The Art of Leading by Looking Ahead

Anticipate

Business schools, leadership gurus and strategy guides agree — leaders must have a vision. But the sad truth is that most don’t…or at least not one that compels, inspires
and energizes their people. How can something so essential be practiced so little in real life? Vision may sound like a rare quality, unattainable by all except a select few — but nothing could be further from the truth. Anyone can expand their visionary capacity. You just need to learn how.

In Anticipate, strategy and leadership expert Rob-Jan de Jong explains that to develop
vision you must sharpen two key skills. The first is the ability to see things early — spotting
the first hints of change on the horizon. The second is the power to connect the
dots — turning those clues into a gripping story about the future of your organization
and industry. Packed with stories and practices, Anticipate provides proven techniques for
looking ahead and exploring many plausible futures, including the author’s trademarked
Future Priming process, which helps distinguish signal from noise.

You will discover how to tap into your imagination and open yourself to the unconventional,
become better at seeing things early, frame the big-picture view that provides
direction for the future, and communicate your vision in a way that engages others and
provokes action. When you anticipate change before your competitors, you create enormous strategic advantage. That’s what visionaries do … and now so can you.

Part I: Visionary Content

The Groundwork
Creating a vision requires ideas, ideally intriguing and refreshing ideas that trigger people’s interest, curiosity and excitement. It requires engagement with your imagination and an ability to think outside the clichéd box.

Tapping into Your Imagination
Without imagination, you are stating the obvious or holding on to the status quo; your  vision falls flat. With it, however, your vision becomes intriguing, exciting, refreshing.
Suddenly, it has the potential to energize and mobilize.

Part II: Visionary Practices

Developing Your Visionary Capacity
The potential to come up with — and hold on to and cultivate — a brilliant idea or a vision is within all of us. Visionary leadership isn’t a personality trait, although it is sometimes confused with concepts like charismatic leadership. The big question is how. How do you go about developing this crucial leadership competence?

Seeing Things Early
We’re not aiming to become accurate, or even good, predictors of the future. Instead, we’re working to develop an increased awareness of changing realities, building
antennas for the distant signals that might push the future in a different direction from the one we currently and conventionally foresee. We can then become better at recognizing those signals and their potential impact when they present themselves in some early form. Your ability to see things early is at the heart of what leadership expert Warren Bennis calls adaptive capacity.

Connecting the Dots
In addition to strengthening the ability to see things early, we must equally improve our ability to create a coherent story going forward. This coherent story must consist of what we expect, foresee, envision, and anticipate. It needs to resonate, make sense, and be the guiding light into the future for our followers. I call this second developmental dimension of visionary capacity the ability to connect the dots.

Part III: Your Visionary Self

Your Visionary Self
Author Warren Bennis promotes an integrated perspective on leadership, consisting of four essential competencies: vision, adaptive capacity, voice, and integrity. Here we’ll explore the relationship between your visionary capacity and Bennis’ concepts of voice and integrity — the identity-oriented aspects.

Mindful Behavior
Leading with authenticity also means you must practice what you preach. The best evidence of your true feelings and beliefs comes less from your words than from your
deeds. When your words are believably connected to what you do, when you behave in line with your vision, only then do you display integrity and build trust with your followers.

Part IV: Visionary Communication

Igniting Your Followers
You can have great ideas, make the powerful practices second nature, have clarity on your core purpose and values, and exercise the right behaviors for growth. But if you are unable to communicate your vision in a way that engages and energizes others, the Vision Thing still won’t work for you. There are several specific visionary communication qualities that, when done right, will transform your story from something future-oriented but technical and uninspiring to something that invigorates your followers.

 

Find New Approaches with These Summaries

This month, our book summaries are all about looking ahead and finding new approaches to doing business. Learn how to anticipate the future of your organization, prepare for change, and take a new approach to working with people. Each of these authors are on the cutting edge in their area of expertise.

Anticipate

 

 

 

Anticipate
by Rob-Jan de Jong

Business schools, leadership gurus and strategy guides agree — leaders must have a vision. But the sad truth is that most don’t…or at least not one that compels, inspires and energizes their people. How can something so essential be practiced so little in real life? Vision may sound like a rare quality, unattainable by all except a select few — but nothing could be further from the truth. Anyone can expand their visionary capacity. You just need to learn how.

In Anticipate, strategy and leadership expert Rob-Jan de Jong explains that to develop vision you must sharpen two key skills. The first is the ability to see things early — spotting the first hints of change on the horizon. The second is the power to connect the dots — turning those clues into a gripping story about the future of your organization and industry. Packed with stories and practices, Anticipate provides proven techniques for looking ahead and exploring many plausible futures, including the author’s trademarked Future Priming process, which helps distinguish signal from noise.

