • Create more options to solve conflicts
  • Recognize your personal conflict style, and why it is important
  • Effectively handle disruptive behavior

Join Best-Selling Author Tim Sanders for an Interactive Webinar

IF YOU GO:
The Secret Weapon to Sales Success
Date: Tuesday, March 22nd
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Tim Sanders

Click here to register

In this Soundview Live webinar, The Secret Weapon to Sales Success, Tim Sanders introduces “dealstorming,” a term for a structured, scalable, repeatable process that can break through any sales deadlock. This “Swiss Army knife for today’s toughest sales challenges” promises to fix the broken parts of the brainstorming process and reinvigorate account management for today’s increasingly complicated sales environment.

What You’ll Learn:

  • Utilize the seven-step Dealstorming process to gain positive results
  • Drive sales innovation by combining the wisdom and creativity of everyone who has a stake in the sale.
  • Collaborate with people from non-sales areas of your company, making it easier for them to own the execution and delivery after the deal is done.
  • Apply strategies that will lead to game-changing deals and long-term B2B relationships.

 

How to Prevent Bullying in the Workplace

IF YOU GO: 
Bullying in the Workplace
Date: Wednesday, January 20th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Andrew Faas

Bullying in the workplace destroys careers, lives, family units, organizations, and communities. Many organizational cultures condone and even encourage bullying. Most people who are targeted and or are bystanders do not report for fear of retaliation. Amazingly, many who are targeted are unaware that what they are going through is bullying.

In this Soundview Live webinar, Bullying in the Workplace, author Andrew Faas provides comprehensive and provocative insight into the dynamics, impacts, and costs of bullying in the workplace and answers how it can be prevented and stopped. Faas asserts that everyone has a role to play and challenges the reader to take action.

You Will Learn:

  • What culture has to do with bullying.
  • About the dynamics of bullying.
  • How to effectively deal with bullying.
  • Important advice for the bullied and the bully.

Register today for this informative webinar!

 

All webinars are FREE for our subscribers! Not a Soundview member? Sign up today!

 

Delivering World-Class Customer Service

IF YOU GO:
Delivering World-Class Customer Service
Date:
Thursday, January 7th
Time: 12:00 PM ET
Speaker: Joseph Michelli

Why are Mercedes-Benz customers so loyal and passionate?  Because the people at Mercedes-Benz are Driven to Delight.

 

In this upcoming Soundview Live webinar, Delivering World-Class Customer Service, Joseph Michelli reveals how Mercedes-Benz USA launched a multi-year program to elevate their customer experience–even though their product was already “best in class,” how they activated people, improved processes, and deployed technology to emotionally engage customers, and how the Mercedes-Benz approach can jump-start any customer-driven business―by accelerating your commitment to the customer experience.

You’ll Learn How To:

  • Create a compelling vision for exceptional customer experiences.
  • Identify the ever changing wants, needs, and desires of your customer segments.
  • Map out your key customer journeys and high value contact points.
  • Effectively evaluate customer perceptions throughout their journey with you.
  • Resolve customer needs swiftly and constantly improve your delivery processes.
  • Link rewards and recognition to customer experience excellence throughout your organization.

 

Did we mention- these webinars are free for our subscribers?
Not a Soundview subscriber yet? Sign up today!

 

No women? Leaky Pipeline? Here’s how to fix it.

Today’s guest blogger is Jodi Detjen, Managing Partner at Orange Grove Consulting, Professor of the Practice in Management at Suffolk University in Boston, MA and co-author of The Orange Line:

Microsoft announced on November 23 that the percentage of women decreased by almost 2.5% since last year.  The reason? Changes in their workplace meant that women – who predominated on the production line – were laid off.  The real reason?  Too many women at the bottom and too few at the top:  The leaky pipeline.

Too often excuses about the leaky pipeline are rationalized as women’s choices or insufficient talent availability.  In fact, there are two key reasons why the pipeline continues to drip.

Reason #1 is entrenched organizational bias that limits decision makers’ ability to see alternatives.  Decision makers fall into the trap of promoting people that look and act just like me rather than identifying candidates outside the traditional path.  Managers make decisions for women rather than asking them (e.g. she won’t want to do that international trip; she has young kids at home). Women hear comments like: she shouldn’t present; it’s an audience of all men and they will want to hear a man speak. It also limits the way work is defined such that work becomes focused on how many hours we can extract from employees rather than cultivating ideas and innovation.

