Take Back Control with These Three New Summaries

Feeling as if you have no control over your work or job duties can lead to job stress. When the stress of constant connection and rapid changes in the marketplace start affecting your performance at work, applying new processes to your daily routine could bring great success. Learn how to take back control and handle the high demands by developing mindfulness, collaborating with others, and knowing when to think like a rookie with these three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries.

overworkedandoverwhelmed

by Scott Eblin

Overworked and Overwhelmed by Scott Eblin

Top leadership coach Scott Eblin provides simple routines to reduce stress and sustain peak performance and a personal planning framework for creating desired outcomes. Overworked and Overwhelmed offers practical insights for any professional who feels like his or her RPMs are maxed out in the red zone. Eblin makes his practice of mindfulness simple to offer actionable hope for today’s overworked and overwhelmed professional.

 

the reciprocity advantage

by Bob Johansen and Karl Ronn

The Reciprocity Advantage by Bob Johansen and Karl Ronn

Leading forecaster Bob Johansen and business developer Karl Ronn share a model for creating new growth for your business using the underutilized resources you already own that you can share with others. They describe a model for collaborating to do what you can’t do alone. The Reciprocity Advantage shows readers how to leverage new forces like cloud-served supercomputing into scalable and profitable growth for your organization.

 

rookie smarts

by Liz Wiseman

Rookie Smarts by Liz Wiseman

In a rapidly changing world, constant learning is more valuable than experience or mastery. Leadership expert Liz Wiseman explains how to reclaim and cultivate the curious, flexible, youthful mindset of a rookie in order to keep up with what’s needed from employees. In Rookie Smarts, Wiseman details the four modes of the rookie mindset that lead to success.

Book Review: Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does

If you feel that your efforts to motivate employees are falling short, you are not alone. Senior consulting partner for the Ken Blanchard Companies, Susan Fowler, reveals that motivating people doesn’t work because they are already motivated in Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does. Fowler helps leaders understand what they can do to go beyond traditional styles of motivation to help people not only be more productive and engaged but to bring a sense of purpose to their work. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

“You can use all your power attempting to motivate people, but it won’t work if you want them to experience an optimal motivational outlook. Shifting to an optimal motivational outlook is something people can do only for themselves,” writes Fowler. She presents a tested model and course of action that will help leaders guide their employees toward the type of motivation that will increase productivity and engagement. Her Optimal Motivation process shows leaders how to help people meet their needs for autonomy, relatedness and competence for long-lasting motivation. Of the three, relatedness is about our need to feel like we are contributing to something greater than ourselves. This is important for leaders to help their employees feel like all their work matters to the organization as a whole.

Fowler concludes her profound thoughts on motivation by re-thinking five beliefs, which she states erode workplace motivation. These eroding beliefs include: It’s Not Personal; It’s Just Business, The Purpose of Business Is to Make Money, Leaders Are in a Position of Power, The Only Thing That Really Matters Is Results, and If You Cannot Measure It, It Doesn’t Matter. As a leader, you can activate optimal motivation for yourself to become a role model for others in your organization with the insights in Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does.

Book Review: Pitch Perfect

pitch_perfect

by Bill McGowan and
Alisa Bowman

Effective communication is at the core of professional success. The difference between signing a deal or losing an account is how you communicate your message. It is important to be pitch perfect, precisely the right tone to the right person, to advance in your career. Renowned media coach Bill McGowan, along with journalist Alisa Bowman, show how to communicate with confidence during the pivotal moments of life in Pitch Perfect. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

“Holding your audience’s attention is like winning a tennis match at Wimbledon. You better have a clearly defined strategy, execute it brilliantly and muzzle any inner voice of self-doubt, or you’ll get crushed,” write McGowan and Bowman. They offer Seven Principles of Persuasion to construct the right message and deliver it using the right language, verbally and nonverbally. These principles are based upon years of McGowan’s experience communicating and succeeding via multiple mediums. Of the seven, the Scorsese Principle discusses keeping your audience engaged with visual aids to illustrate your story. This principle is based upon Martin Scorcese and his ability to tell stories that listeners can visualize. Images are more memorable than words, so in order to capture and hold the attention of your audience, you need to illustrate your point with stories they can imagine.

McGowan and Bowman share how to get people to remember what you have said. Executives will learn how to overcome common mistakes and implement a better way of communicating using effective verbal and nonverbal language with Pitch Perfect.

Book Review: Little Bets

little_bets

by Peter Sims

Rather than starting with a big idea or planning a whole project before you begin, many successful people and businesses make a methodical series of little bets. Little bets are low risk actions taken to test an idea. These little bets help determine direction while providing critical information from a number of little failures and small but significant wins. Bestselling author Peter Sims explores the value of taking small, experimental steps in developing breakthrough innovation in Little Bets. This book is now available as a Soundview Executive Book Summary.

“Practicing little bets frees us from the expectation that we should know everything we need to know before we begin. By focusing on doing rather than planning, learning about the risks and pitfalls of ideas rather than trying to predict them with precision up-front, an experimental approach develops growth mind-set muscles,” writes Sims. Based on extensive research, Sims discovered methods that unshackle anyone from the constraints of conventional planning, analytical thinking and linear problem solving that our educational system overemphasizes at the expense of creativity. Sims gives readers a critical takeaway when he explains how to leverage small wins to accomplish performance goals.

Sims shares examples of successful breakthrough innovators at work including Chris Rock, the Google founders, and Jeff Bezos and the dramatic results of their efforts. With Little Bets, anyone will be able to know the right moment to make a little bet to make a difference in the world around them.

New Summaries to Improve Your Skills

The ability to carry out our positions in the most effective and efficient way is often neglected in order to get the job done on time. However it is important to your career and organization to reflect on how processes can be done better or more effectively. Developing skills that can be applied to both your professional and personal life can lead to your highest potential. Learn how to improve your skills by being a better motivator, better communicator, and take better risks with these three new Soundview Executive Book Summaries.

pitch_perfect

by Bill McGowan and
Alisa Bowman

Pitch Perfect by Bill McGowan and Alisa Bowman

In our professional and personal lives, situations rest on how well we communicate. Bill McGowan, media guru and correspondent, teaches you how to get your message across and get what you want with pitch perfect communication. In Pitch Perfect, McGowan shows you how to construct the right message and deliver it using the right language, verbally and nonverbally. Throughout the book, he distills his ideas into seven principles leading readers to effective communication.

 

why_motivating_people

by Susan Fowler

Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does by Susan Fowler

Top leadership researcher, consultant, and coach Susan Fowler suggests stop trying to motivate people because it doesn’t work. In Why Motivating People Doesn’t Work … and What Does, Fowler builds upon scientific research on human motivation to present readers a model that will help leaders guide their employees toward motivation that not only increases productivity and engagement but that gives them a sense of purpose and fulfillment. Knowing what doesn’t work, why it doesn’t work, and what does will help leaders bring change in their organizations.

 

little_bets

by Peter Sims

Little Bets by Peter Sims

It is always rewarding when you take a risk and it pays off. In Little Bets, bestselling Peter Sims found that rather than start with a big idea or plan a whole project in advance, you should make a methodical series of little bets, low-risk actions taken to test an idea. This book offers readers a new way to explore and develop new possibilities with engaging accounts of innovators around the world who capitalized off their little bets.