You will discover how to tap into your imagination and open yourself to the unconventional, become better at seeing things early, frame the big-picture view that provides direction for the future, and communicate your vision in a way that engages others and provokes action. When you anticipate change before your competitors, you create enormous strategic advantage. That’s what visionaries do … and now so can you.

stackingthedeck

 

 

 

Stacking the Deck
by David S. Pottruck

Change is a constant, and leaders must do more than keep up — they must innovate and accelerate to succeed. Yet people are often unnerved by change. As a leader during a time of transformation, you may stand up before teams that are indifferent, or even hostile, and need to convince them that change is necessary and urgent. What does it take to be an effective change leader and increase the odds of success?

Stacking the Deck presents a nine-step course of action leaders can follow from the first realization that change is needed through all the steps of implementation, including assembling the right team of close advisors and getting the word out to the wider group. Based on Dave Pottruck’s experiences leading change as CEO of Charles Schwab and later as chairman of CorpU and HighTower Advisors, these steps provide a guide to ensure that your change initiative and your team have the best possible shot at success.

Leading an organization through major change — whether it’s the introduction of a new product, an expansion to a new territory or a difficult downsizing — is not for the faint of heart. While success is never guaranteed, the right leadership, process, and team make all the difference. For all leaders facing major change in their organizations, Stacking the Deck is an indispensable resource for putting the
odds in your favor.

giveandtake

 

 

 

Give and Take
by Adam Grant

For generations we have focused on the individual drivers of success: passion, hard work, talent and luck. But in today’s dramatically reconfigured world, success is increasingly dependent on how we interact with others. Give and Take illuminates what effective networking, collaboration, influence, negotiation and leadership skills have in common.

Adam Grant examines the surprising forces that shape why some people rise to the top of the success ladder, while others sink to the bottom. In professional interactions, it turns out that most people operate as takers, matchers or givers. Whereas takers strive to get as much as possible from others and matchers aim to trade evenly, givers are the rare breed of people who contribute to others without expecting anything in return.

Using his own groundbreaking studies, Grant reveals that these styles have a dramatic impact on success. Although some givers get exploited and burn out, the rest achieve extraordinary results across a wide range of industries. Praised by social scientists, business theorists and corporate leaders, Give and Take opens up an approach to work, interactions and productivity that is nothing short of revolutionary. This visionary approach to success has the power to transform not just individuals and groups but entire organizations and communities.

 

 

 

Bringing Romance Back to Business

Yes, you read that title right!

To many of us this is a foreign concept. What do romance and business have to do with each other?

Tim Leberecht thinks they have a lot to do with each other, that romance is essential to a successful business. Leberecht states: “[Business] is an indispensable part of our lives, from the long hours we work to the products and services we buy—and yet business seems divorced from the full expression of our humanity. For many of us, something is missing, something both essential and immeasurable that lets us see the world with fresh eyes every day: romance.”

So first we should define this romance that Leberecht is talking about. In The Business Romantic, Leberecht reveals the power of business to elevate us above mere rationality and self-interest toward deep, passionate exchanges that honor our most complete selves. From strategy to the workplace, from product innovation to branding, customer relationships, and sales, Leberecht presents ten “Rules of Enchantment” that illustrate the value of choosing intimacy over transparency, mystery over clarity, devotion over data, vulnerability over control, delight over satisfaction, and love over liking.

The 10 Rules of Enchantment:
1. Find the Big in the Small
2. Be a Stranger
3. Give More Than You Take
4. Suffer (A Little)
5. Fake It
6. Keep the Mystique
7. Break Up
8. Sail the Ocean
9. Take the Long Way Home
10. Stan Alone, Stand By, Stand Still

If you would like to bring a little romance in to your business, then join us on March 19th to hear the full explanation of these rules of enchantment from Tim Leberecht himself at our Soundview Live webinar, Bringing Romance Back to Business.

How to Use Big Data to Win Customers, Beat Competitors, and Boost Profits

TAKING ADVANTAGE OF BIG DATA

When used car dealer Les Kelley launched the Kelley Blue Book, his target customers were used car dealers (and insurance companies and banks that made car loans). Dealers could consult the book and, based on the information it contained, have an idea of what price tag to put on their merchandise. Today, the target customers for the Kelley Blue Book, now free online, are used car buyers who consult it to have an idea of what they should pay for the used car they are buying.

The customer flip for Kelley’s Blue Book exemplifies the switch in power in the purchasing process from seller to buyer. Buyers are no longer dependent on sellers to give them the information they need to make a purchasing decision. So in this new purchasing paradigm, are sellers completely powerless?

The answer is no, and the reason, in large part, is what is commonly known as “big data.” As explained in The Big Data-Driven Business by LinkedIn marketing executives Russell Glass and Sean Callahan, in today’s world, buyers don’t have to go to sellers in order to find the information they need to make the right decisions. Instead, they can use a variety of digital search channels to gather any information they need and then approach the sellers.

However, write Glass and Callahan, the same digital capability that allows buyers to take the initiative allows sellers to follow what the buyers are doing. They track the websites and pages within those sites that buyers or potential buyers are visiting. They also track purchasing trends, which merchandise is popular at a given time, which items lead to the purchase of other items and a whole host of other customer-related data — so much data, in fact, that we now refer to all of this information as “big data.”