Reason #2 is more hidden and less identified.  These are the hidden assumptions women make about themselves that limit their career ambitions.  These too show up as rationalizations: I can’t go on that international trip; who will take care of the kids? I can’t ask my husband. Or as limited opportunities:  I don’t want that promotion.  I’ve never done that before.  I’m not qualified.  I’ll try in a few years.  After a while, these hidden assumptions start to become fact and become unconscious.

The problem with unconscious bias is that we don’t see it.  The problem with raising consciousness is we don’t know what to do about it.  The way to manage both reasons is to face the bias head on and then shift our mindset about it.  That is, we notice the bias, we look at the impact, then we reframe how we think about it.  Instead of she shouldn’t present, we ask, who’s the most competent and compelling speaker for this audience?  Instead of I don’t want that promotion we think, that promotion will help me grow.  I will learn and be able to contribute more. I will figure out the details as I go.

Changing our mindset changes everything.  We move from a limited, contracted world-view to one with significantly more options.  We have choices.  We can experiment.  And the end result?  The pipeline stops leaking.  Working with only one reason won’t work.  The bias is in both places.  The solution isn’t easy but it also isn’t impossible.  We simply reframe.

detjen
Jodi Detjen
Jodi@orangegroveconsulting.com
@jodidetjen

For more information on overcoming biases in the workplace, join Jodi Detjen for our upcoming Soundview Live webinar, Overcoming the Biases that Can Limit Women’s Careers on Tuesday, December 8th.

 

The Top Soundview Live Webinars of 2015

In 2015 we have hosted 60 Soundview Live webinars with top business authors and leaders. So I went back to see which were our most popular. You may be surprised by those that made the list – or perhaps not.

Kory Kogon – The Path to Extraordinary Productivity: In this Soundview Live webinar Kory Kogon offers powerful insights drawn from the latest neuroscience and decades of experience and research in the time-management field to help you master your attention and energy management through five fundamental choices that will increase your ability to achieve what matters most to you.

Scott Eblin – Mindfulness Basics to Thrive in a 24/7 World: In this Soundview Live webinar Scott Eblin offers practical insights for the executive, manager or professional who feels like their RPM is maxed out in the red zone. By making the concepts and practices of mindfulness simple, practical and applicable, this event offers actionable hope for today’s overworked and overwhelmed professional.

Daniel Weiser – How to Become an Expert Negotiator: You may be a high-ranking CEO or a first day salesman, a service provider or self-employed. If you face encounters with your partners, clients, suppliers or employees, in which you want them to think differently at the end of the meeting and actually do what you want – this webinar is for YOU. The objective of this Soundview Live webinar with Daniel Weiser is to improve your negotiation skills and to move you one step closer to closing your deal.

Steve Shallenberger – How the BEST Leaders Ignite Energy and Fuel High Performance: In this Soundview Live webinar Steve Shallenberger will help you leverage the 12 principles that propel teams and organizations to the top! These tools and processes drive the kind of innovation that turns good teams and companies into industry leaders – all while living a well-balanced personal life. Steve will provide advice, tools and examples for turning your thoughts into action and bringing out the best in your teams and employees!

Daymond John – The Power of Branding: In this Soundview Live webinar Daymond John tells how four ordinary guys from Queens, New York, rose from street corners to corner offices and became the greatest trendsetters of our generation. He lays it all out on the line- his secrets to success, his triumphs, and his utter failures- to show what it takes to harness and display the power that resides in us all.

Marshall Goldsmith – How to Create Behavior Change that Lasts: In this powerful Soundview Live webinar, bestselling author and world-renowned executive coach Marshall Goldsmith examines the environmental and psychological triggers that can derail us at work and in life. Filled with revealing and illuminating stories from his work with some of the most successful chief executives and power brokers in the business world, Goldsmith offers a personal playbook on how to achieve change in our lives, make it stick, and become the person we want to be.

