How to Recognize and Cultivate the Three Essential Virtues

Image result for the ideal team playerIn his classic book, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Patrick Lencioni laid out a groundbreaking approach for tackling the perilous group behaviors that destroy teamwork. Here he turns his focus to the individual, revealing the three indispensable virtues of an ideal team player. In The Ideal Team Player, Lencioni tells the story of Jeff Shanley, a leader desperate to save his uncle’s company by restoring its cultural commitment to teamwork. Jeff must crack the code on the virtues that real team players possess, and then build a culture of hiring and development around those virtues.

Beyond the fable, Lencioni presents a practical framework and actionable tools for identifying, hiring and developing ideal team players. Whether you’re a leader trying to create a culture around teamwork, a staffing professional looking to hire real team players or a team player wanting to improve yourself, this book will prove to be as useful as it is compelling.

In this summary, you will learn:
• An entertaining story of how leaders discover and embrace the three virtues of the ideal team player.
• The distinct, surprising features of the three virtues and how to recognize those features. • How people behave when they possess only one or two of the virtues.
• Principles and tips for hiring, assessing and developing people according to the three virtues.
• Tips for embedding the virtues in your organization.

Review: Above the Line by Urban Meyer

At the end of the 2010 football season, University of Florida football coach Urban Meyer was at the top of his game. In only six seasons at Florida, he had already won two championships. And more championships were predicted.

Then Meyer stunned the college football world by announcing that he was stepping down as coach for personal reasons — a catch-all reason given by those in positions of authority looking for a discreet escape hatch. However, the catch-all phrase was right on target for Meyer that year. He was indeed leaving the program for personal reasons. His personal health. His personal relationships. His personal priorities.

In 2012, Urban Meyer returned to coaching at Ohio State University, the team for whom he had rooted as a boy growing up in Ashtabula, Ohio. He had not lost his desire to win, the competitive drive that had been instilled in him by his supportive but no-holds-barred father. (His father rewarded his son with a special dinner when, as a boy, Meyer got into his first fight, protecting his sister.) Meyer was also as intense as he had always been about his expectations of hard work and commitment to the team. There was, however, a new focus on life balance and a greater sense of priority…..