Guest Blog: How to Create a Solid Team by Daniel Milstein

Image result for teamThere is generally no such thing as a successful “lone wolf.” Talent might win the game, but it takes teamwork to capture the championship. Nearly everything I have accomplished so far has been the result of a group effort. From my work at McDonald’s as a teenager, to becoming the founder and CEO of the Gold Star Family of Companies, I was always aware that my success wouldn’t have been possible without the other team members’ support. If you want to succeed, you must depend on the cooperation of co-workers, business colleagues, family members and friends. Here’s how:

Build your team. You may not have a formal team to support you. However, you still have a group of people with whom you work—even though you may all have equal standing. Consider colleagues and associates as team members who can help you reach your job-related goals. Include them in your planning process when appropriate, and listen to their suggestions. You can also help them reach their goals. If you are self-employed and work alone, you still have family and friends who can provide a strong network of support for your business. Bounce ideas off of them, ask them to help spread the word about your work, and collaborate with others when necessary. Even an artist or writer doesn’t work alone. They need readers, printers, art collectors and reviewers to truly be successful. Build your team well. Fill it with those willing to support you. You cannot expect to lead a positive life if you surround yourself with negative people.

Be willing to collaborate.  Don’t aspire to be the best on the team. Aspire to be the best for the team. Many people feel competitive when working with others, and try to get their ideas heard above the rest. I’ve been in meetings where ego gets in the way of production. People get so caught up in figuring out who gets the credit that nothing gets accomplished. Sometimes things even go into litigation over ego issues. If you are simply trying to be the best on the team, you don’t leave much room for other people to grow and to lead. Don’t be a spotlight-stealer. What you build together will be stronger than what you build alone.

Create more leaders. True leaders don’t create followers; they create more leaders. That’s why we at Gold Star look for new employees who have the potential to become leaders; they can continue helping us grow while they develop their careers. The great ones want to be coaches and get better every day. If you give people the opportunity to lead, they become more invested in the company. As their ideas become reality, they aspire to have even more contributions. It feels good to succeed. Teach the beginners, help them grow, and your company will thrive.

Value every team member. There is no one person on a team that should be underestimated. Everyone is important. The automobile is a great example of teamwork. In order to build a car, someone had to make the tires, someone had to build the components, someone had to mine the copper mine for the wires, and someone had to make and drive the trucks that hauled the copper ore. It takes so many people to make a car, and no one can say that the tire is more important than the copper. The car can’t run without all the parts. Every member of the team is essential.

Teamwork is the key to success. It is often said that if service is beneath you, leadership is beyond you. Someone is sitting the shade today because someone planted a tree long ago. Success is like that—it takes many steps to accomplish your goals, and a lot of hard work. As I always say, success is never owned. It’s rented, and the rent is due every day.

 


Daniel Milstein is the CEO and founder of the Gold Star Family of Companies, operating in over 40 offices worldwide, specializing in financial services, sports management, publishing, and film production. Under Dan’s visionary leadership, Gold Star has been named among Inc. magazine’s 500 Fastest Growing Companies in America. He is a best-selling author and shares his other strategies for success in his new book Rule #1 Don’t Be #2: You Get What You Work For, Not What You Wish For.  Learn more at DanMilstein.com.

How to Recognize and Cultivate the Three Essential Virtues

Image result for the ideal team playerIn his classic book, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Patrick Lencioni laid out a groundbreaking approach for tackling the perilous group behaviors that destroy teamwork. Here he turns his focus to the individual, revealing the three indispensable virtues of an ideal team player. In The Ideal Team Player, Lencioni tells the story of Jeff Shanley, a leader desperate to save his uncle’s company by restoring its cultural commitment to teamwork. Jeff must crack the code on the virtues that real team players possess, and then build a culture of hiring and development around those virtues.

Beyond the fable, Lencioni presents a practical framework and actionable tools for identifying, hiring and developing ideal team players. Whether you’re a leader trying to create a culture around teamwork, a staffing professional looking to hire real team players or a team player wanting to improve yourself, this book will prove to be as useful as it is compelling.

In this summary, you will learn:
• An entertaining story of how leaders discover and embrace the three virtues of the ideal team player.
• The distinct, surprising features of the three virtues and how to recognize those features. • How people behave when they possess only one or two of the virtues.
• Principles and tips for hiring, assessing and developing people according to the three virtues.
• Tips for embedding the virtues in your organization.

Join Us for a FREE webinar with Best-Selling Author and Business Leader, Patrick Lencioni

lencioniRegistration is now open for the FREE Patrick Lencioni webinar “How to Be the Ideal Team Player” presented by Soundview on Thursday, May 5th at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

Register today and get a FREE summary of Lencioni’s book, The Ideal Team Player.

Whether you’re a leader trying to create a culture around teamwork, a staffing professional looking to hire real team players, or a team player wanting to improve yourself, this webinar offers applicable tips for your career.

In this FREE Soundview Live webinar, How to Be the Ideal Team Player, Patrick Lencioni uses a fable to dissect the ins and outs of an ideal team player. Lencioni tells the story of Jeff Shanley, a leader desperate to save his uncle’s company by restoring its cultural commitment to teamwork. Jeff must crack the code on the virtues that real team players possess, and then build a culture of hiring and development around those virtues.

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Register Here:
http://www.summary.com/free-webinar/lencioni
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You Will Learn:

  • The three indispensable virtues of an ideal team player
  • A practical framework and actionable tools for identifying, hiring, and developing ideal team players
  • How to improve your ability to lead and be an active team player

About the Speaker:

Patrick Lencioni is founder and president of The Table Group, a firm dedicated to helping leaders improve their organizations’ health since 1997. His principles have been embraced by leaders around the world and adopted by organizations of virtually every kind including multinational corporations, entrepreneurial ventures, professional sports teams, the military, nonprofits, schools, and churches.

Lencioni is the author of ten business books with over three million copies sold worldwide. His work has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Bloomberg Businessweek, and USA Today.

Review: Above the Line by Urban Meyer

At the end of the 2010 football season, University of Florida football coach Urban Meyer was at the top of his game. In only six seasons at Florida, he had already won two championships. And more championships were predicted.

Then Meyer stunned the college football world by announcing that he was stepping down as coach for personal reasons — a catch-all reason given by those in positions of authority looking for a discreet escape hatch. However, the catch-all phrase was right on target for Meyer that year. He was indeed leaving the program for personal reasons. His personal health. His personal relationships. His personal priorities.

In 2012, Urban Meyer returned to coaching at Ohio State University, the team for whom he had rooted as a boy growing up in Ashtabula, Ohio. He had not lost his desire to win, the competitive drive that had been instilled in him by his supportive but no-holds-barred father. (His father rewarded his son with a special dinner when, as a boy, Meyer got into his first fight, protecting his sister.) Meyer was also as intense as he had always been about his expectations of hard work and commitment to the team. There was, however, a new focus on life balance and a greater sense of priority…..