Ann Herrmann-Nehdi – Unlock the Power of Whole Brain Thinking: Filled with real-world examples and essential charts, exercises, action steps, and strategies, this Soundview Live webinar shows you how to rethink your business, prepare for the future, realign your goals, and reinvigorate your team — by putting your whole brain to work.

Neel Doshi & Lindsay McGregor- How to Build the Highest Performing Cultures: In this Soundview Live webinar Neel Doshi and Lindsay McGregor explain the counter-intuitive science behind great cultures, building on over a century of academic thinking. They share the simple, highly predictive new measurement tool—the Total Motivation (ToMo) Factor—that enables you to measure the strength of your culture, and track improvements over time.

Not surprisingly, six of the eight top events are about improving personal skills, rather than focusing on the business. Webinars are the perfect venue for personal development and that may have been their main attraction this year. If you had a favorite Soundview Live webinar this year, let us know by commenting on this blog.

From Outsourcing To Global Talent: Common issues

Our guest blogger today is Ernest Gundling, PhD, Managing Partner at Aperian Global, a consulting firm he co-founded in 1990, and coauthor of Leading Across New Borders: How to Succeed as the Center Shifts.

 

Many companies with established outsourcing operations have found that the talent picture is changing. Tens of thousands of employees in places like Bangalore, Hyderabad, Surat, or Noida were originally hired to crunch data overnight while their Western counterparts slept, or to write pieces of code that were parceled out by project managers located elsewhere. However, people who have been performing these roles for years now have become more technically adept and have greater business experience; younger employees are also entering the workforce with higher expectations from the beginning.

Employees in traditional outsourcing locations now often aspire to broader and more responsible roles: leading project teams, interfacing directly with customers, authoring entire reports, scoping and designing new systems. Firms that are able to meet these aspirations will retain their top talent; those that do not are likely to lose it. It is not easy to make the transition from existing outsourcing roles to a global talent approach that matches each employee’s developmental stage with the opportunities available around the world. Beyond simply placing an employee in a new role, there are often critical skill gaps that need to be addressed. Consider the mutually frustrating encounter between a Western manager and his Indian counterpart outlined below.

Example: The Report
Michael, a team leader for a pharmaceutical company based in Switzerland, comments,

“Two weeks ago, I sent a report along to our team in Surat with the raw data and information on the target audience. I followed up with a check-in call to make sure that Jas, the person in India assigned to this project, had gotten the documents and see if he had any questions. I told him that, ideally, I needed the report in two weeks, and asked if he was okay with that. He said, ‘sure.’

“Two weeks later, I got the report back and saw that while Jas had integrated the raw data, the implications had not been interpreted at all. The key messages were not clear and the nuances in the tone and language were just not right for my European audience. Actually, the report was unfinished in many ways. So it was now up to me to rewrite it, without any cushion time, which then impacted my deadline. I would say that this feels pretty typical of my interaction with the team in Surat, although they are supposed to be providing end-to-end report writing services.

“I expected Jas to take the data and interpret it based on his expertise. He should be able to discern which messages need to come across to the audience and then craft those messages in a way that will make sense to our audience and add value to me. It will be quicker for me to just do the rewrite now rather than spend so much time explaining all the changes. I expect another professional like me to be able to own the communication he is writing and deliver a product that is complete, on time, and reflects a deep understanding of the material. We don’t necessarily get that from our team there. If there is a question about something, I am always available. I am just an e-mail away. But those questions should come up early enough for me to address them, without impacting the deadline.”

Meanwhile, Jas, an Indian team leader based in Surat, expresses his own frustrations:

“The project with Michael could have gone better. When Michael called, I had not yet had time to look at the documents he had sent since I was working on a couple of other reports. So I didn’t have any questions at that time and figured I could rely on my team here in Surat to figure out any elements I didn’t understand. The thing is, I can constantly discuss and get help with my local team if I have an issue, but how can I do this with Michael? I don’t even know him. If I start out by asking a million questions, he will think that I don’t know anything and I will lose credibility with him.

“When I finally got around to looking through the materials that Michael sent, I realized that it would take a lot of time to write this report. By that time, I only had a week left to complete it. I worked late hours with other members of my team trying to finish this document to meet Michael’s timeline. I was hopeful that we could complete it, but we were only able to finish it to a certain level. Anyway, it’s better that I get Michael’s input on what we already have written and then make changes from there.”