Such extensive tracking takes some sophisticated software, of course. This software, write Glass and Callahan, is what is known as the “marketing stack.”

The marketing stack includes marketing automation software, business intelligence databases, CRM systems, content management systems (which allow marketers to take over updating digital marketing content with minimal IT involvement), blogging and data management platforms, analytics tools, social media management platforms, search engine platforms, and other systems and software that, in essence, enable marketers to manage the accumulation and analysis of big data.

Principles for the Data-Driven Company

It may seem, from the litany of technological systems just cited, that establishing a big data-driven company is complex and expensive. It can indeed be complex. The chief marketing officer and the chief information officer must work closely together if a company is going to have any success at using big data. Some companies have started hiring “chief marketing technologists” solely responsible for the technology side of marketing. The bottom line is that all marketing professionals today must be at least knowledgeable about the technological components of the marketing function.

Using big data does not have to be expensive, however. In one of the most insightful chapters, Glass and Callahan offer 11 principles for successfully making a business more data-driven. Among the principles are, determine what you want to know about your customers and prospects; start small; don’t bet everything on technology (figure out first what you need, not what technology you want to use); and hire the right people — forget the art schools, and think about Star Trek conventions instead.

Glass, who heads B2B marketing at LinkedIn, and Callahan, LinkedIn’s senior manager for content marketing, present a guide for marketers in companies of all sizes.

Rediscovering the Art of Brand Marketing

MARKETING IN A DIGITAL WORLD

There are a lot of shiny objects in the world of marketing today. Traditional marketing channels such as television and print media ads are being outshone by the flashier marketing opportunities of the digital age, including big data mining and social media marketing. Many marketing experts happily sound the death knell of traditional marketing: television ads might have worked in the time of the giant television console with its rabbit ears, but this is the age of Hulu and Netflix.

In a new book titled Twitter Is Not a Strategy, Tom Doctoroff, CEO of J. Walter Thompson Asia, begs to differ. Given that global television advertising revenues are forecast to grow from $162 billion in 2012 to more than $200 billion in 2017, according to PriceWaterhouseCoopers, it seems a bit disingenuous, he writes, to say that television advertising is dead. The world is indeed changing, but it’s not a question of the past being replaced by the future.

As Doctoroff explains, traditional marketing was based on top-down positioning. The brands controlled the message and the channel, and customers were passive recipients. The digital age has given the customer more power in the process, which is now more bottom-up than top-down. Many marketing books tout this dichotomy as mutually exclusive; in other words, bottom-up has replaced top-down marketing. For Doctoroff, this is a false dichotomy. Marketing today is both bottom-up and top-down. That is why social media marketing is booming, but so is television ad purchasing.

Successful Marketing Today

The secret to successful marketing today, writes Doctoroff, is to know how to meld the two approaches together. “We must permit consumers to participate with brands without surrendering the ability to manage the message and what people say about their products,” he writes. The goal of marketers is to develop a life-long relationship between the brand and consumers.

To help companies enable customer engagement while managing the message, Doctoroff offers a framework for marketing based on four “interconnected modules.”

The first two modules are conceptual and focus on customer insight, on one hand, and the brand idea, on the other. No matter how much technology evolves, customer insight must remain at the core of marketing, he writes. Doctoroff describes the human truths shared by all and nation- or region-specific cultural truths, and explains how brands succeed when they can resolve the conflicts among and within these two sets of truths. Mont Blanc pens, for example, are very successful in China because, he writes, the luxury brand reconciles two competing cultural truths: “the desire to project accomplishments but also the need to be understated, to obey the rules.”

The brand idea, in Doctoroff’s words, “crystallizes the long-term relationship between consumer and brand that remains consistent yet evolves over time.” The brand idea emerges from the “fusion” between customer insight and a unique brand offer (UBO). The UBO, he writes, is based on product truths –– physical or emotional characteristics that differentiate the product, and brand truths, which build brand equity in the minds of consumers.

The executional modules of Doctoroff’s framework are engagement ideas, the ideas that will spark consumers to become engaged with the brand, and engagement planning, which is focused on bringing the brand into the lives of consumers. Successful engagement ideas connect to the three levels of passion, he writes: the individual-focused “me,” the community-focused “we” and the global-focused “the world.” For engagement planning, Doctoroff offers a step-by-step engagement system based on marketing communication at every step of the buying process: trigger (the unmet need), consideration, comparison, preference (choosing the brand), purchase and experience.

The core message of Twitter Is Not a Strategy is clearly conveyed when Doctoroff quotes Clive Sirkin, Kimberly-Clark’s global Chief Marketing Officer, who says, “We don’t believe in digital marketing. We believe in marketing in a digital world, and there’s a huge difference.” Twitter Is Not a Strategy also benefits from the global perspective that Doctoroff brings to the subject. His expertise in both China and emerging markets will be of immense value to companies looking to expand into these markets. Doctoroff has written a balanced, informed guide to branding in the 21st century.

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