Often they give us only a small amount of information and then get angry when we aren’t able to read their minds. I am just responsible for doing the work I am given, to the specifications which have been outlined. Our client stakeholders determine those specifications. I am not in a position to argue with that. If they would give me more information or be more readily available—or if we had a relationship—that would be different. But the work is still just thrown over the wall to me and then there is silence. I try to match the specifications they send, but they often want me to make things up out of thin air. It is not my place to be offering my opinions in this kind of paper. I am just trying to give them what they want.”

Key Competencies
This dynamic between Michael and Jas points to the core struggles in play as organizations try to reposition themselves for global relevance. Most organizations recognize the trends and are in the process of aligning themselves to benefit from the global economic shifts. But they have found that their internal talent management processes are unable to keep up with, much less effectively drive, the organization’s global growth. The transition to global talent sourcing, it turns out, is not just a matter of hiring more global workers. It requires a colossal mindset shift in the organization and new approaches to delegation, teamwork, employee engagement, knowledge transfer, performance evaluation, and developing the competencies needed to make all of these possible.

Accountability & Communication

There are many components to building an executive presence, including posture, dress, gestures such as the form of one’s initial greetings, and so on. The rules for these are largely unwritten and vary somewhat by culture. There are also important general skills required of employees who aspire to join the executive ranks in most multinationals. There are clearly things that Jas could do in the report scenario just discussed to make the interaction more successful. Becoming a full-fledged global team partner brings with it a higher level of accountability. He currently appears to be expressing a kind of passive/aggressive attitude that is unlikely to establish him as an executive peer. If he wants others to see him as a true global partner, he needs to take more responsibility and initiative, and step out of an outsourcing mindset himself. There is a danger that he will create a self-fulfilling prophecy: if he assumes that he is being treated as a second-class corporate citizen and acts accordingly, he may find that this is indeed the way that others treat him, even if corporate policy is to move away from outsourcing. How can Jas get a virtuous cycle going by altering his approach?

If Jas is unclear about his responsibilities, it’s up to him to reach out and request clarification from Michael while expressing his intention to get the job done. It is not helpful to his reputation to provide a half-baked response and feel resentful about his role, especially if he is assuming that the ultimate responsibility lies elsewhere. Jas also needs to cultivate a particular skill of distilling and communicating key messages. Inexperienced people in his position tend to provide large volumes of detail without sufficiently digesting or interpreting the information. The term “executive summary” highlights the expectations of leaders who are exposed to large volumes of information on a daily basis. They want to know the main points and to have the option to drill down for further detail as needed; likewise, they expect their peers to be able to both synthesize and probe.

Several familiar cultural patterns were probably in the background of the initial response Jas gave to Michael: deference to hierarchy, a preference for relationship-based interactions, and reluctance to draw direct conclusions for others who will make their own inferences. For Jas to be effective at higher levels in this organization, however, he will need to understand these patterns and take steps to flex his own style. It is neither possible nor desirable for him to become a Westerner, but his current mentality will not serve him well in a global leadership position. Jas may find that Michael is amenable to meeting him partway if he asks him for help and expresses an eagerness to learn new skills.

Developing Future Leaders

There is responsibility on both sides in this example. It is all too common for a person in Michael’s role to conclude that Jas lacks business acumen and other essential leadership capabilities,evaluating the report Jas has produced negatively while doing the work himself or steering it elsewhere. Michael can help to break the cycle of unmet expectations and critical performance evaluation by reaching out to Jas and learning more about his capabilities and developmental needs.

It may be that Jas is not the right person for the role, but it is more likely that he needs hands-on mentoring, exposure to best practice models, and constructive feedback that will enable him to grow into his position. Jas will feel more comfortable talking about his developmental needs if he feels that Michael believes in him and is actively involved in providing support. Michael will also be better able to target what he delegates, and to accurately anticipate and rely upon the work that Jas produces. They should get to know each other a lot better, and this is a worthwhile investment of Michael’s time in spite of the geographical and cultural distance that separates them.

Organizations committed to global talent development will make sure that Michael is also held accountable for enabling his global colleagues such as Jas to move to the next level of performance. Leaders who are consistently able to do this will in the long run add far greater value to their companies than they will by deliberately or inadvertently shutting the door to those who could learn rapidly with the right kind of guidance.

Global Talent: The Rewards
Moving from mutual frustration to effective collaboration is complex because it requires a level of self-awareness and conscious effort from everyone involved. Jas cannot do all the work himself, and neither should Michael. When enough key individuals do learn to work together in a way that combines their skills, however, the results can be quite powerful, including retention of vital personnel, greater employee engagement, mutual learning, and higher levels of performance all around. Companies that create the formula for this will discover a powerful accelerator to their global growth, and a competitive edge versus rivals that remain stuck in old outsourcing models.

To learn more about leading in a global economy, join Dr. Gundling for our Soundview Live webinar: Leading Across New Borders.

Tips for Telling Compelling Stories When Training Leaders

Our guest blogger today is Dr. Paul White, author of Sync or Swim, continuing from last week’s blog on telling stories.

John was struggling with how to handle a difficult situation with a key vendor for the company. He went to his supervisor, Stephanie, and asked her advice on what he should do.  Rather than telling him what to do, or even giving her direct input, Stephanie replied, “John, let me tell you a story …”  She went on to tell a story about an experience she had early in her career and the   consequences of her decision over the years. When she was done, she paused and waited.  After a few seconds of silence, John smiled and said:  “Got it.  Thanks.”  He stood up and left the room, even though Stephanie hadn’t directly answered his question.

Throughout history and across cultures, stories have been used more than any other form of verbal expression to communicate foundational life lessons.   If you read the Greek philosophers, the wisdom literature from Asia, and the literature across the centuries designed to teach guiding principles for life – the “authors” used stories grounded in daily life rather than just stating the principle (or making lists of them, as most business books and articles do today.)

Tips for Telling Stories

Some people are natural storytellers – they just “do it”.  People listen to them, laugh, and enjoy hearing their stories.  For the rest of us, we need to work at it a bit.  Otherwise, our stories seem to fall flat with little impact on our listeners and sometimes there is just an awkward silence when we finish.  So here are some tips for learning to tell effective stories.

Where to Get Your Stories.  There are several sources for stories but the best one is your life.   You’ve gone through some situations that were challenging, hair-raising, and funny.  You were there so it is easy for you to remember. Some personal experiences and the stories that flow from that have to do with direct life experience.  You were there, felt the feelings, know what the dangers were, and how you felt when you got through the situation.  Other experiences are more indirect.  You were there but it was someone else going through the situation and you watched what happened (think about your parents while you were growing up, situations with your children, trips with friends).

A second treasure trove of stories are those told by others. This can include stories told by friends and family, stories told by authors in books, or the situations created and demonstrated in movies and TV shows. (By the way, movies are the modern cultural equivalent of orally told stories in past cultures.) YouTube videos also provide good visual short stories.  Note that trying to retell a story you’ve heard told by a friend can be difficult to tell effectively to others (especially if you only heard it once).

Practical Suggestions.  When telling a story, start by giving the context and setting (the “set up”) for what happens in the story is critical.  Some people start into a story without giving the listeners any clues either that they are telling a story or what the overall context is.  Next, share the main character’s perspective on what is going on – how did they see the situation?  What were they feeling?  This heightens the interest and energy level.  Then, make sure you get the sequence right. Not much “kills” a story more quickly than the storyteller having to go back and correct themselves (‘No, that’s not right.”) about what happened and when.  Clearly describing the challenge or dilemma (along with the person’s feeling response) is the next critical step.  Make sure your listeners know what the problem is that the character is facing, and their emotional response to the situation.  Tell what decision was made or the action chosen and then describe the result and its on impact you and the others in the situation.  Sometimes listeners “miss” an important part of the story or the context and need to be told exactly what happened and why it was important.  If needed, tell the lesson you learned.  In many stories, this is obvious, but sometimes the lesson you learned is important to delineate.

We all have interesting stories to tell. Sometimes we just need to stop and reflect, and then think about the best way to share the story in a way that will connect emotionally with others.

To learn more about communication at work, join Soundview and Dr. White for our webinar: Communicating Effectively Through Change.